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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know it's not a light weight but my bike weighs 23.6 pounds, give or take an ounce or two. it's a 56cm steel single speed road frame that takes a wide tire. it has 700X32s on ALEX 600 rims and a trk selle smp saddle. bullhorn bars with reverse brake levers and tektro calipers. I know weight doesn't much matter now as i'm up around 275 pounds. what do your bikes weigh? does this seem heavy for the bike I described? should I bother trying to lose some weight?
 

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my lightest bike weighs 17.5 lbs, heaviest is 21lbs. I weigh 171 lbs. You will notice a lot more improvement from dropping your weight than your bikes weight, and it's a lot less expensive.
 

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What the what???
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I know weight doesn't much matter now as i'm up around 275 pounds.
You've basically answered your own question. I have three bikes, and absolutely no idea what any of them weigh. As a Clyde, I'm only concerned whether they are strong enough for me to feel confident riding them. If there are pounds to be lost beyond that, they're mine, not the bike's. JMHO.
 

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If your BMI is over 25, your next purchase should be a copy of this book:
https://www.amazon.com/AEROBICS-Kenneth-H-Cooper/dp/055323546X
To get your 4X a week ride to run your pulse up to the recommended band for long enough, you may have to add weights to your bike.
To make achieving healthy profile less of a nuisance, see this video Seven Keys to Incredible Health Dr Joel Fuhrman" probably available in entirety to PBS subscribers: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=dr+fuhrman+seven+keys&qpvt=dr+furman+seven+keys&FORM=VDRE
or read one of Dr joel fuhrman books.
I followed a low sugar (<7 g/meal) high vegetable fat (not saturated) diet since 2008, and dropped 45 lb , cholesterol down without pills (210 to 185), and rest pulse down from 85 (working 3rd shift) to 66 (riding bike & exercising without working). I saw Dr. Fuhrman show after I'd already lost 25 lb. I eat a lot of sweets and carbs, mostly no-sugar sweets & carbs, plus tuna & turkey sandwiches on no-sugar Italian bread, plus no-sugar peanut butter & no-sugar jelly sandwiches on same. 2 salads a day w/ low sugar dressing, , some low sugar fruit,
I work out upper body with a 5 lb weight & rubber bands. You may need a little more, my healthiest weight was 130 lb.
Enjoy your hobby.
 

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Yes If it makes you feel better and ride more maybe it will help you to shed some weight off the body.

From a performance perspective a couple pounds off most bikes is nearly imperceptible. Meaning, you may "feel" a difference, but, increasing average speed, time to climb, etc...it's just not as big of a difference as people think.

So yeah upgrading stuff to lighten it up to go faster will probably leave you feeling depressed. Focus on riding more and eating less.
 

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my surly little niece said to her older, chubby cousin (my nephew), "wanna lose ten pounds of ugly fat?"

"um ... sure?"

"cut your head off."
 

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my surly little niece said to her older, chubby cousin (my nephew), "wanna lose ten pounds of ugly fat?"

"um ... sure?"

"cut your head off."
That same advice was being given when I was ten yrs old.

To the OP, at 275 lbs body weight, what do you think that you're going to gain by making your bike lighter?
 

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Best diet advice ever:

Yogi Yorgesson Diet

Living in the upper mid west (you can get Fried Pickles around here) I follow Yogi's advice. Also, lots of hot caffeinated beverage of your choice. Or beer if you like the stuff.

If OP is too fat they know it. If they are in the sickly range with an elevated pulse and cholesterol count, BP, blood sugar, etc they need to work with someone medical who can evaluate them personally and work with them to get those numbers back where they belong. But that was not their question.

Now, on to the question that was asked. Yes, your bike is a little on the heavy side for a single speed. So what?

In my opinion, the worst thing a Clyde can do is shave ounces off their bike. Light weight wheels will fail. Some of them post a weight limit and it is often less than 100 kg for bike and rider. The OP is way over that.

Many of the current carbon fiber frames are designed for a much lighter person. Some post a weight limit. Others don't, but a frame meant for a lump like me or the OP will need to be very stiff. And sadly either use fancy materials and be expensive, or be heavy.

Saving weight at the expense of strength is a fools errand for those of us in the Clydesdale camp. My first bike as an adult went in the bin after a year and 10,000 miles because you could see the impending failure of the chain stays from metal fatigue. But it was light!

My current summer bike is a Peugeot CFX-10 61 cm top tube (531 Reynolds) I bought new in 1982. I run Conti GP4000s II 700cX25. Rims are DT Swiss TK540, 36 spoke. Hope hubs. Ten speed Campy gears in back Mavic Starfish in front, Campy derailleurs, Simplex shifters and Dura-Ace 7800 brakes.

Full up with a spare tube, pump, tool kit, lights, cycle computer and phone mount it weighs in at about 23 lbs. That bike has over 50,000 miles on it.

Ditching the lights, tools, spares, substituting lighter brakes, and some light wheels might shave 5 lbs. Don't do it! Unless you are racing in a "no cars" environment, sacrificing brake power for weight is a bad idea. I need my lights, spares and pump. And light weight wheels will fail under me or anyone over the design limit of the wheels.

A Ti or carbon frame might weigh at most a couple pounds less. Maybe a Ti BB axle from Phil Wood? Really??? That BB would run me over $300 for a couple ounces. And it is not going to make me enjoy cycling a bit more.

My MTB is a Lynskey Ti Ridgeline size XL with 27.5X2.80 tires on Hope hubs with WTB Asym i35 rims. SRAM 1X11 gears. A Brooks leather saddle, because I have broken 2 composite saddles in sub-zero weather. And big Hope brakes and 180 mm disks. It weighs in at 24 lbs.

It is my winter commuter, and I got Ti to prevent rust, not for light weight. It replaced an old steel Ritchey 26 inch tire MTB that was lighter, but was starting to rust.

Lighter brakes and ditching the winter hand guards would subtract a couple pounds. Carbon crankset in place of the alloy? Carbon fiber Derailleur? Carbon forks to shave off a some weight? I might save a couple of pounds but I would not make it any more fun to ride.
 

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my old bike weighed ~16.5 lb, my new one ~15.5...more importantly, last year I was ~245 now ~200 and still going. I know which counts more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
a few thing i'd like to clarify. I like steel frames. my last 7 bikes have been cro mo. also, yes i'm a bit over weight but not fat, fat, pretty thick. runningback thick. I can still squat 680 pounds and at 53 years old, push up 407.5 on the bench. yes, I am beautiful at 200 flat but i'm not what one would call morbidly obese. I don't really know the advantage of cutting my bike down to 18 pounds. as a newbie to road I see and hear a lot of guys talk about their bike's weight. I live about 100 feet from a brand new 2.2 mile boardwalk so I see all the same guys all the time. maybe i'll get back down to 200 before I worry about my bike's weight.
 

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To the OP, at 275 lbs body weight, what do you think that you're going to gain by making your bike lighter?
You're still lugging around 275lbs....
 

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I know it's not a light weight but my bike weighs 23.6 pounds, give or take an ounce or two. it's a 56cm steel single speed road frame that takes a wide tire.
It's a single speed. No reason to take weight off it. If you have problem on hills, get a bike with gears.

Proportionally speaking, your bike is 8.5% of your body weight. That's damn good. I would love if my bike was 8.5% my body weight. It'd be waaay under the UCI limit. My GF weighs 90lbs and her bike is 18% of her body weight.
 

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People talk about "rider weight" as being the one that counts, but I would respectfully disagree unless you are talking about massive differences- like losing 100lbs or something. Over the last decade, I've been as light as 147lbs and as heavy as 180lbs. At no point have I noticed a lick of difference in my riding by going up or down 30 lbs. I don't even notice a significant difference climbing.

However, I notice a massive difference between switching from my 35lb commuter bike to my 18lb road bike. It's a much bigger difference than twice as much body weight. Geometry is ever so slightly more aggressive on the road bike- but they are both drop bar bikes similarly sized. I think wheels are where it really counts. The commuter has absurdly heavy wheels, while the road bike has a pretty light wheelset. The road bike feels so effortless getting up to speed by comparison. I think there's also something about the difference between "dead" weight and weight that is on you.

There's a similar phenomenon with backpacking. Gain 30lbs, and you won't notice much of a difference walking around. Put on a 30lb pack, and you are going to feel very weighed down. Or, try running with a 30lb pack- most couldn't sustain such a thing for any significant length of time. But I bet you could still run fine if you gained 30lbs.

That said, if OP is 275lbs, the 100lb weight loss example probably does apply. Plus, if you weigh 275 lbs, you can't safely switch to lightweight bike components- you need stuff that will hold up to the weight without breaking.
 

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Total weight is what counts -- there are actual some people who cannot reduce their weight without negative effects.
This is true. I have been down to as low as 137 pounds and I think I'm a stronger rider (both more power [though still not all that much!] and more endurance) and even a better climber when I'm at about 142-144 pounds. When I'm under 140 I feel weaker on the bike and I'm more likely to bonk on rides of over 6 hours.

(I'm just a bit shy of 5' 11".)

That said, even if I shed a pound off the bike, I still wouldn't be all that fast. :D
 
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