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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Happened to be walking my little guy past a building that had a fire on the top floor a few weeks ago when I noticed a bike sticking out of a dumpster outside. Now, this being Brooklyn, there's a lot of junk lying around the street, so you don't just bring home any old thing you find, and since I didn't get a great look at it I walked passed and dropped my guy at school. I had a hunch that the bike might be worth salvaging though - and I was just then trying to rustle up a road bike for my wife - so I was thinking maybe it could be made into a beater for her. Anyway, I went back and it was still there. I pulled it out of the dumpster, and it seemed pretty solid - definitely a decent bike at one point, but who knows now? The more I looked, the more I liked, so since I was just a block away from home anyway, I walked it down the sidewalk with me. Hmmm... wheels turn no problem, and they're tubulars! (definitely a good sign as far as garbage bikes go!) Ah, and she's a fixie! (And a former gearie as well...)

I couldn't wait to check it out more, but I had to go to work. When I got home, I brought it up from the basement after dinner and looked it over. Steel lugged frame, bianchi, cinelli bars, things are looking good! The frame was completely covered in red cotton bar tape, but once I got it all off there wasn't even a bad scratch on it. Headset functioned perfectly, the BB seems quite solid and even the crank could be made serviceable with some SS bolts and new chain rings. And best of all, it's too big for my wife but perfect for me!

Any suggestions for how to refurbish this little cutie that has now been saved twice from bicycle oblivion? I think I'll have to heave the wheels. It's got Gipiemme hubs - which aren't high quality from what I can tell just quickly - and Montreal tubular rims, they seem to be actually fine - not far out of true even - but I have no idea how to mount those tires. I figure if I go for a flip-flop hub, I might keep the regular bars and run front and rear brakes, but if I get a one-sided wheel, I'll just do the one brake on the front. Trying to keep this as cheap as possible.
 

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Master Bike Mechanic
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409 Posts
One thing I should point out, save the seat post. If it is anything like my Bianchi which has identical lugs (It was sadly damaged in a crash, I still keep the frame around in hopes of getting it repaired.) it won't have a 27.2 Post. The original post is probaly like 26-26.5.

As for the wheels, some body may well be willing to pay for those on Ebay, just make sure to use the usualy assortment of Track, Pista, Fixed gear and vintage in the title. (Please excuse me if you're a seasond Ebayer, but I figured the advise would help if you aren't.). This way you may be able to cut your cost's significantly, maybe even enough for a bead blast and a rattle can finish.

Or you do a search on tubular wheels and learn how to do them yourself. Finally you can take them to your LBS and have them put the tires on there for around $20 each plus the tires cost.
 

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Strip all the parts off including the fork and headset.

Use aircraft grade paint stripper to strip the frame and fork.
Use a propane torch and heat up the rear brack cable guides, shifter bosses, etc until cherry red and pull them off with a pair of pliers.
Clean frame and do a final wipe with acetone.
Pick up some tape and good paint in a spray can
Paint
Follow paint with several cans of clear coat after hand painting lug cutouts
WAIT TWO WEEKS
Build up bike
 
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