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Does anyone where a Camelback when they ride or just use bottles? Because I'm going on my first 40mi+ ride and I would like to stay hydrated (also I'm riding a Mt. Bike with Downhill tires, Downhill tubes and sealant.so, the slowest rolling thing imaginable).

Thanks,
James
 

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sometimereader
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MK1 said:
Haha, it does look good but is it enough for a ride like this?
I only use a hydration pack when I expect to have more than about 90 minutes without refill oppurtunities. (I would rather not have the weight on my back, butt, and legs.)

Your route doesn't have that problem, so it's easily doable with 2 (or even 1) water bottles.
 

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MK1 said:
Does anyone where a Camelback when they ride or just use bottles? Because I'm going on my first 40mi+ ride and I would like to stay hydrated (also I'm riding a Mt. Bike with Downhill tires, Downhill tubes and sealant.so, the slowest rolling thing imaginable).
I'd think for most rides, 2 large water bottles can handle it. And if not, there's usually places to refill. Camelbaks? Can't really see myself wearing something like that, unless I was riding through the desert or someplace equally hot and deserted.






At some point, doesn't it just get a tad silly? :frown2:
 

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Where can I get one of those? I wear a neoprene kayaking suit while
riding and recycle my own bodily fluids through a filtration system, so there is no
net fluid loss.
 

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I'd bring water for a 40 mile ride. If you don't have bottle cages, then a camelback would have to do. Food is also a good thing to have.

BTW there is porta-potties and water at Calero, if you go south from Bailey to the horse-riding area entry.
 

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It depends. For forty mile rides I had read that all you really need is water. However, since I have started putting Hammer Gel and/or Perpetuem in my water bottle I am able to ride harder and feel much better afterward. You cannot do this with a Camelbak.

If you stop to take in nutrition, then a Camelbak works well for road riding. It is much more convenient than a water bottle so you drink more regularly and smaller amounts, which is better. Since you cannot see the amount that you are drinking, initially you will drink at twice the rate you normally do until you learn to self-regulate while drinking from the Camelbak. Camelbak now has an Elixir product that you can put in your Camelbak for electrolyte replacement.

I would recommend 2 water bottles for a 40-mile ride with Hammer Gel. If I go on longer rides that are unsupported I bring 2 water bottles and my Camelbak.

For road riding, I went with the Slipstream that is specifically designated for cycling. It holds 48 ounces which is the same as 2-24 ounce bottles. This size Camelbak enables you to access your jersey pockets and also can be used to store personal items like keys, money, gel packs, bars and other food, etc.
 

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dekindy said:
It depends. For forty mile rides I had read that all you really need is water. However, since I have started putting Hammer Gel and/or Perpetuem in my water bottle I am able to ride harder and feel much better afterward. You cannot do this with a Camelbak.
You can, but cleaning afterwards becomes much more important!

Like others said, two large bottles should work for 40 miles, but if you still want more, then go for the camelback. Other than it making your back sweaty, there's nothing wrong with it.
 

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When I ride the roadie, I use two water bottles (which happen to be made by Camelback). When I ride my MTB, I use the Camelback backpack. Mostly because I don't have cages on the MTB - I kept losing the bottles on the singletrack.
 

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A stillsuit!

phoehn9111 said:
Where can I get one of those? I wear a neoprene kayaking suit while
riding and recycle my own bodily fluids through a filtration system, so there is no
net fluid loss.
Frank Herbert invented that.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stillsuit
 

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Your route is in the South Bay...

Plenty of convenience stores. Take your two bottles and $5. If you run out of liquid, stop and buy some water or sports drink. The couple of bucks you spend will be worth not having the camelback hang'n on you. Depends on effort and temps, but as others have said, if your route is much more than 90 min (this time of year) with no water stop opportunity then use the CB. (In temps less than say 85F, you might be able to go 3 hrs on two 24oz bottles of sport drink, depending on your effort).

If you don't have the cash on board or you're feeling a little cheap, you can just ask for a little free ice from their soda dispenser, and they'll usually let you. (Been there, done that). As long as you have a little liquid in the bottle, it'll melt down quickly.

Cycling is real simple. Don't make it too tough.
 

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Gotta have the bottles on a skinny bike though. I think it's a law or something. ;)
Yeah, well, when you live someplace where the summer temperatures are the same as the surface of the sun; you can keep your friggen water bottles. When it's 108-110, I'll take my 100oz camelback packed with ice any day.
 

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If you think you'll use it, then just get one. Who cares what anyone else thinks about it? Nothing sucks worse than running out of water halfway through your ride on a hot day.... except maybe getting run over. I know I'd get one if I had an especially long ride planned. I might not use it all the time, but I can see how it would be useful to have on occasion.
 

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croscoe said:
In the dead of summer, temps in SC reach the 120s regularly. Not to mention 500% humidity. :)
Mmm... doubt it. My brother went to grad school in SC, said temps averaged in the 90s in the summer (and yes, he was inland), and that the record temps were prolly around 105-110.

Only Death Valley (and maybe Phoenix) will see a significant number of days in the 120s. I don't doubt you on the humidity, though. Maybe it feels like the 120s?
 
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