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Officially a panniers noob now! I was planning on using these for groceries:

Max load is 14 kilos, which would allow me to carry around some heavier stuff like bottled water, oil, etc. Point is, will the bike be steady enough to load it when leaning against a pole
IMO there is no kickstand that will be reliable in holding up a loaded bike. Leaning the bike is a better solution.
 

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there's only one time i've ever wanted a kickstand -- when on the ferry and i didn't want to lay the bike down.

i like the idea of loading the pannier before placing it on the rack.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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When I first saw this I was thinking that would be a great idea idea it were retractable, then I saw that it folds. There have been times where I would loved to have one of these.

It is basically a custom cut tent pole, fitted with a cradle for a frame-tube and a foot pod. Unstrap it and shake it open. Folds just like a tent pole too, and strap it to a pannier rack or shove it into your jersey pocket. Guy who cooks them up is great and is based in the Pacific Northwest. The pannier/tandem rated one uses alloy tubestock rather than fiberglass.

Far more stable than anything that bolts to a frame, because of the geometry.
 

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Pathlete and Pedalphile
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It is basically a custom cut tent pole, fitted with a cradle for a frame-tube and a foot pod. Unstrap it and shake it open. Folds just like a tent pole too, and strap it to a pannier rack or shove it into your jersey pocket. Guy who cooks them up is great and is based in the Pacific Northwest. The pannier/tandem rated one uses alloy tubestock rather than fiberglass.

Far more stable than anything that bolts to a frame, because of the geometry.
It's like one of those Hurrycane's (as seen on tv) but for bikes, I like it!
 

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Lean the bike against something and wrap a rubber band around the brake lever and handlebar while loading the bike and the bike won't role during loading.
 

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Lean the bike against something and wrap a rubber band around the brake lever and handlebar while loading the bike and the bike won't role during loading.
This is what I do. I carry Velcro straps with me and use one of those instead but same principal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys. While I am not a huge fan of the kickstand as a concept, also because I wanted to be able to use this same bike for some mild off-road (indeed I've done so on 25 but wider tires should make everything better), I am also slightly concerned that I may not be able to find a convenient support of the appropriate shape to lean the bike against, seeing how the places I'd be shopping at will be car-centric (which one isn't?) and the few props available may taken by other bikes. So ultimately I decided to pick up the kickstand anyway.

But I'll give the elastic band trick a try: I've already used that one to set up brakes, so why not!
 

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I've got welded wire outside my baskets angle iron frame which keeps the bike from rolling when I lean it against a pole or shopping cart rack. If interested see picture in my introduction post under new new members thread under lounge. http://forums.roadbikereview.com/lounge/even-newer-new-who-you-thread-223334.html
Steel baskets will take 60 lb okay, after that the front wheel starts lifting unless I'm on the bike. Commercial steel baskets won't take a gallon jug, these will. The kickstand doesn't work anymore even empty, so if no poles I lean the basket on a car park stop or flower bed border. I never leave the bike unlocked however, so mostly there is a utility or traffic sign pole or fence. Front wheel bike racks don't work either with weight on the back.
I've never seen a pannier in four counties of this bistate area so I don't know what they work like or if they work. The saddle bag I had previously, ripped off the mount and hit the pavement. So I used steel wire. Other shoppers use a stolen 4 gallon milk jug bin bunji-corded attached to a book rack, but that won't carry a weeks worth of groceries.
Do panniers create more wind resistance when they are empty? Than an open steel rack? Do plastic panniers catch & hold rain?
I'm thinking of buying a yubacycle bodaboda, but it doesn't have a rack, it has optional hard plastic panniers. I don't want to go slower than what I've got already. I don't need 200 lb capacity unless I go touring. I could use the longer bodaboda frame that would stop bucking me over the handlebars chin first on obstructions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So that was my debut today! some surprises, funny moments, including rain and a strong wind which blew the trolley in motion :D lifting the damn anchor with one hand while holding the loaded bags in the other - but everything went fine otherwise.

It's heavy when walking it, and in motion I can sure feel the extra weight when trying to pick up speed quickly, but it will ride fine no hands!

The only problem is the shape of my rack won't allow ideal positioning, and the back of my feet would strike the panniers from time to time. Maybe I'll go take a look at new racks.

@indianajo, I'm sure the added surface isn't negligible in terms of drag, but I'm not going to ride fast anyway. Think I was doing 20-22 kph most of the time, though for the sake of science, I tried a brief acceleration out of saddle and hit the whereabouts of 30 (brief looks at the Garmin as I haven't downloaded the ride yet)

I'm not familiar with the bike mentioned, though the Big Dummy is pretty popular with shoppers AFAIK.

As for myself, I may consider adding more storage later if I'm happy with the arrangement. Most of the shops are within the range of a 10 to 20 minutes ride, so I'm fine with not having a huge carrying capacity, but the 2x20 liters set up I've tried today sure fills up fast.

The bike also has cheapo very long reach calipers with Ultegra (aka R55) pads (though with half an idea of switching to Tektro R559), so I'm not in any hurry to find out how well (bad) that set up deals with an emergency stop, loaded bike from a decent speed.

Ideally I'd nab a London Road from Planet X, but the cost of disc brake calipers and the need for new wheels makes that notion more expensive than I like, at that point I would be building it as a new, non-beater, bike instead of migrating the rest of the components.

The next step is getting a pair of those wide Vittoria Randonneur Hyper for some dirt road fun, when not shopping. Currently I'm using 23/25 which however did pretty fine today, which should probably surprise me less than it does, since people ride tandems on 25s...
 

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Contratulations on successful shopping by bicycle. Suprised the 25 mm tires held up. I use 55 mm, at about 55 psi or 3.2 bar.
Great at the 22 km/hr. I average about 14, down to 10 in a bad headwind. But I'm age 67.
My baskets are 2 x 31.7 L plus I tie baked goods etc in shopping bags on top. My heels do hit the bottom of the basket if I slide the ball of the foot on the pedal instead of the instep. My mount is custom so I could slide back but I do like the weight forward as possible so the front wheel doesn't lift.
The bodaboda has accessory 2 x 40 liter containers.
I've thought of an auxillary bin on the front, but the wind is picking up up these days with global warming, so probably not. I'm aerodynamically dirty enough. Felt like Kansas this May instead of placid Indiana.
Rim brakes feel okay to me with a good load, better stopping than a car anyway. But I have steel wheels.
Happy shopping & commuting.
 
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