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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there: I am in the market of a new custom build road bike (frame: Argon 18 Radon, and wheels either Fulcrum 5 or Easton EA50). My Focus bike has SRAM Rival and I love it. However, lets try something different I cannot consolidate on either Sram Rival or Campagnolo Veloce with skeleton brakes for my new bike.

The braking power of Sram Rival is incredible and it saved my life one day when I nearly smashed into the boot of a car. My rear brake completely bloked the rear wheels and I came to an immediate stop.

The Campa skeleton rear brake is just only single-pivot. This sounds all good on paper and in theory.

Has anyone first hand experience of using SRAM road brakes versus Campa brakes (with single pivot on the rear)?
 

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I'm glad you survived your near miss, but locking up the rear wheel had very little to do with your stopping in time. The front brake does nearly all the work in a hard stop (in fact, a really skilled rider can stop faster with the front brake alone). It's easy to "lock up" the rear wheel -- i.e., make it skid -- because when you're braking hard with the front the rear wheel gets unweighted.

Bottom line: single-pivot brakes are plenty adequate for the rear brake. Truth is, we rode for decades with single-pivot centerpulls, and stopped just fine. Dual-pivots just reduce the hand force required, and therefore allow (in theory) a little better modulation at high braking forces.

I have no first-hand experience with the specific comparison you describe, but I know how brakes work.
 

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exactly what JCavilia said...if you locked the rear, you were getting zero braking as the tire was sliding on the pavement, not slowing you down (other than a very small amount from friction). the harder you are braking, the more the front brake provides the majority of your stopping power. look at motorcycle brakes, 2 huge front rotors, 1 small rear rotor. i like campy's idea of a single pivot rear caliper, it works great.
 

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I have SRAM Red on one bike, Campy Record 11 (w/single pivot rear brake) on the other. They both brake exceptionally well. I'd give the edge to the Record 11 in terms of feel/power but that's just my personal feeling on the matter, I don't have any scientific data to back it up.

Just remember 80% of your stopping power or something like that comes from the front brake. You'll get the most from either brake system by having them dialed in correctly to suit your preferences and get the most out of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Kristatos said:
I have SRAM Red on one bike, Campy Record 11 (w/single pivot rear brake) on the other. They both brake exceptionally well. I'd give the edge to the Record 11 in terms of feel/power but that's just my personal feeling on the matter, I don't have any scientific data to back it up.

Just remember 80% of your stopping power or something like that comes from the front brake. You'll get the most from either brake system by having them dialed in correctly to suit your preferences and get the most out of them.
Hi

I have another question (I know a lot ist related to rim material and brake pad composition but any way): breaking from from the hood position (going downhill after a climb) was just great with my Rival. I wonder if breaking from the hoods is as powerfull with Campa ergopowers. By comparison when braking from the hoods with my Shimano 105 STI it takes a lot of effort and muscles as big a those from Schwarzenegger. I have an old (16 years) steel road bike fitted with Campa Veloce brakes and stopping power if braking from the hoods is more or less zero.

I understand Campa has changed the shape of the levers.

Apart from the 200 gramms weight penalty for Veloce as compared to Rival. I cannot decide which one will go onto my next road bike. By the way: I have been using the Rival 2008 group for about 15 000 km and have had absolutely no problems in terms of durability. The Campa Mirage levers on my other steel bike are worn out after only 13 000 km or so; also the front derailleur didn't last that long and dveloped a lot of play after 13 000 km.
 
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