Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I know C40 amongst others will know this, but what is the secret to replacing brake pads on Campy shoes. To me this is always worse than putting on a new tubular tire. Guys what the secret?
 

·
Squirrel Hunter
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
Pull

wheel_suker said:
Ok, I know C40 amongst others will know this, but what is the secret to replacing brake pads on Campy shoes. To me this is always worse than putting on a new tubular tire. Guys what the secret?
I sometimes use a pair of pliers and gently grip the pads and pull them out (and in). Pushing just seems to bunch the rubber up and makes it harder to get out.
 

·
Every little counts...
Joined
·
3,924 Posts
I'll toss new pads in my wash pail (hot soapy water) to soften them, and the soap lubricates them to slide on. Yes, pull them on works better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Taking them out

- Put the edge of a thin flat head screw driver behind the pad and slowly work it out.

Install

- Put some thin oil (I use bike lube) on the back of the brake pad and in the slot. The sucker just slides in. Make sure to clean any excess lube off the pad. Try not to get any on the actual braking surface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys I'll try that starting with the soap. Obvoiusly a rag must be used together with the pliers to avoid marring the shoe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
I just changed my pads on the rain bike yesterday. I took the shoes off the calipers and clamped the rubber portion in the vice with moderate pressure. I used a block of wood to push on the aluminum portion near the center bolt.

To reassemble them, I only used water but soap would have helped also.

I was installing Kool Stops (black) instead of the Campy pads. They are trememdous! Far better stopping and very smooth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
to remove old pads, clamp the pad in a vise, thread on the brake shoe nut and the tap on the nut with a plastic mallet.

When installing pads use isopropyl alcohol as a lubricant. It works great and dissisapates quickly.

you could even use a little alcohol for removing.

For shops, or the guy who has to have everything, Jagwire makes a cool looking tool for install and removal of brake pads... scroll down to bottom of page

http://www.jagwireusa.com/eliteroad.html
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top