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I'm sure I'm not the only shirt and tie guy who bikes, so I'm really interested in starting to bike to work. How do you guys pack/handle dress clothes so upon arrival, they don't look so wrinkled as if you slept in them? Are there special garment backpacks or tips you all could suggest? Most appreciated and thanks in advance.
 

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Cranky Old Bastard
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When I used to commute I'd take a weeks' worth of clothes in the car. Either on a day I didn't feel like riding or I'd drop them off when I was in town after work.

Otherwise I've seen some garment bags that might work.
 

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When I used to commute I'd take a weeks' worth of clothes in the car. Either on a day I didn't feel like riding or I'd drop them off when I was in town after work.

Otherwise I've seen some garment bags that might work.
That's what i do too. Can't stand a backpack or any other crap with me onthe bike.
 

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I ride almost every day to work. Don't use cotton and learn how to roll the clothes. Don't have anything heavy weighing on them in the backpack as well.

My clothes are never so wrinkled that a quick snap wouldn't get them back in order.
 

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I don't have to wear much more then jeans and a shirt, so I can probably get away with more...

But I have always folded clothing to normal size, stacked and then kind of rolled the whole thing. Since it is going to slouch when you try and stand it up, get it so its rolled up without wrinkling and you can tuck it into the bag firmly where it won't be able to slouch and wrinkle up.
 

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Garment bag pannier.

TransIt Garment Bag Pannier - Panniers / Rack Trunks / Handlebar Bags

Sorry, don't know how to post a picture of it. I used one when I commuted to work and needed nice clothes. It worked well for the short commute that I had (about 5 mi/20 min.).

Not sure that it works any better than rolling clothes - I never tried that.

Being smart about selecting your clothes (no cotton or linen, instead wrinkle free miracle fabrics) should also help.





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Some places like REI and LL Bean make "Packing Cubes" that keep your gear pretty tight. Also, "Wrinkle free" has come a long way. It used to look really shiny and cheap but certain brands make some really nice stuff now. I travel a ton for work and hate ironing. Brooks Bros. "Non-iron" and Jos A. Banks "Traveler's Collection" are my friends. For bike commuting, if you have an office, driving in one day a week and dropping off a bunch of stuff is the way to go. Also- don't forget stuff like socks and belts. I've done that way too many times bike commuting.
 

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When I ride to work I do a reverse commute, that is I bring my bike to work in the morning along with tomorrow's clothes, rid ehome and then back to work in the morning leaving my car at the office. This way I ride with only cycling gear and also have a car at the office. I'm fortunate that we have lockers and showers as well.
 

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It’s really not that hard. You don’t need a special bag like a garment bag. I wear wool dress pants, button down shirts (cotton), tie, belt, etc. I leave a pair of shoes at work because shoes are very bulky and I don’t want to carry those. But for clothes, just fold, then roll them up, and put in a bag/pannier/whatever. I use either a backpack (when I run to work) or a messenger bag (when I bike). I also put the clothes in a plastic bag (thicker plastic) in case it rains (my commuting bags aren’t fully waterproof) before putting it in the messenger or backpack.

I sometimes have to wear a jacket at work so I just leave a few there for when I need one.

So just lay out your clothes and roll them up. They won’t wrinkle for many, many hrs.
 

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The Stork
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Agree completely. I'll take my clothes into work on a Monday. I'm a brown bagger so I'll take food for the rest of the week into work too. Friday is take home day. Backpacks make me feel like I'm giving a kid a piggyback ride:(
 

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I'm sure I'm not the only shirt and tie guy who bikes, so I'm really interested in starting to bike to work. How do you guys pack/handle dress clothes so upon arrival, they don't look so wrinkled as if you slept in them? Are there special garment backpacks or tips you all could suggest? Most appreciated and thanks in advance.
On Fridays, I'd drive to work with my garment bag, to leave next week's fresh clothes, and drive back home with the previous week's soiled clothes. I'd hang my previously ironed shirts and pressed pants in a closet, where I kept an ironing board and iron, just in case. I'd always leave in time to arrive at work, just before anyone else. That way, I could wash before any witnesses arrived. I'd commute with the same shirt and trousers, weekly. My work shoes remained at work, always. Wash rag hung up next to my clothes in my closet. Kept deodorant, foot powder, tooth brush, mouthwash, and cologne in my drawer, at all times.
 

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I use a waterproof backpack and was just folding my stuff, which worked pretty well. But I had alot of stuff in the bag and thought it would be helpful to separate my clothes a bit. So I bought an Eagle Creek "packing folder" and although not totally wrinkle-free, it is good enough for me to pack it the night before, put it in my pack and go. My clothes look just as fresh after that as they do when I don't ride and take the train to work.
 

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I was another who took a weeks worth of clothes to work in the car. But pannier suit bags work just like suit bags you take on trips and the clothes do not come out all wrinkled. And in that vein, a $225 suit bag won't wrinkle the clothes less then a $90 one, but it probably would last longer but I doubt the more expensive one would last twice as long, probably closer to 25 to 33% longer tops.
 

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I use a waterproof backpack and was just folding my stuff, which worked pretty well. But I had alot of stuff in the bag and thought it would be helpful to separate my clothes a bit. So I bought an Eagle Creek "packing folder" and although not totally wrinkle-free, it is good enough for me to pack it the night before, put it in my pack and go. My clothes look just as fresh after that as they do when I don't ride and take the train to work.
I use an Eagle Creek shirt packer for business travel. I can fit several shirts and a pair of dress pants in it and it works great. Take your time folding, pack the night before, and your shirts will look fine the next day. It fits in a back pack or pannier. Use packing cubes for socks, ties, etc.

Eagle Creek Pack-It Folders and Travel Organizers | Eagle Creek
 
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