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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been riding my MTN bike on and off for the past 10 years but lately I've been riding it more on road than off. I was getting tired of having to drive somewhere to ride my bike.

I found, what I think, was a good deal locally. I've always wanted a Cannondale and found a rather well off rider that was selling his first bike as he just purchased a Madone. I picked up a 2007 Cannondale Snyapse Sport 4. Bone stock except for a new upgraded front rim, an Aclass AKX R10 I believe it is. Paid $400 for it. Excellent condition with not a nick or scratch on it.

Amazing the difference between riding this and my 10 year old VERY heavy MTN bike. Need new pedals the seller just put on some cheap platforms he had in the garage so I could take it for a test ride. Should be ordering my pedals today and thinking about a carbon seatpost as well.

Cannont wait to start riding more, but not lookign forward to the upgrade bug to bite me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just returned from my first ride on it. New pedals are a MUST have. did 10 miles and using cheap platform pedals was very tough. Also going to take some getting use to the new riding position and that tiny seat.

Pedals and shorts will be ordered in a few minutes.
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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Congrats on the new bike.

Don't bother with a carbon seatpost yet (unless you're really into spending the money). Actually, I don't recommend upgrading anything on the bike except going to clipless pedals (which sounds like the plan already) for at least 1000 miles, with one possible exception.

You don't know the bike yet, and you don't know what you like or dislike about it. With 1000 miles under your wheels (should be easy to get this in a summer), you'll know how the bike feels, and where things just don't seem right. Maybe the bars are too wide. Maybe wheels feel squishy, or they're chronically out of round or out of true. Maybe the brakes don't work like you want, or shift lever effort is harder than you'd like. At the very least, you want to get a good sense of how the bike feels so if you make a change/upgrade you'll be able to tell the difference. Nothing is more frustrating than shelling out for a flash new part and discovering that you can't really feel any change.

There is plenty of money to be spent on seat bags, pumps, helmets, jerseys, shorts, shoes, socks, etc., so don't feel that your money will go stale in your wallet if you don't upgrade the bike right away.

Ride it. Get to know it.

The possible exception: Saddle. If your saddle is wrong, you'll know it after a few rides. Ride the same saddle every day for a week, take a weekend off, and get back on it on Monday. If it still kills your backside, you may need to find a different one. Which can be nightmarish and expensive. Borrow from anyone you can, and see if your local bike shop has a saddle testing program. Some do. These shops are called awesome.
 

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I agree with not upgrading just yet. 1000 miles for a road newbie maybe a lot, but really you should wait a bit. Just make sure your bike fits you and is adjusted well. Get used to road geometry and your body make up and muscle balance will change. After the first few hundred miles, you'll make more adjustments as you become more fit and used to road biking.

I played around with a few seatposts on my multiple bikes, and realized I needed zero setback on my edge racer, and slight setback seatpost on my Giant OCR. Again, stem sizes were slightly different too. Now both bikes are perfectly dialed in, because they have different geometries. Find your balance, and don't be afraid to make adjustments. As for carbon, I'm not totally sold on a carbon seatpost or handlebars yet (have have both aluminum and carbon on different bikes). Just make sure yours fits, and go from there.

Before going out and buying tons of different saddles and adding them to a pile, again, adjust yours and experiment. Test out your friends' pile of extra saddles or ones at your LBS. Thats how I found mine, a friend had an extra fizik aliante, and I'll never look back.

Pedals are definitely the best and most immediate upgrade. If its the upgrade bug that has you, and you are looking for best bang for your quick upgrade bucks, I think other than perfectly sized stems and such, in order of ability to upgrade your ride quality are saddle, tires, and maybe handlebar tape.
 

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Congrats on a nice bike and a GREAT deal!

I agree with Bikeboy and Sscooter. Don't go putting money into it until you KNOW what you want and/or need. The saddle may even be fine for you. Just ride the heck out of it and have fun. Then, as you learn more, consider upgrading as you see fit and have the money.

Todd
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys, really appreciate the recommendations. After buying the bike, my piggy bank is a bit low so i'll take your advise and just ride it.

I really NEED pedals and some bibs. My rear end is killing me today.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Zak said:
I really NEED pedals and some bibs. My rear end is killing me today.
Uh, unless you sit funny, pedals aren't gonna help yer butt... :p

Congrats on the new bike - sounds like a great deal! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
LOL!

heading out to a few LBS during lunch for Pedals/Shoes and some shorts. I need to play around with the seat adjustment as I think it is a bit to far back as the previous owner was about 2" taller than me. The bike might be a little big for me, but I like the fact that it has an adjustible stem so I can raise the handlebars up a little. I have a long torso and shorter legs so the 58cm bike just barely fits me.
 

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It definitely sounds like...

Zak said:
LOL!

heading out to a few LBS during lunch for Pedals/Shoes and some shorts. I need to play around with the seat adjustment as I think it is a bit to far back as the previous owner was about 2" taller than me. The bike might be a little big for me, but I like the fact that it has an adjustible stem so I can raise the handlebars up a little. I have a long torso and shorter legs so the 58cm bike just barely fits me.
...the bike is too big for you, but you can probably make it work. Your saddle problems could be from a lot of different sources. The stock saddle for that bike is Selle San Marco Ischea Chromoly, which I know nothing about. I use Koobi saddles, they've always worked for me. Have the LBS fit you, even if it's only a 5 minute quick fit. The idea is to get the saddle height and fore aft position relative to the pedals right first; then do what you have to with stem length/stack height to get the front end set up right. Lose the shorts, go with bibs...good ones. And get some chamois cream, not for the chamois, for you...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I picked up a pair of bibs yesterday, Performance store brand as they had them on sale. They made a world of difference. Did a 10 mile ride today with a lot of hills and the saddle only felt uncomfortable for hte last half mile or so. I need to adjust the saddle a little forward as well as degrease everytihng as the previous owner had a ton of oil/grease all over everything. the derailers need some tuning too but love this bike and thoroughly addicted to riding now.

Bought some SPD pedals and ordered shoes as Performance was having a nice sale. Shoes should be next week. Looking forward to seeing the difference between riding with platform pedals and shoes/pedals. Thanks for the advise everyone.
 

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IME saddle position is critical for comfort. Keep playing with it, and if you can't get it so it's comfortable for long distances, don't be afraid to see if your LBS can help you dial in the bike fit.
 
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