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Tabachoy Boy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't usually post/lurk here, but I thought that some might be interested. I'm usually on MTBR's singlespeed board. Anyways, here's a pic of a ti cog that Brett Brown of Boone Rings CNC'd up for me. You strap it in place of a rotor on a disc hub, and you've made yourself a fixie hub.

Let me know if you want more pics or info.

ps - I don't work for Brett or Boone.
 

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Premium Member
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20,473 Posts
Drevil said:
I don't usually post/lurk here, but I thought that some might be interested. I'm usually on MTBR's singlespeed board. Anyways, here's a pic of a ti cog that Brett Brown of Boone Rings CNC'd up for me. You strap it in place of a rotor on a disc hub, and you've made yourself a fixie hub.

Let me know if you want more pics or info.

ps - I don't work for Brett or Boone.

Fantastic idea. How does it work?
 

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Tabachoy Boy
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20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dave Hickey said:
Fantastic idea. How does it work?
Get any ISO 6-bolt disc rear hub, and bolt this in place of where the rotor will go. For example, take the new Surly rear disc hub below:



On the left side, where the disc rotor usually goes, you bolt this cog on instead. On the threaded right side, you can either leave the freewheel off, or put one on and have a fixed/free wheel.

Why do this? Well, I usually ride mountain bikes (but I have a fixie Surly Crosscheck that gets miles). I have a Chris King Singlespeed Disc hub . When it gets cold, sometimes the Ringdrive (King's pawl mechanism) stops functioning properly, thus freewheeling in both directions. This cog allows me to run fixed (as a bailout) on a hub that wasn't designed for it. Also, I like playing around and run fixed on less technical dirt trails or on ice/snow.
 

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Drevil said:
Get any ISO 6-bolt disc rear hub, and bolt this in place of where the rotor will go. For example, take the new Surly rear disc hub below:



On the left side, where the disc rotor usually goes, you bolt this cog on instead. On the threaded right side, you can either leave the freewheel off, or put one on and have a fixed/free wheel.

Why do this? Well, I usually ride mountain bikes (but I have a fixie Surly Crosscheck that gets miles). I have a Chris King Iso Singlespeed rear hub. When it gets cold, sometimes the Ringdrive (King's pawl mechanism) stops functioning properly, thus freewheeling in both directions. This cog allows me to run fixed (as a bailout) on a hub that wasn't designed for it. Also, I like playing around and run fixed on less technical dirt trails or on ice/snow.
It doesn't look like it, but any chainline issues?
 

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Drevil said:
I don't usually post/lurk here, but I thought that some might be interested. I'm usually on MTBR's singlespeed board. Anyways, here's a pic of a ti cog that Brett Brown of Boone Rings CNC'd up for me. You strap it in place of a rotor on a disc hub, and you've made yourself a fixie hub.

Let me know if you want more pics or info.

ps - I don't work for Brett or Boone.
Hey Big D - I'm interested! So what is the cost on those bad boys?? Can I get a 20 or 21 toother?

Thanks
FF
 

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Tabachoy Boy
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Fast Freddy said:
Hey Big D - I'm interested! So what is the cost on those bad boys?? Can I get a 20 or 21 toother?

Thanks
FF
Freddy! What're you doing here? :p

$2.50/tooth + s/h, and I'm sure Brett can fire up something at those sizes.
 
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