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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe I was trying to be someone I am not. I loved the speed and rush of a carbon fiber road bike. Seeing my avg speed increase was definitely a thrill. I was trying to push myself to align with type a rider i am probably not. I was never some elite athlete growing up, or even had a sport i was decent at. I took up cycling to get back in shape, and to get out of the house. I had gone on long rides on a bargain bike, my avg speed sucked sure but at that very moment i did not care.

Fast forward to last night; Just to explore my local area on my cx bike is a vastly different experience. I did not care about a set goal of a mileage, elevation gain, or even average speed. Just go down a dirt road, into a field across a decommissioned bridge and over a few down trees just to find another segment of pavement. I found some cool new areas i just raced by. It just felt right. Even on the approach home with a small leak in my rear tire, i didnt care if i was only doing like 12 mph on a flat piece of road. Biking just felt right again.
 

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When I was a teenager just getting into cycling on the road I found real joy just in the discovery of new roads and going places and getting satisfaction in "leaving it all out on the road". Years later I got into racing and caring about the numbers, blah, blah, blah. Fast forward to today, where I still do race some for fun, but it's been at least 5 years since I even had a computer on the bike. My happy place hasn't changed though, as it's still about going places, finding new roads, and feeling fit. I've never been any rock star as far as getting super results in racing, but that doesn't matter, and it's really not the point.

So, you've found a spark getting a cyclocross bike and some of the challenges and fun that it brings. Awesome. You sound like a perfect candidate to take up some mountain biking too. I'm guessing you'll like that too. I do all of them myself, and enjoy them each for slightly different reasons. I also just like variety. It's all "just riding a bike" to me, and I've never gotten the whole roadie vs dirt rider animosity.

Keep on keep'in on!

P.S. - Ditch the reflectors dude! :D
 

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That's part of the reason I'm wanting to get an adventure bike. Go anywhere, do nearly anything. It's all about enjoying the ride! Also why I love riding my MTB too.
 

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Cycling is as fun as you permit it to be. If you go back through the history of threads begun by Pitt you'll seen tons of responses by people telling him to stop worrying about every data point, every possible piece of equipment & just enjoy cycling while improving & getting fit. If you're the type to get bogged down in data to the point where it's a chore that will happen regardless of the bike you ride or the route you take. For some, all they have to do is leave the cyclocomputer at home for awhile & just ride. For others, it's a new bike. But if someone is obsessed with the data, all of these are just placebos & in the end they'll go back to the data collection.
 

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I mis-read your thread title the first several times I looked at it. I thought you said you're out of your nut. I'm sure that says more about me than you.

;-)

All the data I need about cycling comes down to two points: 1. I didn't wake up dead this morning. 2. I rode my bike today.

Whether I had fun or not is not a data point, because it's moot. If it wasn't fun I wouldn't do it.
 

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A buddy of mine was in the same boat: burnt out from training and being focused on numbers. He picked up a mountain bike a few months ago and loves it. Enjoy being on a bike again and exploring new places.
 

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Fast forward to last night; Just to explore my local area on my cx bike is a vastly different experience. I did not care about a set goal of a mileage, elevation gain, or even average speed.
You could've done all that on your road bike.

You did record your CX ride and upload it to Strava right? So you're still collecting data.

If you got in such a rut after a just a year of riding, I believe a new bike is just a temporary solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You could've done all that on your road bike.

You did record your CX ride and upload it to Strava right? So you're still collecting data.

If you got in such a rut after a just a year of riding, I believe a new bike is just a temporary solution.
Strava is like facebook to me. Its more about logging where I have been, and its a good tool for me to track bike milage for repairs and such.

Also i link relive to it so i can have a little film of the adventure. About collecting data, all i am doing is looking at it.
 

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If you got in such a rut after a just a year of riding, I believe a new bike is just a temporary solution.
Yeah.

Cycling is my drug of choice. I ride 4 to 6 days per week for 11 months of the year. I consciously take a month off (Jan or feb) to make sure I have a mental and physical break. But, I completely understand that others may have different feelings.

In the past, I have gotten burned out - multiple years of racing/training while employed as a shop mechanic got to be too much bike.

Do what is right for you. You can be a real cyclist and not ride your bike every day. If going for a ride on a given day feels like a chore, then maybe better to skip the ride. If looking at data leaves a bad taste or disappointment, then lay off it. Try not to lose sight of the fact that you ride for fun and fitness - not for a paycheck.
 

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It's been entertaining (in a good way) watching you evolve Pitt. Along the lines of what DaveWC posted, I think most new riders get caught up with measuring every data point possible. I know I did; I was a slave to my computer and avg speed. I stopped using bar mounted computers of any kind a long time ago and I'm much happier for it... although I still run Strava in my pocket, of course :)

It's also natural to get burned out on the same thing. This is why many cyclists have more than one bike or even better, different bikes for different cycling disciplines. I discovered the joy of "all road" riding with a cx bike several years ago before this gravel grinding craze caught on... and I'm not surprised it did. It's tremendous fun to mix things up by going off the beaten path, exploring trails and dirt roads and having a different cycling experience.

You'll find riding your road bike more fun now too, and appreciate the efficiency and speed again.

I rotate between road, cx and mtb. They are all a blast to ride and the differences highlighted with every alternation. I hadn't ridden my cx bike in a couple weeks due to a mechanical I finally fixed, and I had an ear to ear grin riding it last night on my favorite local dirt loop.

Congrats on your new cx bike. Now get those wheels converted to tubeless and find a tire pressure that is a little soft but doesn't rim strike on every root and rock. No flats, better traction and a little more bump absorption will improve your cx experience even more.
 

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I think most new riders get caught up with measuring every data point possible. I know I did; I was a slave to my computer and avg speed.
I feel like I'm lucky I started riding when the most sophisticated data collection device for bicycles was a mechanical odometer that attached to the front hub. I did start using computers when they became available, and have had them on some bikes most of the time, and my son gave me a nifty Garmin unit a couple of years ago that I use on longer rides. It's fun to upload the track and look at the vertical.

But I don't "track" all my riding, and I never gave a fig for average speed. For a number of years I wrote down the miles on a paper calendar and added them up at the end of the month, but I stopped doing that a while back. So I guess I never became a slave to any of that.

But don't mis-understand me. I'm not criticizing or suggesting there's anything wrong with any of that. There are lots of ways to enjoy things.

Ride on, Pitt and the rest of you. Keep having fun.
 

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Tig, arai, and Dave all hit the same note. Lots of folks offered suggestions in older threads, based on their experiences, to allow for more recovery so you don't fry on cycling. You freightrained straight into the burnout they wisely cautioned against. If the comet model works for you, more power to you... If you want to continue to ride and improve and keep loving the sport you might need to learn how to recover, how to take breaks, how to make sure you love climbing on the bike. Have you read Friel's book? I think it's great that you are loving the CX bike! But past performance does often predict future results. When I got fat it wasn't because I was getting burned out, it was to be able to ride outdoors when it snows and I'm stuck with the trainer. But I do know what burned out feels like. It's an easy place to get to in cycling.
 

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Man, you make a lot of pronouncements. You will be back talking about Zwift and your training center in a few months.
 

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Hey Pitt, that's a kind of unique looking saddle to bar drop (or lack thereof). It almost looks like the bars are above the saddle? Maybe it's the pic? Or is it a CX thing? I don't have a CX bike so I don't have any comparison... (that's a great looking bike btw!).
 
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