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Several months ago, I purchased a rather “upscale” roadbike. I carried it home from the dealer inside my hatchback. I then purchased a trunk mount rack on which I have been carrying the bike short distances.

Last week I purchased a new SUV and had a receiver hitch put on specifically to get a hitch rack for transporting. I went back to the bike dealer to get a hitch rack and the owner insisted that a quality bike should never be transported by attaching the frame to those rubber mounts. He said the only way to go was one of those racks which attaches the front dropouts to a solid post and allows the rear wheel to ride on the flat rail.

After discussing the high price of such racks, he handed me a $20 device which looks like a wheel skewer. He suggested mounting it to a 2x6 board and mounting the bike to it standing up in the back of the SUV.

If this works without having the bike move about too much, it sounds like a good, save, dry, way to transport. Any thoughts on bike transport in general?
 
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I have been carrying my bikes on either the roof of my car / or on a hitch mounted rack for over almost 30 years.

I have even "gasp" carried them on those rubber thingies that attach to the frame.

I have yet to damage a bike in transport, except for the time I drove under the clearance marker at IKEA. That was the fault of the stupid idiot driver.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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IMO inside the vehicle, if you can do it, is definitely the way to go. I've had roof racks, and they're nice. You have to be very aware to not drive into garages, through drive-thrus, etc. so you don't wipe the bike(s) off the roof. Rear racks are my last choice. IMO, there's too much danger of damage either from collisions or from damage to the bike caused by the rack. I'm talking about scratches, dents, paint damage, etc. This can also be true of your bike damaging your car.
 

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I use the board...

solution, actually a 2x4. I drive an old pickup, 35 years old to be exact, and have an aluminum shell cover over the bed. I mounted 2 of the brackets on the board, so I can carry 2 bikes. I have the board rigged so I can remove it when I don't need it and can even padlock the board into the truck and lock the bike to the board. Not rock solid security, but I don't worry about leaving it in the truck if I stop at the store.

This works really will and keeps things dry in the event of a rain shower. :)
 

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The board is an excellent solution.

I now drive a pickup and I bolted fork mounts to my toolbox. The model I bought has a lock feature that holds the bike with a padlock. Works great. I can secure 3 bikes for about $60. Not bad.
 

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Collin's Dad
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Well it does appear all fork mount hitch mount racks are expensive, but awhile bike nashbar had a 2 bike hich mount w/ the trays and fork mounts for $75. This was about a year ago and I can't find it online there anymore.

Take the front wheel off and see if your bike will fit in the rear of your vehicle w/out removing the seat post before you go to the trouble of installing the mount a board. Depending on the SUV and also the size bike / BB to top of saddle length you have will determine or not if it'll fit. I've got a trooper and I ride a 58cm bike, about 6' tall, and am able to mount my bike like this. I ended up taking out the tie downs and buying longer bolts and actually bolting the board down in the back so that the bike is more secure in case of an accident.
 

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Inside

I'm a firm believer of transporting my bike inside a vehicle. I don't want it exposed to all the road debris that other vehicles kick up. I have driven by gravel truck many times and had my car practically sandblasted from fine gravel blowing out of the trucks. Imagine what that would do to a bike! Also transporting outside exposes it to oil splatters and other elements.

I have a small hatch-back ('95 Acura Integra) which if I fold down the rear seats, I can lay my 60cm Madone in the back on its side complete without even removing the wheels, and I don't have to worry about overhead objects like garages etc. Very convenient, and cheap.
 

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I'm a firm believer of transporting my bike inside a vehicle.
My feelings as well. It's amazing how little room you need to haul a bike inside a car if you rid yourself of two widely held notions: (1) bikes always need to remain upright, and (2) rear wheels are difficult to remove and replace.
 

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ONLY inside!

Purchase criteria for one of our vehicles: Must be able to carry two bikes (road or mtn) standing up, by ONLY removing the front wheel (leaving saddle "as-is") and clamping the fork ends in just what your dealer described---Two fork clamp thingys mounted on a piece of 1"x6" oak plank with some rubber feet stuck on the bottom. Also MUST leave enough room for a week's worth of luggage and a cooler. Whew!

Not many vehicles can meet this criteria: Vans & mini-vans and only the largest SUVs. Most SUVs just don't have enough floor-to-ceiling clearance.

The rubber feet on the bottom keep the plank from sliding around while hauling bikes.

We currently have a Mazda MPV mini-van. Before that a Ford Expedition. Before the Expy, an Isuzu Trooper.

Not only do our bikes stay clean, they are amazingly secure. Hard to see through the tinted windows. They can also be covered by old towels, hiding the brand-name decals, etc. I usually run a cable lock between the locking rings for the rear seat as extra security. Only takes a couple of seconds, and will surely stop the "smash-and-grab" thief. The front wheels are bungeed to the sides of the van at the rear, leaving the center area, between the bikes, for luggage, etc. Works beautifully.

Years ago, when we had smaller vehicles (small pickup with a cab-high shell, for example) the bikes were laid down, with blankets or moving pads placed between them. Didn't leave too much room for other gear unless the extra gear fit under the bikes (ok) or on top of them (bad idea).
 
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