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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am first a mountain biker CX is new to me and I didn't think I would like it as much as I do.

I know very little of part choices for wheel sets and so I can only go with what I see in pictures.
 

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vegan cyclocross disco
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the zipp carbon cross rims if you want the high dollar hip hop insanity.

but the thought of tubeless cross is gets me fired up. maybe the dura-ace tubeless road wheels?
 

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p != b
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If I was going carbon (wheels), it'd be Reynolds. Even then, I wouldn't bother with carbon wheels for cx unless you're running tubulars (tires that are glued on to the rims), otherwise you're going to be really testing the strength of the rim's sidewall.

Talking high-profile brakes, you've got a few options. If you want v-style brake pads, you've got Kore, Tektro iirc, and Paul. I've only used Paul's , an they're great atmo. If you want old canti/smooth post pads (ie adjust toe-in with a pair of pliers), you've got spooky, TRP EuroX, and others that I'm not aware of.

While I love my Paul's, I'd be looking at the Kore and Tektro high-profile brakes - should work just as well as Paul, but at half the price.
 

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My friend uses the Carbon TRP brakes and says they are super powerful and great.

I vote Reynolds Carbon Cyclocross Tubulars

I used to think the guys in C on carbon bikes and wheels was goofy. But I think the enlightened view would be: what do I care? or even. Go for it dudes!
 

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More cowbell!
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I may catch some flak for my opinion, but here it goes anyways....

If you're only going to have one wheelset, get clinchers. You'll need to change tires to match course conditions and clinchers make this change possible in only a few minutes. They'll also allow you to change a flat when you're 10 miles from home on a training ride. If I were you, I'd look hard at the Williams 30X wheels. They're 1595 grams, have 30mm deep rims, hybrid ceramic bearings, and retail for only $489.

If you're getting a second wheelset, then by all means get tubies. There are lots of good choices on the market. Wrap them in some Challenge Grifo tires which are a good all-around tire, then have your clinchers in the pit.
 

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Bang for Buck

I'm gonna agree w/cyco-phile on this. If you're gonna have 1 wheelset, then I'd go w/non-carbon clinchers. (I like my neuvations , under $400 & under 1600g)
This way you can easily change tires if it's wet/dry/muddy as hell.
Easier to train on. I'd put the extra few buck into a 2-3 sets of tires.
Michelin jet & mud are good place to start (I'm in the NE).
I've done it this way for 2 seasons now. Don't get me wrong, I DO get the jones for some dead sexy deep-V carbon sew ups, but then.....I can't recall a single race where I even remotely thought different wheels would have won me the race.
I'd use the extra money and buy a lighter frame/fork (e.g.: Ridley x-fire)
If you absolutely gotta have em though, I've heard good things about the Reynolds Cross.
Good Luck.
 

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Roadbikereview Editor
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If you're going to have one wheelset to race and train on clinchers make a lot of sense. One company worth checking out: Rol Wheelworks.

They have some very affordable handbuilt alloy clinchers.
And if you have a lust for carbon, they have some very nice models. Their carbon wheelsets use rims made by Edge Composites--top of the line.
 
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