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I don't remember if that year had a round top tube or not so the PS solution 'may' not work. That said, if original rivet holes weren't damaged when the stop let go, the replacement rivet-on stop is the best solution. I've had to re-rivet stops a handful of times for people. Scuff up the mating surface and put a good cross hatch type scratch into it (obviously not for carbon frames), then apply some epoxy and rivet the stop in place. The epoxy helps to ensure a solid joint between the two surfaces and the rivets will provide the shear strength. It helps to preload the cable a touch during the process to make sure the assembly sets up in a loaded position with no chance of play the first time you grab the brake. Test with a HARD brake lever pull after 24hrs, if it stays put then just keep an eye on it and inspect from time to time.
PS, remove/treat the corrosion before all this and apply some touch up paint after to keep it sealed up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ive actually just fitted a length of outer from the lever to the brake and it seems to work smooth enough. then ive just cable tied it to the top tube.
I looked into the PS clamps but the top tube is too large and is also an oval shape so that wouldnt work
I actually pulled with a pair of pliers on the front stop and it completely sheared off with relatively light force. I'm guessing either fatigue or corrosion has done it to both stops. That or maybe specialized just didn't attach them very well.
They aren't actually riveted on, bonded I think.
I expect i will replace the frame soon so shouldn't be too much of an issue as it is, at least i can now use it again
 

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Just realized that the link provided says chainstay stop, so it's likely sized for gear cable, but the same idea applies if you source the right part. Either way, it's repairable by drilling the frame for rivets if you actually wanted to save it.
 

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I'm gonna guess the 2008 Allez is aluminum, at least from my casual research.

The cable stop/rivet/tube likely had a mismatch in material, causing galvanic corrosion, leading to the failure. As others have said, you can rivet on a new cable guide or have a framebuilder who works in aluminum do the work. Some bike shops are equipped as well.

Whether you want to condemn the frame is up to you. It could be a convenient excuse to get a new frame or at least a heads up to start saving for the day the Allez really fails.
 
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