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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bought some new tires today (steel with the hardcasing) because I have been having so many flats lately. I go to install these things and everytime I am close to getting them on the rim the tube gets caught and they flat. I burned through 2 tubes today (plus 3 in the past week) trying to get these on, and I can't find my patch kit on top of that. I have no idea what I can be messing up since I have changed a flat tire hundreds of times over my life and these just seem too stiff to get on the rim, I have tried varying pressures in the tube and things of this sort to try and get the tube to stay put while mounting but nothing is seeming to work. Any advice out there?

-inflate tube to get a little shape
-stick in tire
-presta through hole
-mount one side
-mount other side (and in this instance get pinch flat)
 

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Try this. Inflate the tube just to the point where it just holds shape. Then, sprinkle and rub the tube over with baby powder. I find this usually stops the tube from picking up on the inside of the tire and allows it to seat more easily.
 

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LetsGoOutside said:
So I bought some new tires today (steel with the hardcasing) because I have been having so many flats lately. I go to install these things and everytime I am close to getting them on the rim the tube gets caught and they flat. I burned through 2 tubes today (plus 3 in the past week) trying to get these on, and I can't find my patch kit on top of that. I have no idea what I can be messing up since I have changed a flat tire hundreds of times over my life and these just seem too stiff to get on the rim, I have tried varying pressures in the tube and things of this sort to try and get the tube to stay put while mounting but nothing is seeming to work. Any advice out there?

-inflate tube to get a little shape
-stick in tire
-presta through hole
-mount one side
-mount other side (and in this instance get pinch flat)
My procedure:

- check rim strip and rim to make sure nothing is amiss
- check inside of tire for anything amiss
- mount one side of the tire
- insert the tube
- inflate slightly
- mount the other side of the tire
- inflate to about 70psi
- work tire back and forth all the way around to ensure it's properly seated
- inflate the rest of the way

On my rims with Conti Gatorskins I do not need tire levers to get the tire mounted. It's very tough the last 4 inches or so but I'm able to work it on.
 

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Here's another possible procedure.
1. definitely use fingers running along rim and inside tire to make sure there's no burrs, thorns, glass etc.
2. Put small pile of TALC, (powder must be talc, not cornstarch) in the palm of hand, drape tube over palm, close your hand, and use the other hand to pull the tube through the talc in the closed palm till the entire tube is coated. I'll also sprinkle talc inside the tire, making a small pile and simply rotate the tire, shaking it so the entire inside of the tire has a coating.
3. insert one bead of tire on rim, making sure the label of the tire is facing the drive side and the label is directly over the valve hole. This makes finding the valve easier.
4. Inflate tube just enough to give it shape, then insert valve in valve hole. Then install rest of tube.
5. Install the tire's other bead. I'll start at the valve, pushing it in a bit to make room for the bead. I'll do one side, going 180 degrees, then go back to the valve and work the other side 180 degrees till it's finished directly opposite the valve.
6. Now you can't see the rim strip. In order to see it, you'd have to push the bead/sidewall towards the center of the rim strip. Pinch the tire and tube with forefinger and thumb while rotating tire all the way around, letting the tire's sidewalls and bead slip along your fingers while observing closely for any tube that's squished under the bead on either side. Your fingers should touch nothing but the sidewalls and tire bead. If the tube is pinched, you'll feel it.
7. Inflate to about 10 lbs. Use both hands to squeeze the tire, as if you're trying to roll the tire and tube right off the rim, rocking it back and forth, perpendicular to the rim, making sure the bead is fully seated on the rim's inside lip. The rocking will make the tire pop into place if it isn't already. Usually tires will have a small strip of rubber just above where it meets the rim. Use this as a guide, making sure the distance from the strip to the rim is equal all the way around the circumference of the rim.
8. completely inflate the tire.
 

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Had some MB tires once that I gave up on...

Don't overlook the possibility that the tires are defective, maybe out of tolerance at the low end of the size range. I bought a pair of Vittoria MB tires in a clearance sale a couple of years ago that seemed really tight. Like you, I've mounted many tires, and I thought I knew all the tricks. I broke five plastic levers on these, then bought a set of those cheap steel grocery-store levers and finally managed to force the bead over the rim. Couple of days later I had a flat and was absolutely unable to get ANYTHING under the bead to unmount the tire and fix the puncture. I ended up cutting the bead with pliers and throwing the tires away.
Take them back to the shop and say, "I can't seem to get these on. Could you show me how to do it?" and see what happens.
 

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Might be working with a tad too much pressure. As you are mounting the second rim and getting near the end of the job, the bead on the other side of the wheel needs to be able to sink into the rim to allow enough slack for the last few inches to stretch over. It you have too much pressure in the tube, the away side of the tire can't collapse enough to let that happen.

My technique: Mount one bead, inflate the tube by mouth (just the right amount), shove in the stem, seat the tube in the tire, roll it into the rim, and seat the second bead, starting opposite the stem, because that allows the opposite bead to sink into the rim fully. Getting near the finish, I 'massage' the tread from that starting point towards the stem, getting as much slack as there is available. Works on nearly every foldable tire I've used.

Nearly every wire bead I need to cheat and use levers on. There, make sure to have the cup side of the lever towards the tire, not the rim, and go slowly. Hook one to the spokes as an anchor, one to carefully roll the bead on, and one to help shove the tube out of the way if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the quick good replies. I took the tire into the shop and asked them if they could give it a go. They popped it on with one of the huge metal tire-levers, I am really disappointed in the tires for taking so much force to get on. Hopefully they stretch enough while I ride to become plyable.
 
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