Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey every. I took delivery of a Specialized Elite Apex Comp last Friday evening and have been enjoying it ever since. I rode to work today and plan to ride every Friday (and upcoming Monday as I have to work). I encounter a few hills which give me some difficulty. Part of this (and perhaps most of it) is due to me being out of shape. But I was wondering if you guys normally have trouble getting up hills or if perhaps it's my wheelset which is the standard wheelset that comes w/ that model.

What is the proper amount of air I should have in tires and should I be using a different type of tire? Also, would a different wheelset make that big a difference when encountering hills?
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
Hey every. I took delivery of a Specialized Elite Apex Comp last Friday evening and have been enjoying it ever since. I rode to work today and plan to ride every Friday (and upcoming Monday as I have to work). I encounter a few hills which give me some difficulty. Part of this (and perhaps most of it) is due to me being out of shape. But I was wondering if you guys normally have trouble getting up hills or if perhaps it's my wheelset which is the standard wheelset that comes w/ that model.

What is the proper amount of air I should have in tires and should I be using a different type of tire? Also, would a different wheelset make that big a difference when encountering hills?
Climbing is all about a riders STW ratio (maximum strength/ minimal weight). Sure, a lighter bike/ wheelset will lessen the load, but unless you're talking several pounds total difference, IME, the performance difference is minimal, at best.

Assuming you've built some base miles, what's going to help your climbing ability is to do hill repeats, along with interval training. Anything that builds your fitness. Also, a good fit and maintaining good form (including developing a smooth pedal stroke) increases a riders efficiency and endurance, so some things to focus/ work on.

The 'proper' air pressure to run depends on a variety of factors, including rider weight, tires size/ construction and road conditions (among other factors).

Here's a guide that you can use to determine a good starting point. I'd recommend going with a slightly higher number, tapering down from there. The ideal is to run the lowest pressure you can without fear of pinch flatting or increasing rolling resistance.

Michelin Bicycle USA - A better way forward®

Don't just reference the chart. The text has some good info/ guidelines as well.
 

·
Masters Neophyte
Joined
·
2,209 Posts
.. I encounter a few hills which give me some difficulty. Part of this (and perhaps most of it) is due to me being out of shape. But I was wondering if you guys normally have trouble getting up hills or if perhaps it's my wheelset which is the standard wheelset that comes w/ that model.
It's not your wheelset- it's your fitness. I have the same problem. Don't feel too bad- even as you continue working at it and get stronger, the hills are still HARD.
(At least for most riders, not sure about lightweight climber types)
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top