Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,
Well I got my first flat today after about 600 miles of road riding. Of course I wasn't prepared so I was stuck hanging out on a back road for about 45 minutes until my daughter showed up to give me a lift home. I was at least smart enough to bring my cell. :) Anyhow, I want to become more self sufficient going forward. I swung by my local LBS and had them swap out the tube. They were even nice enough to walk me through all the steps of repairing a flat. My plans are to attempt a couple of mock flat repairs at my house to help reinforce what I've learned. I want to make sure that I'm fully prepared next time this happens. My LBS talked me into purchasing this CO2 repair kit which is really nice and compact. (I also picked up a spare tube)

http://bontrager.com/model/08304

Is anyone familiar with this product and can someone confirm whether or not this will support a presta valve? I'm assuming it's universal but I haven't been able to confirm that. I did take the valve piece out of the package and it does seem to lock onto the presta valve, but I wanted to confirm before using any of the CO2 cartridges. Thanks in advance!

- Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
Yep, that thing is great and will work perfect with your presta valve.

Just make sure you always remember to check inside and outside your tire for whatever might have punctured it. Too oten does one flat become two because of a small piece of glass we leace inside the tire.

If you are using a CO2 you might also want to invest in a small tire pressure gauge since it can be a little tricky getting the tire pressure right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
This is a pretty standard item. There are different makes and designs of cartridge inflators. As far as I know, there are no cartridge inflators for Schrader vales, but I could be wrong, and if yours fit over the Presta snugly, then it's made for it. Also, remember that, for the most part, a cart will not provide the same kind of pressure that a floor pump would, so depending on where you are, it might only be a 'get me home' fix...especially if you're on a fat tire bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
some manufacturers have integrated a pump and a co2 for that reason but you should still be able to get your pressure pretty high with a 16g cartridge in a 23c tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks MistC and bbronv! Yep, we went over the tire inspection process at the LBS. I plan to inspect the tire closely both inside and out prior to replacing the tube. Yeah I was a little concerned about NOT knowing the exact tire pressure, but the ultimate goal would be to just get me home. It probably would make sense to pickup a small gauge however. I'd hate to guess wrong based on feel, under/over inflate, and then end up with another flat before I got home. :) It really blew this morning because I was out on a nice 30 mile ride and I was feeling really good. I was probably less than 10 miles from home where I would normally start to pick up the pace and then it happened. The LBS diagnosed it as as a pinch flat. (snake bytes?) I'm not sure how that happened though because I was riding on on a fairly smooth surface at the time. (no pot hole, big bump, etc) I run Conti GP4000s at 105 PSI. (I'm 170lbs) I'm pretty sure I topped them off before my ride this morning but it's possible that I may have forgotten. I think I'm going to start running 110 in the rear and 105 in the front. I can't say I'm a big fan of the flat, but I guess I better get used to it learn how to deal with it. It was bound to happen eventually. Thanks again for chiming in.
 

·
still shedding season
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
I'd guess that maybe you forgot to check the air before you left - 170lbs at 105psi without hitting something 'memorable' doesn't sound very likely for a pinch flat. Maybe you forgot for a couple of rides? :)

Compare by feeling the air pressure in the other tire (that didn't have the flat), that'll get you close enough to get home. I don't use CO2 (have a small pump) but a lot of guys say a tube won't hold that stuff for long, so you may want to empty it out when you get home and re-fill with your pump. I should pickup a CO2 thingy; usually I only get flats in mosquito-infested areas or when I'm racing home to beat a storm (pumps are a little slow in comparison).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
kykr13 said:
I'd guess that maybe you forgot to check the air before you left - 170lbs at 105psi without hitting something 'memorable' doesn't sound very likely for a pinch flat. Maybe you forgot for a couple of rides? :)

Compare by feeling the air pressure in the other tire (that didn't have the flat), that'll get you close enough to get home. I don't use CO2 (have a small pump) but a lot of guys say a tube won't hold that stuff for long, so you may want to empty it out when you get home and re-fill with your pump. I should pickup a CO2 thingy; usually I only get flats in mosquito-infested areas or when I'm racing home to beat a storm (pumps are a little slow in comparison).

I suspect you're right. I did try and re-trace all my pre-ride steps this morning, but I don't recall topping off my tires, which I'm typically very good about. That being the case, I could have left the house at 80-90 psi as a guess. Yeah I was told that the CO2 pressure would only hold for around 24 hours. I would definitely plan on emptying out and refilling with my floor pump once I got home, or at least before the next ride. I had planned on picking up a conventional hand pump but the LBS guy told me it would be quite exhausting pumping 100-120psi into a new tube. I do plan on bringing 2-3 cartridges just in case I screw something up. If the CO2 system thingy doesn't work out, I'll go for a hand pump. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,544 Posts
Gauging

BillyK said:
It probably would make sense to pickup a small gauge however. I'd hate to guess wrong based on feel, under/over inflate, and then end up with another flat before I got home.
Likewise, you'd hate to push the gauge on and let a bunch of air out of the tire and not have another CO2 cartridge available. Stranger things have happened :) You can get pretty close with a "calibrated thumb and forefinger squeeze."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,606 Posts
bbronov said:
This is a pretty standard item. There are different makes and designs of cartridge inflators. As far as I know, there are no cartridge inflators for Schrader vales, but I could be wrong, and if yours fit over the Presta snugly, then it's made for it. Also, remember that, for the most part, a cart will not provide the same kind of pressure that a floor pump would, so depending on where you are, it might only be a 'get me home' fix...especially if you're on a fat tire bike.
And/or carry one of those little adaptor things (or whatever they are called) that allows you to use a Schrader pump so you can stop at the next gas station and use air from the car pump. They're tiny and cheap.
I've actually never used mine but it seems like a good idea, theoretically anyway, considering how very easy it is to carry one.
 

·
Colorado Springs, CO
Joined
·
629 Posts
BillyK said:
Greetings,
Well I got my first flat today after about 600 miles of road riding. Of course I wasn't prepared so I was stuck hanging out on a back road for about 45 minutes until my daughter showed up to give me a lift home. I was at least smart enough to bring my cell. :) Anyhow, I want to become more self sufficient going forward. I swung by my local LBS and had them swap out the tube. They were even nice enough to walk me through all the steps of repairing a flat. My plans are to attempt a couple of mock flat repairs at my house to help reinforce what I've learned. I want to make sure that I'm fully prepared next time this happens. My LBS talked me into purchasing this CO2 repair kit which is really nice and compact. (I also picked up a spare tube)

http://bontrager.com/model/08304

Is anyone familiar with this product and can someone confirm whether or not this will support a presta valve? I'm assuming it's universal but I haven't been able to confirm that. I did take the valve piece out of the package and it does seem to lock onto the presta valve, but I wanted to confirm before using any of the CO2 cartridges. Thanks in advance!

- Bill

The C02 cartridges are nice, but a few things to watch out for:

1) One you have cleared the tire casing for the thing that caused the flat (I carry a pair of tweezers because more often that not it's been a really small piece of glass or rock shard), give the C02 cartridge a little puff into the tire - just enough to make certain that the tube is up in the tire casing. I usually go around the whole and push the tire in to make certain the tube is set right.

2) If you put the C02 valve too far down on the presta valve, it won't allow that section of the tire to ride up into to the casing as it's inflated.

3) When you dump the C02 into the tube, it's best to do it in a couple of shots. As the pressure drops in the canister, so does the temperature. Enough to freeze the presta valve open. Look up the ideal gas law: PV=nrT Pressurizing the tire in a few shots gives the temperatures a chance to equalize.

4) I have found that a 16g C02 cartridge will fill up a 25C tire to about 110 PSI or so. At least enough to get you to a pump where you can drain and refill the tire. Yes, the C02 doesn't last long in the tire like regular air does so don't be surprised if you have a soft tire the next morning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
ColoradoVeloDude said:
The C02 cartridges are nice, but a few things to watch out for:

1) One you have cleared the tire casing for the thing that caused the flat (I carry a pair of tweezers because more often that not it's been a really small piece of glass or rock shard), give the C02 cartridge a little puff into the tire - just enough to make certain that the tube is up in the tire casing. I usually go around the whole and push the tire in to make certain the tube is set right.

2) If you put the C02 valve too far down on the presta valve, it won't allow that section of the tire to ride up into to the casing as it's inflated.

3) When you dump the C02 into the tube, it's best to do it in a couple of shots. As the pressure drops in the canister, so does the temperature. Enough to freeze the presta valve open. Look up the ideal gas law: PV=nrT Pressurizing the tire in a few shots gives the temperatures a chance to equalize.


4) I have found that a 16g C02 cartridge will fill up a 25C tire to about 110 PSI or so. At least enough to get you to a pump where you can drain and refill the tire. Yes, the C02 doesn't last long in the tire like regular air does so don't be surprised if you have a soft tire the next morning.


Excellent tip on the tweezers. Thanks! Since the 16G cartridges are good for ~ 110psi and my GP4000's have a max psi of 120, is it safe to assume that I can just empty the cartridge (via a couple of shots) into the new tube without a risk of over inflation? In other words, is it really necessary to inflate a little at a time, check the tire pressure with your hand, inflate some more, check, etc. I most likely won't be carrying a tire gauge and the ultimate goal will be to just get home. BTW, I would plan on an initial quick shot and then a recheck of the tire to make sure the tube isn't pinched. My LBS guy used the same approach. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
BTW, I plan on attempting a mock tube change hopefully this evening. I'm going to use the following YouTube video as my guide. (This is fairly consistent with what my LBS had taught me and seemed to be one of the better videos I could find on the subject matter)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wlt2xog9-9Q

Does this approach seem reasonable? Should I add/skip any steps?

Thanks,
- Bill
 

·
Squirrel Hunter
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
Practice

BillyK said:
...My plans are to attempt a couple of mock flat repairs at my house to help reinforce what I've learned...
Excellent idea! I am amazed at people alongside the road that have no idea how the tools in their bag work. When practicing be sure you know how to get the rear wheel on and off and how to properly close your quick releases.

Your repair kit should work although looked a little pricey if you paid full retail. I would add a patch kit to your little bag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Keeping up with Junior said:
Excellent idea! I am amazed at people alongside the road that have no idea how the tools in their bag work. When practicing be sure you know how to get the rear wheel on and off and how to properly close your quick releases.

Your repair kit should work although looked a little pricey if you paid full retail. I would add a patch kit to your little bag.
Yeah, I'm certain that I paid too much, but considering it may prevent me from being stranded out in the middle of nowhere, I figured it was money well spent. :) I'm sure I could have saved a few bucks though. In regards to the wheel, good point. I figure I'll practice removing/installing the rear wheel for a bit prior to attempting the flat repair. That's actually the part that I'm worried about the most. Seems relatively easy when I see it being done using a work stand in a video, but I'm afraid it won't be as simple out on the open road. I definitely need to nail that first before moving on. The kit does come with a patch kit, but for the time being, the plans are to just replace the tube and chuck the old. Only one challenge at a time. :)
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
A couple of thoughts...

While it's true that a tube inflated with CO2 will deflate noticably quicker than one inflated using a standard pump, the difference isn't so dramatic that you have to race home or to a gas station to reinflate it. You could continue your ride (for hours, if that's what you've planned) and you'll only notice a small decrease in pressure. But yes, before the next ride I'd suggest expending the CO2 and reinflating using a pump.

Also, while it's definitely advantageous to practice changing tire and tube, it's also wise to 'waste' a couple of CO2 carts to get a feel for using the inflator. I use the fill some, check, fill some more approach (checking by feel, as Kerry mentioned) and when there's sufficient pressure, I stop. No need to spend the cart just because there's still CO2 remaining. Then again, I don't ever inflate my tire to max PSI.

And on that topic, here's a guide (keyword, guide):
http://www.michelinbicycletire.com/michelinbicycle/index.cfm?event=airpressure.view

BTW, I agree with you on the topic of replacing rather than repairing the damaged tube. If I get a second flat then I'll patch, but given the choice, I'd rather be riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
You might want to consider carrying a mini pump as well as CO2, or at least carry extra cartridges. If you make a mistake with CO2 and don’t have an extra cartridge you’ll be walking.

The other afternoon on my way home from work I came across a woman walking with her bike. She relied on one CO2 cartridge and didn’t get it right. On the ride home I think I convinced her to carry a pump as well.

I have a Genuine Innovations Ultraflate, which will work with both Schrader and Presta valves. It screws over the Schrader valve and slides over the Presta. It uses threaded and threadless cartridges, so I can buy a box of 20 threadless cartridges at Wal Mart for the price of a few cartridges at the LBS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
seacoaster said:
You might want to consider carrying a mini pump as well as CO2, or at least carry extra cartridges. If you make a mistake with CO2 and don’t have an extra cartridge you’ll be walking.

The other afternoon on my way home from work I came across a woman walking with her bike. She relied on one CO2 cartridge and didn’t get it right. On the ride home I think I convinced her to carry a pump as well.

I have a Genuine Innovations Ultraflate, which will work with both Schrader and Presta valves. It screws over the Schrader valve and slides over the Presta. It uses threaded and threadless cartridges, so I can buy a box of 20 threadless cartridges at Wal Mart for the price of a few cartridges at the LBS.
+ 1 on the mini pump and CO2 inflator with a cup for threadless. That's the setup I carry. I never been stranded on road even with multiple flats.
 

·
Dreamer
Joined
·
147 Posts
seacoaster said:
I have a Genuine Innovations Ultraflate, which will work with both Schrader and Presta valves. It screws over the Schrader valve and slides over the Presta. It uses threaded and threadless cartridges, so I can buy a box of 20 threadless cartridges at Wal Mart for the price of a few cartridges at the LBS.
Thanks for the suggestion on this. Just checked out their site and videos and it looks like a really convenient product. And with the prices of a box of cartridges at Wal-Mart, that makes it really affordable to be prepared at all times. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
seacoaster said:
You might want to consider carrying a mini pump as well as CO2, or at least carry extra cartridges. If you make a mistake with CO2 and don’t have an extra cartridge you’ll be walking.

The other afternoon on my way home from work I came across a woman walking with her bike. She relied on one CO2 cartridge and didn’t get it right. On the ride home I think I convinced her to carry a pump as well.

I have a Genuine Innovations Ultraflate, which will work with both Schrader and Presta valves. It screws over the Schrader valve and slides over the Presta. It uses threaded and threadless cartridges, so I can buy a box of 20 threadless cartridges at Wal Mart for the price of a few cartridges at the LBS.

Excellent point. I practiced this evening using the CO2 inflater and it's definitely not fool proof. I also discovered that I wasn't that good at gauging how much pressure was in the tire strictly by feel. I'm now thinking about picking up a pump (with a gauge) and carrying the CO2 inflater with a couple of cartridges strictly as backup. (incase pump malfunctions or whatever) All my rides are solo at the moment so I'll feel a lot more secure knowing that I have a couple of systems onboard to replace a flat. Thanks for the tip.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top