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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have tried to search the Internet for a coherent source on building a road bike but have been unable to find any. I want to build a setup similar to a Cannondale R2000. Can anyone give me any advice or turn me to some good sources (books, www)? I am particularly interested in exactly what I need besides the obvious major components and tools. I am afraid that minor oversights could windup costing me some major heartache. Any advice is warmly welcomed!

Thanks in advance,
Michael
 

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There really isn't anything to overlook. You need the obvious components. The easiest way to get all of that info is to look at online retailer's build kits. But here goes a quick rundown:
Shifters/Brake levers
Cables- shifter and brake
bars
bar tape
stem
headset
fork front and rear brakes
frame
crankset
bottom bracket
front and rear deraileur
chain
cassette
wheels
tires
tubes
rim strips
skewers
seat post clamp
seat post
saddle
That'll get you rolling. Everything else is just fluff.
Have fun.
 

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it's like a puzzle

downshift is right, you collect all the parts, ensure they're compatible ie. all shimano or campagnolo in the shifter/derailleur department. then simply put the pieces together. when building a cannondale however watch for campagnolo compatible integrated headsets with 45 x 45 degree bearings. the more common 36 x 45 degree bearings won't fit right and can damage your frame. when building my own cannondale R5000 I used an FSA orbit CF integrated headset for example. i had a shop sell me a 36 x 45 headset and was wise enough to double check before going any further and had it replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Would you recommend buying a "full group" from a good shop/eShop or buying the pieces individually? Do you normally buy the frame first and then go from there? What order would you buy the parts in?

Thanks,
Michael
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the help and the list. Do you think there is a good order to buying parts to ensure compatability?

Thanks,
Michael
 

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mstuart007 said:
I have tried to search the Internet for a coherent source on building a road bike but have been unable to find any. I want to build a setup similar to a Cannondale R2000. Can anyone give me any advice or turn me to some good sources (books, www)? I am particularly interested in exactly what I need besides the obvious major components and tools. I am afraid that minor oversights could windup costing me some major heartache. Any advice is warmly welcomed!

Thanks in advance,
Michael
Buy Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance and a six pack, and read it, cover to cover. Then reskim it the next morning after you've ridden 40 to cure your hangover ;)

Seriously, if you've not built a bike before, it's very doable, but make sure you're familiar with how everything bolts together. Mr. Zinn even suggests the toolsets you need for light repairs all the way to tools you need to open a shop. The Park Tool book is also an Excellent resource.

One other thing is find a good shop, either internet or local. Some things are not worth buying the tools to do yourself, such as pressing in a headset, installing the star fangled nut, facing a bottom bracket, or building a wheelset. Other than that, everything pretty much bolts on. I would buy the frame with the headset and fork already installed and the BB faced. You can have them leave the fork long with several spacers and cut it down yourself later, if need be. Several of the better mail order outfits (GVH, R&A, Excel, Wrench Science) will do that for you, or take it to your LBS.

Before you take the plunge, you might also want to look at some of the outfits above for a complete bike, if you just can't get what you want at your LBS. I was looking for a lugged steel classic earlier this year, and thinking about building it up myself, but ended up getting the complete from Tom at GVH. Tom did me right!!. You pick all of the components out, so you get exactly the bike you want, and his assembly charge was minimal.
 

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frame first, correct size

Be sure you get the right size frame to start. Competitive Cyclist has a pretty comprehensive do-it-yourself test, that generates lots of useful info for not only frame size, but also stem size, seatpost, etc.:

http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CCY?PAGE=FIT_CALCULATOR_INTRO

And check the websites of the builders on the frames you're considering for the TOP TUBE size. Different "frame" sizes (based on the seat tube length--which is not as critical as top tube lenght, and is measured inconsistently at that) equate with a given ideal top tube size. For example, I need a 59.5-60 cm top tube. There were "frame sizes" from 59-63cm that rendered this top tube lenght. Good luck.
 
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