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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wrestling with the Chorus 11 brifter hoods.
Getting access to the securing band bolt is tough.

Campy 8 hoods are much easier (from the front and from the back),
but that's also because they're old (and the front of the hoods are easy to pull away).

I'd prefer to come from the front, but the flexible hoods seem to be bonded to the hard plastic front piece.

A 2007 thread recommended coming in from the front, but I suspect that back then the Campy 9 or 10 hoods were not fixed to a hard plastic front piece.

Any suggestions?
 

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I'm wrestling with the Chorus 11 brifter hoods.
Getting access to the securing band bolt is tough.

Campy 8 hoods are much easier (from the front and from the back),
but that's also because they're old (and the front of the hoods are easy to pull away).

I'd prefer to come from the front, but the flexible hoods seem to be bonded to the hard plastic front piece.

A 2007 thread recommended coming in from the front, but I suspect that back then the Campy 9 or 10 hoods were not fixed to a hard plastic front piece.

Any suggestions?
You're obviously trying to put a Campy ERGO hood on a Shimano "brifter", since there is no such thing as a Campy "brifter".
 

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There's just something about that word.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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It's not attached to the plastic, just pop out the rubber nubs and peel it back until you have access to the bolt. If you spray some lube in there and use a hair dryer to warm up the hood it's a heck of a lot easier.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I'm wrestling with the Chorus 11 shifter hoods.
Getting access to the securing band bolt is tough.

Campy 8 hoods are much easier (from the front and from the back),
but that's also because they're old (and the front of the hoods are easy to pull away).

I'd prefer to come from the front, but the flexible hoods seem to be bonded to the hard plastic front piece.

A 2007 thread recommended coming in from the front, but I suspect that back then the Campy 9 or 10 hoods were not fixed to a hard plastic front piece.

Any suggestions?
ftfy...
 

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All you need is a T25 screwdriver, inserted from the front of the hood. It helps to pull back the back edge of the hood, to expose the torx head, so you can see the end of the screwdriver.

The older models were a little easier. You insert a 5mm hex wrench from the front and with a little wiggling, it usually fell into place.
 

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All you need is a T25 screwdriver, inserted from the front of the hood. It helps to pull back the back edge of the hood, to expose the torx head, so you can see the end of the screwdriver.

The older models were a little easier. You insert a 5mm hex wrench from the front and with a little wiggling, it usually fell into place.
C-40 a bit of thread drift here: what are your thoughts on Torx vs. allen heads for bike components? Do you think they bring anything to the party? In several decades of bike work I've never felt there was a problem with allen heads.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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C-40 a bit of thread drift here: what are your thoughts on Torx vs. allen heads for bike components? Do you think they bring anything to the party? In several decades of bike work I've never felt there was a problem with allen heads.
Just FYI Campy switched their heads to Torx when they switched from steel to aluminum fasteners. I believe this is true for all their crank, brake, and lever fasteners. The aluminum Allen heads would likely strip too easily.
 

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C-40 a bit of thread drift here: what are your thoughts on Torx vs. allen heads for bike components? Do you think they bring anything to the party? In several decades of bike work I've never felt there was a problem with allen heads.
For the small fasteners, the Torx are the way to go - as you don't have the option to use a balldriver. Ball drivers and small fasteners don't mix, torx forces a better engagement and loading surfaces on the tool/fastener interface.
 

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TORX has several advantages over hex. Including the ability to hold the screw on the tool.

The Torx design allows for a higher torque to be exerted than a similarly-sized conventional hex socket head without damaging the head and/or the tool.
Torx - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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For the small fasteners, the Torx are the way to go - as you don't have the option to use a balldriver. Ball drivers and small fasteners don't mix, torx forces a better engagement and loading surfaces on the tool/fastener interface.
There actually are Torx balldrivers available, eg see:
Star Tip - BallStar? Tip L-Wrenches

I don't much like ball driver hex wrenches, except in special circumstances.

I wish more bike screws were Torx, they grip so much better.
 
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