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hit it
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Background:

I'm a road bike n00b and ride for exercise. I've been riding about a month now. The bike is a 2001 Cannondale CAAD4 - R600 that I picked up used for fairly cheap. I took it in for a tune up & it rides well. I'm 6'2" & 215 lbs.

Yesterday I was on my ride, which is generally about an 18 - 20 mile loop that takes about 1:15 or so. I was clipping along really well. The bike computer says averaging about 18 mph for the ride which is fast for me.

About 5 miles into the ride, I heard a "plink" sound and thought to myself, "Wow. I bet that is what it sounds like when you break a spoke". I looked down at my rear wheel and sure enough, that is what it sounds like when you break a spoke.

I stopped & checked it out, the spoke was internal & held in place by the other spokes. It wasn' t going anywhere so I rode the bike home slowly.

My questions:

1 - Was riding home with a broken spoke the correct thing to do?

2 - Will my LBS be able to fix this in a day & how much $$ am I looking at?

3 - How common is this? I've only put about 200 miles on the bike but it likely has around 2K miles on it.

4 - Should I think about getting a heavier duty wheelset? I only ride for fitness & am concerned more with durability than speed / sexiness.
 

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My questions:

1 - Was riding home with a broken spoke the correct thing to do?

2 - Will my LBS be able to fix this in a day & how much $$ am I looking at?

3 - How common is this? I've only put about 200 miles on the bike but it likely has around 2K miles on it.

4 - Should I think about getting a heavier duty wheelset? I only ride for fitness & am concerned more with durability than speed / sexiness.
1. yes. no harm done
2. yes. not much $. you could learn to do it yourself, too. many of us do it.
3. quite common. If your LBS has a good wheel builder, you might ask him to check the tension and touch the wheel up if necessary
4 probably not. If it starts to break a lot of spokes, that might suggest a damaged rim or badly-built wheel, but one could just be a fluke.

Get it fixed and ride on.
 

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hit it
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
JCavilia said:
1. yes. no harm done
2. yes. not much $. you could learn to do it yourself, too. many of us do it.
3. quite common. If your LBS has a good wheel builder, you might ask him to check the tension and touch the wheel up if necessary
4 probably not. If it starts to break a lot of spokes, that might suggest a damaged rim or badly-built wheel, but one could just be a fluke.

Get it fixed and ride on.

Excellent reply & good news all around.

I wrench on my motorcycles... just need to figure out the bicycle stuff. For now... I'll just bring the wheel to my LBS & have them fix it & maybe give me a couple of extra spokes to take with me, just in case.
 

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ive broken numerous spokes on my mtb and learned to replace them myself, it does save money because you dont have to pay labor at an lbs. but as jcavilia said it doesnt really cause any damage, just be weary if more break.
 

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Shirtcocker
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NUTT said:
FYI,

The fix was $12 including a new spoke & labor.
what kinda wheelset are you riding? You're near my weight and I don't right lightweight wheels.
 
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