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this should probably be a no-brainer for anyone that's ever taken an allen wrench to their bike, but always remember to loc-tite your bolts. shortly after i started riding to work, the single-arm attachment of my rear rack to the seat stay came undone while riding home, sending the rack (with my bag & laptop) pivoting behind the rear wheel and dragging behind me. i only am using one arm of the rear rack to attach to the seatstays because of clearance issues with the rear brake. swapped out a bolt from the second bottle braze-on, and back home. immediately loc-tited the bolt afterwards. now you'd think i'd be smart enough to go through the ENITRE rack set up and do the same, but NOOOOO! i'm not that smart and this morning, the attachment of the rack arm to the rack itself worked itself loose, again sending the entire rack & bag load crashing behind me. i guess it's lesson learned. third time will NOT be a charm. at least both incidents happened in traffic-friendly areas.
 

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No loc-tite, at least not the red loc-tite. There a purple loc-tite that is meant for pieces that will be disassembled.

I would try and use a star washer or nylon lock nuts before I would use loc-tite. In all my years of wrenching on bikes I have never had to use loc-tite on anything.
 

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rockpharmer said:
this should probably be a no-brainer for anyone that's ever taken an allen wrench to their bike, but always remember to loc-tite your bolts. shortly after i started riding to work, the single-arm attachment of my rear rack to the seat stay came undone while riding home, sending the rack (with my bag & laptop) pivoting behind the rear wheel and dragging behind me. i only am using one arm of the rear rack to attach to the seatstays because of clearance issues with the rear brake. swapped out a bolt from the second bottle braze-on, and back home. immediately loc-tited the bolt afterwards. now you'd think i'd be smart enough to go through the ENITRE rack set up and do the same, but NOOOOO! i'm not that smart and this morning, the attachment of the rack arm to the rack itself worked itself loose, again sending the entire rack & bag load crashing behind me. i guess it's lesson learned. third time will NOT be a charm. at least both incidents happened in traffic-friendly areas.
lock ring washers maybe??

 

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Blue loc-tite on anything that might vibrate loose. Don't listen to these purists. :)
 

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rodar y rodar said:
Why the controversy here? Is there some potential problem from using a low-strength thread locker on a bike frame? MB1, are you opposed to using it on a certain frame material?
I'm against using loc-tite on any frame material.

First of all the correct torque plus a lock washer will keep any bolt in place. Secondly I don't think there is any frame material that I haven't seen a bolt seized in place and some poor schmuck in a bike shop has to try to get it out.

Just don't like the stuff for bike frame uses.
 

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Fair enough, I suppose. There are certainly things I just plain don`t like. I don`t have a lot of experience in bicycle mechanics, but I do frequently use blue 242 Loctite on small screws subject to a lot of vibration in other applications (I`m a printing press mechanic) and haven`t ever reason to suspect it as the culprit for seized screws. Never know, though.
 

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Actually Loctite prevents rust and corrosion as it seals the thread. I have not really ever seen it "seize" a bolt and that is with about 30 years in Plant Engineering. You can always get it off including the "red" stuff. Just apply heat. In most cases people don't clean the threads properly or use the proper primer prior to putting Loctite on, which makes the bond weaker. I believe that 2440 (Blue) does not need the primer. And in 2760 (red) does not need a primer.
 

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I think Loctite is pretty useful stuff. I've used it on my bikes, but only in certain instances. One of my bikes has an Italian BB that kept coming loose. No matter what I did, it kept coming loose. Yes, I put grease on the threads. Yes it was torqued to the correct specs. I put some blue Loctite on it and ta daaa. Fixed. I've been using it on that particular bike for years without a problem. I do my own repairs. It's easy to disassemble. The only other place I've used it on a bike is to fasten a light to my rear rack. I had to McGyver the setup in the first place, and the Loctite has held up well.
 

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I have only used blue loctite for the bolts that fixed fenders to the ends of fender stays (in anticipation of extreme vibration.) I did it on first assembly as I didn't want to learn the hard way that the bolt & locknut were inadequate. I don't use it anywhere else on a bike. I have a set of wheels that were assembled with some kind of spoke thread compound. I don't like these as they are very difficult to true (the spoke keeps on turning and turning and turning.)
 

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The green "automotive grade" is great for keeping derailleur adjusting screws from moving on you. It's the one for post-assembly thread locking so you can dial in your adjustments & then apply it. It's easily disassembled.
 
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