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It's not TOO Cold!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It has been too hot to use the kitchen to brew. I got a patio burner for my B-Day, 55,000 BTU/hr and hanging on the patio all day, great way to recover from lots of riding over the weekend. Also, this batch I did from all grain, about $15 cheaper than using the extract, for 5 gallons of beer. In about 30 days I will have my very own version of Hazed & Infused. I am going to try to make at least 2 more batches in the next 2 weeks, Apparently my free time is going to be drastically reduced :thumbsup:
 

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Non non normal
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So are you saying it is only about 15 bucks for 5 gallons using all grain? How much longer does the process take?
 

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Always changing.....
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PM me your address/ I will be happy to taste test it to ensure it is safe.

I used to love making all-grain. It has been a few years since; the taste, mouth-feel, head are that much better. Wait, what?
 

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I'd like to get into all grain, but probably won't happen until after kids are grown (don't even have 'em yet) and I'm done racing.

Not sure what I started doing right, but I get lots of comments that they were glad to see I went all grain, despite still using etracts. I had a tripel and an old ale that my club wants me to enter into the next state fair.
 

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Slightly Opinionated
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Damn, I'm just getting ready to try a Dark IPA.

Northern Brewer, Cascade, Centennial and Chinook hops, amber LME, a couple pounds of caramel 40 grain and .5lb of roasted barley. A little dry hopping with Cascade leaf hops and this should be pretty good.
 

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It's not TOO Cold!
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
bigrider said:
So are you saying it is only about 15 bucks for 5 gallons using all grain? How much longer does the process take?
I cost about $22, $9 of which was for hops. It took about 4.5 hours from start to yeast pitching. The patio cooker really helped get the temp up in a hurry.
 

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For the Horde!
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I've been brewing for about a year now. Using the extract is a lot easier and quicker that's for sure, but I like doing all the work myself with a full/partial mash.

I just started an Oktoberfest batch a couple weeks ago to celebrate the birth of my 2nd child and of course.. Oktoberfest!
 

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n00bsauce
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Sledgehammer03 said:
It has been too hot to use the kitchen to brew. I got a patio burner for my B-Day, 55,000 BTU/hr and hanging on the patio all day, great way to recover from lots of riding over the weekend. Also, this batch I did from all grain, about $15 cheaper than using the extract, for 5 gallons of beer. In about 30 days I will have my very own version of Hazed & Infused. I am going to try to make at least 2 more batches in the next 2 weeks, Apparently my free time is going to be drastically reduced :thumbsup:
My all grain setup (13.5 gallons in the boil kettle). Just kegged and carbonated a Summit Extra Pale Ale clone. Tastes great even before carbonation.
 

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Seat's not level
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Sledgehammer, you need to bring some by the house so we can see how it tastes in a couple big mugs.

Srsly...



I'll even take the t-shirt out of the mugs and chill them.
 

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It's not TOO Cold!
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We will make that happen. I am going to be going both ways, all the way through your town in the very near future, 5 days a week. I am almost out of home brews, these will be ready in about a month.
 

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It's not TOO Cold!
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Mel Erickson said:
My all grain setup (13.5 gallons in the boil kettle). Just kegged and carbonated a Summit Extra Pale Ale clone. Tastes great even before carbonation.
That is fantastic. Someday I may have a set-up like yours. My next step is soda kegging, bottling is a pain :idea:
 

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Diphthong
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RBR ride at Sledge's house next month!
 

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I want to give this a try one of these days. My dad did it when I was a kid but I've never got around to it. Seems like it would be fun.
 

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Any recommendations for a good home brewer's book, "The Bible," if you will. I've been wanting to home brew for a while-- just pulled the trigger on a basic single-stage brewing kit and Belgian Trippel recipe.

Mel-- that looks sweet, but I wish knew what I was looking at. Care to break it down for me?
 

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Would that be the LD Carlson Ivan Triple? Made that a while back and it was great. Added coriander and bitter orange peel. For my yeast, I added Wyeast Belgian Abbey, which ferments quite nicely in the mid 70's (ambient temp).

If I may be so bold, I think a big asset to a beginning homebrewer is a wort chiller. This cools the wort much quicker than an ice bath, allowing you to get the beer off the hops. No doubt hops are great, but after the boil and during a slow cool, it adds that bitter and undefined characteristic of most beginner homebrews.

A close or distant second would be a secondary fermenter. With the right yeast, fermentation temperature, and time, there shouldn't be much fermentation in the secondary, but it may happen from time to time. The main purpose of the secondary fermenter is to allow for more particulate matter to settle out. There can be some flavor impact, I suppose, but the beer is much more clear.
 

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spade2you said:
Would that be the LD Carlson Ivan Triple? Made that a while back and it was great. Added coriander and bitter orange peel. For my yeast, I added Wyeast Belgian Abbey, which ferments quite nicely in the mid 70's (ambient temp).

If I may be so bold, I think a big asset to a beginning homebrewer is a wort chiller. This cools the wort much quicker than an ice bath, allowing you to get the beer off the hops. No doubt hops are great, but after the boil and during a slow cool, it adds that bitter and undefined characteristic of most beginner homebrews.

A close or distant second would be a secondary fermenter. With the right yeast, fermentation temperature, and time, there shouldn't be much fermentation in the secondary, but it may happen from time to time. The main purpose of the secondary fermenter is to allow for more particulate matter to settle out. There can be some flavor impact, I suppose, but the beer is much more clear.
This is the recipe. My buddy who brews suggested the same yeast you used.

You may be so bold-- I appreciate the help.:thumbsup: Are wort coolers or secondary fermenters something I should consider for my first batch? I can upgrade to a two stage (secondary fermenter?) for about $45. A wort chiller is about the same price-- do I need a two stage set up to take advantage of the chiller?

Thanks.
 

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Always changing.....
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Mel Erickson said:
My all grain setup (13.5 gallons in the boil kettle). Just kegged and carbonated a Summit Extra Pale Ale clone. Tastes great even before carbonation.

Really nice set-up. I always hated brewing in the summer. It was the heat for one thing, but then I needed vast amounts of ice to cool the wort down based on my set-up. Easier in the winter with snow. :D
 

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Anyone can make a wort chiller for less than $30 or so. Go to the hardware store, get some copper refrigeration line in 3/8" diameter, get a faucet hookup with 3/8" barb, adapter(if needed), a couple of hose clamps, and buy your food safe hose from your local homebrew supply place. Coil the copper neatly into your kettle, hook the hose up to both ends, rest one in the sink, hook the other to the faucet, and be done with it.

Drops 2.5-3 gallons of boiling wort to under 80 degrees in under 5-6 minutes with an outlet temp of ~45 degrees using 3/8" copper. Make sure you stir the wort to cool it all.

A two stage fermentation system is mostly for clarity and sediment removal. I've used two stages since I started brewing and still have a decent amount of yeast in each bottle, but I can't imagine not doing it.

The wort chiller will help speed the process of cooling up considerably, but has nothing to do with fermentation
 
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