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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
It's done!!! After a few weeks of waiting for parts to come in, checking to see what I have, running through lists to make sure I don't need anything else, it's finally finished! I now have a bike that I don't mind getting wet (like for Saturday's ride).

You may ask why a rain bike? Well, my main ride is a Colnago MasterXLight. I'm paranoid about rust.

It's a PedalForce RS frame with PF fork. Headset is FSA. Components are 8sp Campy Mirage (13/26 cassette, 39/53 up front), except for a Centaur BB, and Chorus brakes. Wheels are Open Pro's built on Chorus hubs. Seat needs to go when I have some more money. Stem is 75mm Specialized. Bars are Salsa Poco short reach. Seatpost is generic. Oh, and I put a clip on type rear fender (just call me Fred) after I took the picture.

Most of those parts I scavenged off another bike that I had here, or were leftovers from other projects. Bars, stem, BB, and Headset are new, along with cables, housing and chain. I probably should remove one link from the chain. This was my first go at getting the length right, last time I had the shop do that.

Planned upgrades are:
Seatpost and saddle (sooner rather than later)
Chorus 11 (much later)

Total out of pocket: about $650.

Anyway, here it is:
 

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If it doesn't have fenders, is it really a rain bike?

Way more nice parts than I'd put on a rain bike (mine is an old Trek, probably worth about 60 bucks), but that's a matter of taste and budget.
If you're really going to ride in the rain, though, fenders are a huge plus. I resisted for awhile until I tried a friend's bike, then the light dawned....

EDIT: So Moabbiker types faster than I do. So what?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a clip on rear fender to keep my back drier. I haven't figured out the front yet.
 

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Roadie with unshaven legs
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I would try a set of SKS RaceBlades. They aren't cheap but they work pretty well. They don't protect as well as full fenders but you would have a difficult time installing full fenders on that bike. I don't ride my RS in the rain. I would rather ride my commuter bike (cheap, cheap, cheap) with full fenders on it or my FS mountain bike with fenders in the rain.
 

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JoelS said:
I have a clip on rear fender to keep my back drier. I haven't figured out the front yet.
you're not doing it right.
 

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Off the back
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He may not have sufficient clearance to put full fenders on there. Mostly between the brakes. I used Zefal fenders bought from Nashbar (less than $20) and it took quite a bit of tweaking to get them to work properly. Used zip ties to secure the brackets to where one normally attaches to eyelets.

The downside of full fenders is that everybody wants to draft you.
 

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fenders are required

People are right, It's not a rain bike without finders. Looking at that bike I would say that real fenders would be some work to install as that looks like carbon, at least the front fork. Nobody was expecting you to put fenders on it so they didn't add any clearance even though if they provided as little as 3/8ths of an itch it probably would have worked. This is what I did.
On the front, cut the fender off so it doesn't extend through the fork. it will never fit anyway as there is no clearance. Then get a Sheldon nut and mount the fender bracket on the back of the front brake bolt.
The rear is a little tougher. I ground off the rear bracket and pretty much flipped it around and bolted it back on the fender . I used machine bolts and a nut on the outside of the fender and ground the heads off to minimum height to clear the tire. Then I ground the edges off the fender where it went through the fork to sit up high in the fork of the seat stay and clear the tire. I was just barely able to clear the fender. I knotched the bracket hole to make it easier mounting. For the front of the fender down along the lower seat tube, I tye wrapped it to the frame. This whole process wasn't particulary hard but it was a little time consuming and tedious. clearances are minimal. It wasn't easy and it took me a couple rides to get the rattling down to a minimum, with fenders, you never get the rattles to go away completely, but it works great now and seeing as the rear fender is sort of slid back, it's really good about not spraying water on a following rider as it's really low in back. This is something the clip on fenders just don't do. I had no bracket mounts for either the front or rear so i wrapped the frame with a little rubber and then tye wrapped the cable ends on
Do this or something like it and you can really call it a rain bike. I have some pictures somewhere. If I knew right now I would post tihem. If interested let me know.
NOTE: if you are not really mechanically inclined, this is not something you want to pursue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Raceblades would probably work fine for fenders. To start with, I have a clip on MTB fender. I'll see about something else when next winter rolls around. It doesn't rain much, if at all, here during the summer.
 

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so what part of the country you in?

JoelS said:
Raceblades would probably work fine for fenders. To start with, I have a clip on MTB fender. I'll see about something else when next winter rolls around. It doesn't rain much, if at all, here during the summer.
so what part of the country you in?
 

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Roadie with unshaven legs
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California weather is really just two seasons for most of the state: spring and summer. I live near San Francisco and we typically get rain storms blowing through here from about Thanksgiving through to about the middle of April. Then it's dry until the cycle starts again in October. I think that there have been only a handful of storms hitting us during the dry months since I can recall (lived here almost all of my 43 years).

As for a rain bike, my vision would be an aluminum cyclocross frame and fork, either disc brakes or V-brakes with ceramic rims, full fenders, inexpensive drivetrain, synthetic bar wrap, synthetic saddle cover, head and tail lights, etc. The frame should have slightly more relaxed geometry for some stability while riding in the rain.
 

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Yellow raincoat, yellow rain-hat, and flippers. All set. No fenders required.
 
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