Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I like Boonen more after this Paris-Roubaix. He handled himself well in defeat, didn't blame his team, took responsibility for his result, and gave full credit to cancellara. He also looked like he saved ballan from being splattered across the front of a high speed train, which is nice. Its easier to be a good winner than a gracious competitor. A great show by a great role model. I can see why the belgians love him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,561 Posts
Fignon's Barber said:
I like Boonen more after this Paris-Roubaix. He handled himself well in defeat, didn't blame his team, took responsibility for his result, and gave full credit to cancellara. He also looked like he saved ballan from being splattered across the front of a high speed train, which is nice. Its easier to be a good winner than a gracious competitor. A great show by a great role model. I can see why the belgians love him.
Yeah so far in his career he's conducted himself with a level of class rarely seen in professional athletes. Even the cocky statements he's made have been more telling it like it is than show boating.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
923 Posts
He has brought a lot of credit to the Rainbow Jersey - more than it's had in years, not just in terms of wins but also in terms of his attitude: no excuses win or lose.

I thought the way he rode yesterday - unafraid to take his responsibilities and do the work even when isolated - showed the mark of a true Champion.
 

·
Self-Banned
Joined
·
16,905 Posts
elviento said:
And the Avant Stiff + forks on the QS rides are among the best forks ever made too...;-)

It might have helped that their steering tubes for this race were made of steel too.
 

·
Yo no fui.
Joined
·
8,081 Posts
I'm almost glad Boonen lost . . .

Fignon's Barber said:
I like Boonen more after this Paris-Roubaix. He handled himself well in defeat, didn't blame his team, took responsibility for his result, and gave full credit to cancellara. He also looked like he saved ballan from being splattered across the front of a high speed train, which is nice. Its easier to be a good winner than a gracious competitor. A great show by a great role model. I can see why the belgians love him.
I agree completely. Even though I'm a big Boonen fan (who isn't these days?) and the cycling press has a serious case of blu-balls after the failed double-double, I'm almost glad that he lost. The last thing cycling needs, especially now, is to become another one man circus. See, e.g., the Armstrong era. Finally, it'll be great (hopefully) to see a bunch of accomplished classics riders fight it out for the next couple of years.
 

·
Self-Banned
Joined
·
16,905 Posts
Pablo said:
I agree completely. Even though I'm a big Boonen fan (who isn't these days?) and the cycling press has a serious case of blu-balls after the failed double-double, I'm almost glad that he lost. The last thing cycling needs, especially now, is to become another one man circus. See, e.g., the Armstrong era. Finally, it'll be great (hopefully) to see a bunch of accomplished classics riders fight it out for the next couple of years.

Even Boonen said that sometimes you learn more from losing than winning...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Fignon's Barber said:
I like Boonen more after this Paris-Roubaix. He handled himself well in defeat, didn't blame his team, took responsibility for his result, and gave full credit to cancellara. He also looked like he saved ballan from being splattered across the front of a high speed train, which is nice. Its easier to be a good winner than a gracious competitor. A great show by a great role model. I can see why the belgians love him.

I saw it a bit differently. As soon as he saw Hincapie fall, he moved to the front and started pushing the pace. Not too sportsmanlike if you ask me. I think the train was Karma....
 

·
Self-Banned
Joined
·
16,905 Posts
pappymd said:
I saw it a bit differently. As soon as he saw Hincapie fall, he moved to the front and started pushing the pace. Not too sportsmanlike if you ask me. I think the train was Karma....

You've got some things to learn about the classics; particularly a race such as Paris-Roubaix.
 

·
Resident Dutchbag
Joined
·
11,864 Posts
pappymd said:
I saw it a bit differently. As soon as he saw Hincapie fall, he moved to the front and started pushing the pace. Not too sportsmanlike if you ask me.
That's pretty much SOP.
 

·
Not Banned
Joined
·
49,013 Posts
Tom Boonen class, power and panache

so he's defending champ at R-V-V and he creates the decisive move on the Koppenberg, rides a great race and pulls the repeat. So he's now going for the double double (statistically unlikely) and what does he do?Again creates the decisive move at Arenberg.
Gotta love a guy who as the favorite is actually the one who animates the race.MOXY!

handles himself with class, faster than snot, chicks dig him, and a class act.

you wanna hate him but ya just can't.

I hope he takes the Green.
 

·
Back from the dead
Joined
·
20,626 Posts
pappymd said:
I saw it a bit differently. As soon as he saw Hincapie fall, he moved to the front and started pushing the pace. Not too sportsmanlike if you ask me. I think the train was Karma....
Gee, Boonen didn't stop when Hincapie fell a few years ago, and in that race they were on the SAME team! What a jerk.

(sarcasm)
 

·
Self-Banned
Joined
·
16,905 Posts
Tell Hennie Kuiper...

pappymd said:
Yeah, I know it's SOP, but it just seems a bit distasteful to win because someone else fell...

You might want to spend some time learning about the history of European pro cycling. It's Paris-Roubaix... People fall, get hurt, have mechanical failures and flat tires all day long. It's a war of attrition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,387 Posts
As others...

As others have said, it is a one day race, and pretty much anything goes. You don't stop and wait around for someone if they take a tumble, especially in PR, because there are a lot of falls, and mostly because it is part of the race. It actually has nothing to do with sportsmanship, and the "unwritten rules" in this case are far different than say a grand tour (where if the tour leader takes a tumble, most will wait, but only for the leader). Winning Paris Roubaix is normally a combination of luck, skill, and fitness.
 

·
Self-Banned
Joined
·
16,905 Posts
magnolialover said:
As others have said, it is a one day race, and pretty much anything goes. You don't stop and wait around for someone if they take a tumble, especially in PR, because there are a lot of falls, and mostly because it is part of the race. It actually has nothing to do with sportsmanship, and the "unwritten rules" in this case are far different than say a grand tour (where if the tour leader takes a tumble, most will wait, but only for the leader). Winning Paris Roubaix is normally a combination of luck, skill, and fitness.
...and having the right kind of steering tube. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,387 Posts
Indeed...

rocco said:
...and having the right kind of steering tube. ;)
Indeed, but for certain, Hincapie wasn't the only one riding an aluminum steerer that day methinks. Something happened to his that made is succeptible to breakage.
 

·
No team-cest unless 8+!
Joined
·
7,158 Posts
Fignon's Barber said:
... He handled himself well in defeat, didn't blame his team, took responsibility for his result, and gave full credit to cancellara. ... Its easier to be a good winner than a gracious competitor. A great show by a great role model...
Someone please tell that to McEwen. :rolleyes:
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top