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Hello All and Thanks…Here’s my Q.
I have a trek 5500 comes with Bontrager race x lite wheels. It’s a 2003, I bought it used but I do love this bike. I feel like I accelerate up hills with this bike and it fits very well. So this love affair has gone on for just over a year now. I have done a few tris and over a thousand miles with it. I do not know its history prior to my purchase.
So I am riding last week on an easy uphill grade and I hear a spoke pop. It broke about an inch above the hub side bend. I have no idea of why. I was in a very smooth section of road.
So here’s where I need your help. June 3 I am in a tri that is my goal event for the year. Do I trust the setup ( yes I replaced the spoke) or should I have the wheel rebuilt? Buy a new wheel? I really do not want to have this happen during the race.
If you know of a good rear wheel, have an opinion or experience on what I should do I greatly appreciate it.

Thanks,
Will
 

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50ft. Queenie
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no, you dont need to buy a new wheel. if you did the replace yourself and are uncomfortable with it, have your shop check it out... it aint no big thing.. dont worry about it.. just have the shop check your work for your own peace of mind :) might cost ya $10
 

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Here's my shade-tree wheel-truing advice. If it's straight/round and you can plink the spokes on the side where the spoke failed and they all sound roughly the same pitch then you have effected a good repair. If there's a massive difference in pitch between the one replaced and the ones around it then you might be looking for problems down the road but it's unlikely (insert: please sign your legal waiver here) to fail catastrophically unless you're a real masher/clydesdale.

Again - if you don't feel comfortable w/it - take it to a good LBS and have them true it up.

PS - I rode a back wheel for 40 out of a 60 mile 22mph avg. hilly club ride over the weekend after a non drive-side spoke gave out. Mechanically I was embarrassed but it didn't slow me down.
 

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I can't tell the pitch difference too well.. so I prefer the Park Tool Tension meter..



Srexy said:
Here's my shade-tree wheel-truing advice. If it's straight/round and you can plink the spokes on the side where the spoke failed and they all sound roughly the same pitch then you have effected a good repair. If there's a massive difference in pitch between the one replaced and the ones around it then you might be looking for problems down the road but it's unlikely (insert: please sign your legal waiver here) to fail catastrophically unless you're a real masher/clydesdale.

Again - if you don't feel comfortable w/it - take it to a good LBS and have them true it up.

PS - I rode a back wheel for 40 out of a 60 mile 22mph avg. hilly club ride over the weekend after a non drive-side spoke gave out. Mechanically I was embarrassed but it didn't slow me down.
 

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I am a little suspicious that it broke an inch above the hub flange. There's a possibility that the chain could have been shifted onto the drive side spokes at somepoint in the wheels history, damaging several of the spokes on that side. I would suggest that you have the wheel closely examined and have the drive side spokes replaced if that were the case.
 
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