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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The 2009 Windsor Knight is fully kitted with a complete Shimano Ultegra 6600 shifter/derailleur group. Even the front derailleur is Shimano Ultegra 6600 where other companies may skimp. Check the Truvativ crankset, Kinesis PRO Carbon Fiber fork, Ritchey bar, Ritchey Stem and FSA FR-270 Carbon seatpost.

PLUS FREE FACTORY UPGRADE Vuelta XRP PRO Wheelset

PLUS FREE CLIPLESS ROAD PEDALS
Trying to figure out what shoes to buy for these pedals? Get a shoe that has a two-bolt/spd pattern.

The frame is carefully handmade by Windsor's master builders from select 6061 Kinesis Aluminum tubing that is double-butted for light weight and enhanced ride quality.

Main Frame Windsor Select 6061 Series DoubleButted Aluminum, Double water bottle mounts
Rear Triangle Windsor Custom butted and Tapered 6061 series Kinesis Aluminum, Windsor forged road dropout with replaceable derailleur hanger
Fork Kinesis Carbon Fiber PRO Series, 1.125 inch steerer tube
Crankset TruVativ Elita GXP GigaXpipe 30/42/52 - Special Black Finish
Bottom Bracket TruVativ GXP integrated external bearing
Pedals/Cleats Bonus Road clipless pedals (compatible with all two-bolt sole pattern shoes)
Front Derailleur Shimano Ultegra 6600, clamp-on, 31.8mm for triple
Rear Derailleur Shimano Ultegra 6600, 10-speed
Shifters Shimano Ultegra 6600, 10-speed, Flight Deck compatible
Cassette/Freewheel Shimano CSHG5600, 10-speed, 12-25T (30 gears total)
Chain Shimano CN5600, 10-speed
Front Hub Vuelta Pro Precision sealed bearing Road, Black
Rear Hub Vuelta Pro Precision sealed bearing Road, Black
Spokes Stainless bladed black finish
Rims FREE FACTORY UPGRADE to handbuilt VUELTA XRP (as shown)
Black W/CNC Sidewalls
Tires Michelin Dynamic high pressure road, 700 x 23c, presta valve tubes
Brake Set Tektro Aluminum calipers dual pivot (black finish)
Brake Levers Shimano Ultegra 6600 STI (integrated with shift levers)
Headset Threadless Ritchey Sealed Bearing 1.125 inch threadless
Handlebar Ritchey Ergo Road, 6061 Aluminum 26.0 clamp
Stem Ritchey Logic Comp Road 1.125 inch for threadless steerer
Tape/Grip Windsor CustomCork wrap Black
Saddle Windsor Racing with Cro-Moly rails
Seat Post FSA FR-270 Carbon, Black Carbon Weave 27.2
Seat Clamp Windsor Ultralite alloy, 31.8mm, Lazer etched
Sizes 50cm, 52cm, 54cm, 56cm, 58cm, 60cm, 62cm, 64cm Geometry Sizing Chart

This bike comes 90% assembled.
We suggest you take it to your local bike shop for final assembly & safety checks.

OK so I'd like your impressions on this setup. I have not ridden in probably 15 years ? I will be doing only road riding, sometimes with a group of people where I work, sometimes alone. Would like to get a bike that's "better than entry level" so I'm not jonesing for a different bike by the end of summer. They sell this bike for $899, no tax or shipping fees.
 

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stevesbike said:
Rule #1 of bike forums: never make your first post a 'question' about bikesdirect that looks more like an ad for the bike. You are either going to be ignored or ignite the nth flame...
Disregard that statement. A lot of us realize that it is logical for beginners' posts on an internet forum to ask about some of the cheapest, most well equipped bikes being sold on the internet.
 

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It's an ok deal but by no means a great deal.

There is NOTHING about that bike that will keep you jonesing for another. It's got a decent core build (ultegra) but otherwise it's nothing special.

The "Jones" is seldom about the Bits. It generally about the name on the frame and or the wheels.

If you think you are the type that will be jonesing for something "better" than you should consider a more respected brand upfront.

Check you local Lemond dealer for blowouts since Trek is dropping the Line. Or, do a little more research and go used.
 

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The BikesDirect bikes almost always look like a good deal on paper. Note that "Windsor" and "Bonus Road" are house brands; there's a lot of puffery there. The biggest risk is the obvious one, that you're buying a bike sight-unseen and you may not like the way it rides or the way it fits or other aspects that just don't show on paper.
 

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russotto said:
The BikesDirect bikes almost always look like a good deal on paper. Note that "Windsor" and "Bonus Road" are house brands; there's a lot of puffery there. The biggest risk is the obvious one, that you're buying a bike sight-unseen and you may not like the way it rides or the way it fits or other aspects that just don't show on paper.
I don't see much puffery there. Almost all the parts on it are name brand, save for stuff like the saddle and seatpost clamp. The former is going to be personal preference for anyone, and the latter really doesn't matter at all as long as it functions.

I totally agree with you on the way it rides. Not being able to test ride one is a sacrifice you make for the price. You could also ask around locally to see if anyone has one you could ride.

As far as the way it fits, there really isn't much that doesn't show up on paper there. The geo. chart is fairly all encompassing. Now not knowing how to interpret it is a different matter entirely, but that's why I recommend a fit at a local shop. They can let you know what kind of top tube length you need, allowing you to select the right size, and then set it up correctly after you get it.

Therein lies to conundrum with bikes direct, and why I don't recommend them to beginners without a shop's expertise to rely on. They appeal to the beginner bargain shopper, but they are best purchased by someone who knows what geo and size and components work for them.
 

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SleeveleSS said:
I don't see much puffery there.
The puffery is stuff like "The frame is carefully handmade by Windsor's master builders from select 6061 Kinesis Aluminum" and especially (from the web page, not the post) "We scored a super deal on a very small shipment of 2009 Windsor Knights". Stuff like that irritates me. It may be "handmade" in that the welds aren't done by machine, but it's almost certainly put together on an assembly line, and calling the factory workers "master builders" is a stretch. And they work for BikesDirect or its parent company, not some separate organization called "Windsor", there's no scoring of super-deals here.
 

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russotto said:
The puffery is stuff like "The frame is carefully handmade by Windsor's master builders from select 6061 Kinesis Aluminum" and especially (from the web page, not the post) "We scored a super deal on a very small shipment of 2009 Windsor Knights". Stuff like that irritates me. It may be "handmade" in that the welds aren't done by machine, but it's almost certainly put together on an assembly line, and calling the factory workers "master builders" is a stretch. And they work for BikesDirect or its parent company, not some separate organization called "Windsor", there's no scoring of super-deals here.
I concur with every bit of that. Stuff like that, and their continued use of integrated headsets on some of their models, are things that are easily changed, but bikesdirect obviously doesn't want to. I mean, it's hard to blame them, because I'm sure Mike is still making a good living. Why change what works? :thumbsup:

Bikesdirect isn't perfect by any stretch, but I'm glad their out there as an option.
 

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Ok I'll bite then. It's not really all ultegra: the second most expensive item in the group is the crankset, which isn't included. Instead, there's a low-end truvativ triple that you can pick up new for under $100. The brake calipers are low-end tektro not ultegra. The wheels are 'factory upgrade' from what? Vuelta XRP (road comps?) are over 2100 grams. Lots of complaints out there about these wheels. The tires are $10 ones. You can pick up a 26.0 bar/stem combo for little since most are switching to 31. The frame costs probably $50 wholesale to source.

So, what you're really getting is ultegra shifters, derailleurs hanging off a cheap frame with a bunch of other cheap parts...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
SleeveleSS said:
Good deal. Pay for a fit at a local shop. Do you need the triple (where do you live, what is your fitness)?
I'm fairly fit but perhaps weakest in the cardio department. I've been lifting weights for some time so strength is not an issue - but I expect I'll get winded easily. I live in western NY so there are plenty of hills if you pick a particular route. Do you suggest a double ? I did OK with ten speeds back in the day, so 18 or 20 would be all right.

To all - thanks for the replies... I guess I expected some level of controversy. BD is kinda like Sears - don't buy their stuff at "regular price" 'cuz it's always on sale. And saying "we got a great deal from the factory" is shady since they ARE the factory. Are there name brand bikes with similar or better equipment out there at similar (or better) prices ? I'd be happy to buy a more mainstream name if it's comparable - that will make it easier to sell someday if I want to do that.

Rick
 

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wny.rider said:
I'm fairly fit but perhaps weakest in the cardio department. I've been lifting weights for some time so strength is not an issue - but I expect I'll get winded easily. I live in western NY so there are plenty of hills if you pick a particular route. Do you suggest a double ? I did OK with ten speeds back in the day, so 18 or 20 would be all right.

To all - thanks for the replies... I guess I expected some level of controversy. BD is kinda like Sears - don't buy their stuff at "regular price" 'cuz it's always on sale. And saying "we got a great deal from the factory" is shady since they ARE the factory. Are there name brand bikes with similar or better equipment out there at similar (or better) prices ? I'd be happy to buy a more mainstream name if it's comparable - that will make it easier to sell someday if I want to do that.

Rick
I think that a triple sounds fine for you, especially with a lack of cardio base. I had a triple on my first bike, and while I was ready to upgrade to a double on my second, I didn't really regret having the triple while I was getting into the sport. There are not really any name brands I can think of a better prices, but if that's what you want, go for it. If you're more confident in something that says Trek than something that says Motobecane (or Windsor), then it's only gonna take some more money. In the end, don't by a bike your aren't going to love, even if the reality is you could've gotten the same bike for less. It might be easier to sell a name brand, but consider that your are going to try to sell it for more to recoup the same percentage of what you paid for it originally. You can buy the Moto for cheaper, therefore you can sell it for cheaper in the end. Best of luck.
 

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Windsor.

russotto said:
The puffery is stuff like "The frame is carefully handmade by Windsor's master builders from select 6061 Kinesis Aluminum" and especially (from the web page, not the post) "We scored a super deal on a very small shipment of 2009 Windsor Knights". Stuff like that irritates me. It may be "handmade" in that the welds aren't done by machine, but it's almost certainly put together on an assembly line, and calling the factory workers "master builders" is a stretch. And they work for BikesDirect or its parent company, not some separate organization called "Windsor", there's no scoring of super-deals here.
I rode the Windsor Shimano Soria purchased from BD from a friend of mine, and it rode like the Scattante XRL from Performance. I think the frame is stiff and comfy, and if well fitted, it will deliver a satisfying and rewarding road ride experience to you, even with the cheap wheels. Change to Neuvations M28 Aero 2's and you will not regret it.
I thank Mike @ BD for promoting and making the great sports of cycling accessible to so many avid cyclists. Hey Mike, thanks for the Vuelta Carbon tubular wheels, I am able to keep up and finish with the fastest riders in my Wednesday and Saturday fast rides! :thumbsup: ru1-2cycle
 

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yeah but when there's what...6? shimano component choices and thousands of wheel and frame choices, its easier for beginners to pick out what a good component group is compared to a frame or wheel. I fell for the same trick when I was first buying, and it's what BD probably makes a good portion of their money off of.
 

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sharkey00 said:
Personally I feel these bikes put their money in the wrong places. IMO the frame and wheelset is the most important part of the bike. They effect your riding experience. The components just move the chain around.
Well, you can get a nice 3/2.5 Ti bike with Ritchey WCS wheels from them, but I see your point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
livin4lax09 said:
yeah but when there's what...6? shimano component choices and thousands of wheel and frame choices, its easier for beginners to pick out what a good component group is compared to a frame or wheel. I fell for the same trick when I was first buying, and it's what BD probably makes a good portion of their money off of.
Well said. It's not obvious at all to me (the newbie) what to look for in a frame, or even if I get on a bike and ride around the LBS lot I may not notice the differences that will cause me pain when I really get riding. Any advice there would be appreciated.

My hope is to spend between 800 and 1000 bucks and wind up with something that I won't be wanting to replace at the end of the summer. That might be too much to hope for, I guess. Given that price range, can anyone suggest a sensible way to split up the budget - like 50% on the frame, 25% on wheelset, 25% on drivetrain, etc ?? (oops, no money left for brakes or seat or handlebar)

Thanks
 

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wny.rider said:
Well said. It's not obvious at all to me (the newbie) what to look for in a frame, or even if I get on a bike and ride around the LBS lot I may not notice the differences that will cause me pain when I really get riding. Any advice there would be appreciated.

My hope is to spend between 800 and 1000 bucks and wind up with something that I won't be wanting to replace at the end of the summer. That might be too much to hope for, I guess. Given that price range, can anyone suggest a sensible way to split up the budget - like 50% on the frame, 25% on wheelset, 25% on drivetrain, etc ?? (oops, no money left for brakes or seat or handlebar)

Thanks
As far as the frame goes, are there better frames out there? Sure. Are bikesdirect aluminum frames as good as most other aluminum frames? Sure, they are probably made in the same factory as many other name brand aluminum frames. There are frames of other materials that are nicer, but as far as aluminum goes, these are nothing special but not bad either.

For wheels, as a beginner you just need something foolproof. These wheels may not be as light as others, but you shouldn't be breaking spokes or need to true them every week. Wheels that you don't have to worry about should be first on your list, not wheels that are light at the expense of durability and your time fixing them. Again, if you aren't gonna be satisfied with a bikesdirect bike because of the name, then don't get it. You should be plenty satisfied with its function, however, as long as it fits. Don't forget to get fitted before ordering and then have the shop set you up after. That's really the most important thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
SleeveleSS said:
As far as the frame goes, are there better frames out there? Sure. Are bikesdirect aluminum frames as good as most other aluminum frames? Sure, they are probably made in the same factory as many other name brand aluminum frames. There are frames of other materials that are nicer, but as far as aluminum goes, these are nothing special but not bad either.

For wheels, as a beginner you just need something foolproof. These wheels may not be as light as others, but you shouldn't be breaking spokes or need to true them every week. Wheels that you don't have to worry about should be first on your list, not wheels that are light at the expense of durability and your time fixing them. Again, if you aren't gonna be satisfied with a bikesdirect bike because of the name, then don't get it. You should be plenty satisfied with its function, however, as long as it fits. Don't forget to get fitted before ordering and then have the shop set you up after. That's really the most important thing.
Here's another Q from the newbie - what's different about a triathlon bike from a regular "road bike" ?
 

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wny.rider said:
Here's another Q from the newbie - what's different about a triathlon bike from a regular "road bike" ?
You should search around the internet and use the search function on this forum for a bit. You'll get a lot of answers to that question, then if you have any more specific questions I or someone else on here would be glad to answer them for you. The very short answer is Tri bikes are all about aerodynamics, and using different muscles for cycling so you still have the legs for running.
 
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