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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's a solid, lightweight, and cheap seat-post?

I'm thinking 200ish grams, maybe from a not as well known manufacturer? Does this even exist or am I better off trying to snag something used off ebay? I've always trusted Ritchey WCS stuff but I don't know too much about seatposts. : /

For example, snagged a 120 gram 3TTT Ti stem on ebay for $20 used in perfect condition; a heavier carbon Deda Forza stem went for $120. The bling/aesthetics thing certainly mattered in this instance; I was wondering if you had any similar suggestions for seatpost shopping.

It's going on my race bike; just looking to get something quality for as little as possible, buy it and forget about it!
 

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Anti-Hero
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Gnarly 928 said:
Carbon Concepts. Got mine from the TriSports cat. online. For very light, Thompson. But Thompson's clamping system is pretty poor if you like to fiddle with angle and fore and aft seat position often.
Don Hanson
I agree with the Thompson option. I don't agree with the "poor" comment, though. It is a PITA at first, but once you get used to it, it's a very well worth it improvement over standard adjustment systems.
 

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p != b
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Becky said:
Thomson. Their two-bolt system is excellent for making very small adjustments, especially to saddle tilt. Single-bolt clamps are a pain.
Worth noting that simply using a two-bolt clamp doesn't necessarily make things any better - I have an oval concepts post w/ two bolt clamp that's even worse IMO than most single-bolts - at least most single bolts stay in the same adjustment as you tighten them down.

If you're looking to go cheap, Kalloy is the way to go. If you're willing to spend a little $$ (not CF $$$), then definitely thomson (pricepoint had them on sale for $65, shoulda bought more than one...)
 

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Polka Power
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Gnarly 928 said:
But Thompson's clamping system is pretty poor if you like to fiddle with angle and fore and aft seat position often.
Don Hanson
This is the first I've heard someone say this. I couldn't disagree more, the two bolt makes it quicker and far more accurate IMO. Angle is super easy to micro adjust, even has an indicator for visual reference. Fore/aft is easy, plus it doesn't screw the angle up when you do it (unless you just start randomly turning the bolts. Even then, the indicator can get you back to where you were easily).

Just wondering why you think that could be a "poor" system?
 

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Word of caution on FSA seatposts: Not a good product. First, they are rather easy to leave an indention with the clamp. Second, the seat clamp is lame-o. One bolt and a strange grip system that never really gets the seat in the correct position. I'm fed up with mine and thinking Ultegra pretty seriously right now.
 

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Becky said:
Thomson. Their two-bolt system is excellent for making very small adjustments, especially to saddle tilt. Single-bolt clamps are a pain.

+1 on the thomson except they are not the cheapest... I have never had any problems with the 2-bolt adjustment and I use one of those ball-end hex wrenches made by park which seems to work fine.

I do have them on 2 bikes, one of which is a long 410mm post almost at the min-insertion limit and its been working great for 5+ years of use on a mtn bike.
 

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Cannondale Fire

When I built my Cannondale this winter, I was looking for the cheapest way to get a light, carbon fibre seatpost. I found a Cannondale Fire post on e-Bay for 40$ + shipping. It ended up at something like 56$ to have it at my door.

The thing is a single-bolt post and it clamps well. It is about 200 grams for a 250mm x 27.2mm and it looks nice. The one thing against it : micro-adjustment of the angle is not so "micro". There are small teeth on both the clamp's craddle and bottom part, which makes it possible to change the angle only in discrete increments, which are more or less of a 2-3 degrees angle.

Otherwise, you could order from ProBikeKit. Their prorace stuff goes for dirt cheap, and if they have 'em in stock, their Campagnolo products are also inexpensive. 80$ for a Chorus seatpost, which includes the nifty Campagnolo seat tube clamp, and shipping is free.

Campy Chorus, out of stock : http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=L1069
Deda Blackstick under 120$ : http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=K1029
ProRace Carbon, 30$ : http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=A1175
No brand, 45$, not so light but 400mm, so you can shorten & shave weight : http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=K3139
 

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Roadie with unshaven legs
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When I 'upgraded' my carbon bike from the older-style American Classic aluminum seatpost to the carbon fiber Chorus one I actually added weight back on to the bike. The AC was about 12 grams lighter than the carbon and aluminum Chorus seatpost but the AC post looked out of place so I stuck with the Chorus. Those AC seatposts regularly come up on eBay for anywhere from $20 to $50 for a used one. Personally, I would get a 350mm mountain bike AC seatpost and cut 4" off the end, essentially making it into a 250mm road seatpost that is has almost no scratches on the shaft. It should look almost new after the cut.
 
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