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On the flat, the normal cadence would be anything between 85 to 105 (+/-) rpm.

What’s your cadence when peddle out of saddle on the flat (say a reasonable sustainable distance)
 

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What’s your cadence when peddle out of saddle on the flat (say a reasonable sustainable distance)
I don't peddle stuff while I'm on a bike. Come to think of it, I don't know many peddlers on bikes. I have seen guys peddle stuff on street corners, though, usually having a nice selection of original Rolex watches hanging off the inside of their coats. Awesome deals on those watches, I tell you.
 

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I'll actually answer your question unlike the others two guys. Usually on the flats I average from 90-100 and when climbing out of the saddle I am in the 80s. When it gets really steep though usually I am in the 70s, but from what I have experienced I spin a lot more than the average person. Just seems easier to me, I hate riding anything lower than 70 rpm.
 

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If I am out of the saddle, I am usually either:
1. Trying to power over a short hill, in which case my cadence is usually 70-80,
2. Trying not to have to stop and walk on a really steep, long hill, in which case it can be 40-60 depending on how really steep, or
3. Stretching, in which case it is 0.
 

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On the flat, the normal cadence would be anything between 85 to 105 (+/-) rpm.

What’s your cadence when peddle out of saddle on the flat (say a reasonable sustainable distance)
Aside from the "I'm not a peddler but I do pedal a bicycle" comments, I can never understand the issue here. Yes it makes sense to get up off the saddle every once in a while and lighter folks can often do well out of the saddle while climbing but what the heck does being out of the saddle for "a reasonable sustainable distance" mean? There's one guy who posts here who apparently rides standing up all the time but it makes no sense as a riding style. It's inefficient and not something to aspire to. Some people shift up a gear before standing for 10 seconds (on the flats) but otherwise I cannot imagine the reason for keeping track of your cadence when standing. But that's just me.
 

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I don't stay out of the saddle for more than a tenth of a mile ever really, but to your cadence question for me it's between 60 and 70 normally. I do it to give my seat some relief and to power up harder hills when my legs need a bit of relief.
 

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On the flats I only get out of the saddle for a break or to sprint. The breaks are probably in the 50 or 60s and really brief, and the sprints are in the 90s+.
I climb alot out of the saddle and am comfortable in the mid70s-low 90s, I don't like getting down into the 60s.
 

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If you want to be efficient, you stay seated except for occasionally changing your position by standing or climbing. I am much better in relation to others by standing and powering up hills and I do that with maybe a 50 - 60 rather than my regular 85-90 cadence. But as soon as I top the climb, I'm back to sitting
 

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After some 40 years of cycling I find that I agree completely with Mike. Every great once in awhile you'll try to race someone up the last 100 yards to the top of a rise and might get it up to 100. Any faster than that and you have more power in the saddle.
 

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A friend of mine raced in his long gone youth and still stands on EVERY climb. He finds it much more comfortable. Though I cannot see how. But he is light and of medium height. And never let's the bedbugs bite.
Differrent strokes. Go dig up some video of the 1998 Tour de France, especially a couple of climbing stages after Pantani took the lead, and Ullrich attacked on subsequent days, but could not get away. There are long climbing stretches where Ullrich is pushing a pretty big gear seated, grinding away, and Pantani beside him is out of the saddle dancing at a higher cadence. They're both doing what worked for their body types.

As for the OP's question, my personal answer is "slower than when seated, but it varies." And I don't pay much attention to the numbers. Sometimes I ride a fixed gear on moderately hilly rides, so I'm grinding up a hill at 35-40 rpm, and then spinning down at 135. Whatever works.
 

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Differrent strokes. Go dig up some video of the 1998 Tour de France, especially a couple of climbing stages after Pantani took the lead, and Ullrich attacked on subsequent days, but could not get away. There are long climbing stretches where Ullrich is pushing a pretty big gear seated, grinding away, and Pantani beside him is out of the saddle dancing at a higher cadence. They're both doing what worked for their body types.

As for the OP's question, my personal answer is "slower than when seated, but it varies." And I don't pay much attention to the numbers. Sometimes I ride a fixed gear on moderately hilly rides, so I'm grinding up a hill at 35-40 rpm, and then spinning down at 135. Whatever works.
so true. although it does seem like the jockeys--tiny guys like contador--can dance on the pedals much more effectively than the tall riders like wiggo and froome. (although watching froome climb out of the saddle is its own reward: "how does he make that style work for him?" :p)
 
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