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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of changing from my DA 7700 crankset to either THM-Carbones, Stronglight Pulsion CT2, or Zipp 300. How difficult will it be to remove the DA & replace? Is this something I can do, or should I just have my LBS do it? Any thoughts on the above 3 replacements - pros/cons. Thanks.
 

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Easy with the right tools

I've been riding for about 25 years and finally started doing my own work. I use a couple of different books (Zinn's and Park's) and the net along with the right tools. I find it very enjoyable to do the work. I once paid $150 at a bike shop to swap the parts from one frame to another. I thought that was crazy, so for about $50 worth of tools and a book I can do it myself.

Sorry, I'm not familiar with the cranks you mentioned but the Shimano crank/BB removal/install is easy.
 

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I agree with Semdoug

I'm also not familiar with the units you mentioned, but I've replaced bottom brackets twice - my mtb (shimano upgrade) and my road bike (campy to fsa). It's not that hard and the tools are cheap (I'm used to buying tools for cars). Just take it slow - Semdoug's adice on Zinn's and Park is right on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys.

I have most of the tools - but I may need to buy some special BB tools, - such as a diff. lockring wrench or two if the new BB uses diff. than DA. And I have several books, including Zinn, but I don't have special tools like thread facing & chasing tools, etc. After reading Zinn & Barnett's Manual, I got a little scared whether I might need to re-thread & chase the BB shell before installing the new BB.

Is the DA 7700 BB a cartridge or cup & cone? Thanks.
 

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rebounder
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i think

its a bad idea to start wrenching with $300 guinea pigs. thats what huffys and neighbors bikes are for. as a mechanic (and de facto spokesman for the LBS), i can tell you that the results obtainted by a professional versus a beginner are going to be very different. there are even very few home mechanics can consistently produce the same quality that you get from a good LBS. thats not to say you cant get it installed or working right, but someone who attends to the finest details of bikes on a daily basis has a better eye for the way something should be properly set up, and in the end will do a better job. details make the bike, and should be examined accordingly. its easy to look at a bike and tell when it has been expertly (professional or otherwise) maintained. and, like i said, it would be a shame to look at a bike with that setup and see otherwise.
 

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Beetpull DeLite
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SHVentus said:
Thanks guys.

I have most of the tools - but I may need to buy some special BB tools, - such as a diff. lockring wrench or two if the new BB uses diff. than DA. And I have several books, including Zinn, but I don't have special tools like thread facing & chasing tools, etc. After reading Zinn & Barnett's Manual, I got a little scared whether I might need to re-thread & chase the BB shell before installing the new BB.

Is the DA 7700 BB a cartridge or cup & cone? Thanks.
I really doubt you'd need to chase the threads on the BB shell...that's normally done on new bikes that might have gotten paint in the threads. Don't worry about that.

I'm not familiar with the other cranksets you mention...if they're of the integrated BB type, you might have to face the surface of the BB shell. That's simply a guess, I'd check with the crankset manufacturer.

I'd guess the DA 7700 BB is cartridge.
 

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naawillis said:
its a bad idea to start wrenching with $300 guinea pigs. thats what huffys and neighbors bikes are for. as a mechanic (and de facto spokesman for the LBS), i can tell you that the results obtainted by a professional versus a beginner are going to be very different. there are even very few home mechanics can consistently produce the same quality that you get from a good LBS. thats not to say you cant get it installed or working right, but someone who attends to the finest details of bikes on a daily basis has a better eye for the way something should be properly set up, and in the end will do a better job. details make the bike, and should be examined accordingly. its easy to look at a bike and tell when it has been expertly (professional or otherwise) maintained. and, like i said, it would be a shame to look at a bike with that setup and see otherwise.
Lets see, if a bike kit is spec'd properly what are the differences you can see between a rider
building/fixing his own bike up versus a LBS mechanic? Maybe wheel building/truing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for your responses.

I'm very detail oriented, a perfectionist, can follow instructions, and have most of the tools & books. I guess that I'm mostly apprehensive only because of my lack of experience in this field. I'd just hate to get into it & find that it's a big can of worms I hadn't expected or planned for &/or that I needed a tool that I didn't have.

Re-reading Barnett's manual, it said that facing tools for titanium are a special breed & often it isn't done because the tools are cost prohibitive. Hummmmmmmmmmm.

Any others that have done this? Their take? TJ, Kerry, etc. Thanks.
 

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Since you asked

SHVentus said:
Re-reading Barnett's manual, it said that facing tools for titanium are a special breed & often it isn't done because the tools are cost prohibitive. Hummmmmmmmmmm.
What Barnett's says is correct, but as several posters have noted, it is extremely unlikely that you would need to do any facing or chasing because your bike was already assembled and (presumably) working fine. IMO, if you have the proper tools (crank remover, BB tool) and mechanical common sense, this is a relatively easy job. As with the others, I'm not familiar with the specifics of your proposed new crank set, but I've not heard that there are any hidden surprises. And, of course, now is the time to ask why you feel there is any real reason to make such a change - you won't see any performance improvement over your DA set.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Kerry Irons said:
What Barnett's says is correct, but as several posters have noted, it is extremely unlikely that you would need to do any facing or chasing because your bike was already assembled and (presumably) working fine. IMO, if you have the proper tools (crank remover, BB tool) and mechanical common sense, this is a relatively easy job. As with the others, I'm not familiar with the specifics of your proposed new crank set, but I've not heard that there are any hidden surprises. And, of course, now is the time to ask why you feel there is any real reason to make such a change - you won't see any performance improvement over your DA set.
Thanks Kerry for your take,

Yes, I have most of Park's BB & crank tools. At least for Shimano. If the new BB is different, I may need a diff. lockring wrench. Yes, bike is working fine. It's a Merlin XTL. I just wanted to drop some bike weight & have that bike disease of upgraditis, wanting some more bling with the decreased weight. It may stiffen the BB/cranks too, but performance improvements weren't the primary reason, since the gain here will be marginal. Also debating whether to stick with DA9, or to switch to DA10 (cassette, STI, chain, der.).
 

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BIGchainRING
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Don't worry about it. Of course you need BB tools, but if you passed junior high shop class, I feel that you have the expertise to work on a bike. After I got tired of paying my lbs $12 a pop to true my wheel, I figured it out by myself. Now I am building my own wheels. Changing a bottom bracket/crankset is no more difficult than changing a brakeset.

Stay strong and make sure that your rides are always in top notch condition by servicing them yourself
 
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