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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Colnago Mexico frame with horizontal dropouts, moreover the adjusting screw are missing. That being said, I need a wheel that clamps well onto the dropouts. I seems that having steel cones and quick release would be best for this. I would like to buy a Campagnolo wheelset, but can't really find any information about the materials used for those parts that come into contact with the dropouts. I am not interested in the axle or the material of the quick release lever. I am talking about the serrated parts that clamp the wheel.

Can anybody give me info on the materials used on campy wheelset, especially the Khamsin and the Zonda wheels. I imagine Khamsin being the cheaper it has steel parts there, but what about the Zondas? Is anyone using these wheelsets on a steel frame with horizontal dropouts? Do they clamp well, or is there slippage?
 

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It isn't your wheels you need to worry about, it's your skewers. With the right skewers, any wheel will work. I have a Merckx with horizontal drop outs and have had good luck with Salsa skewers. Old Shimano or Campy ones work well too. I used skewers from an old 8-speed Dura Ace group on my wife's bike with horizontal drop outs and they've worked well. You really have to crank them on tight.
 

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+1 on skewers. my BHS hubs with newer skewers would slip on my bianchi's horiz dropouts. I ended up using the old campy steel skewers that were original on the bike and made them very tight and the wheel stays put, (most of the time).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks a lot for the replies charlox5 and pmf.

So if the skewers are the real issue, will the Campy skewers the wheels would come with do the job? Or should I hunt down some Shimano or older Campy skewers?
 

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I've never owned a set of Campy wheels, soIi don't know anything about their skewers. With vertical drop outs being so prevalent for so many years, skewers don't have to be as tough/tight as they used to be. More emphasis is on light weight these days. I'd get whatever wheels you want to get and see how the skewers they come with work out. Crank the rear one down hard and ride it. See if the wheels comes lose. If it does, then you need to find an alternative. Old Campy and Shimano skewers aren't as common as one would think. You can find the Salsa ones anywhere in several colors.

BTW -- I don't think missing the set screw is a big deal. I bet your LBS can get you a replacement if you want one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BTW -- I don't think missing the set screw is a big deal. I bet your LBS can get you a replacement if you want one.
The issue is that the thread where the set screw goes has been damaged by the previous owner. I bought a pair of adjustment screw some time ago and they wouldn't work. That's why I need the wheel to by tightly held in place.
 

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The issue is that the thread where the set screw goes has been damaged by the previous owner. I bought a pair of adjustment screw some time ago and they wouldn't work. That's why I need the wheel to by tightly held in place.
it's a pretty small hole, and probably a very small thread pitch, but i'm sure you could tap out the hole to clean up the threads. Or, re-drill a slightly bigger hole, tap, and use the appropriate screw.
 

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it's a pretty small hole, and probably a very small thread pitch, but i'm sure you could tap out the hole to clean up the threads. Or, re-drill a slightly bigger hole, tap, and use the appropriate screw.
This would work just fine but it doesn't do anything to hold the wheel in place.

For a good skewer you want a steel skewer rod and an internal cam clamp. That typically means Campy or Shimano standard skewers. If your dropouts are heavily chromed then you want steel hub lock nuts and skewer ends but that is not likely the case. The internal cam design weighs a bit more but can supply a lot more clamping force.
 
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