Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Chorus 10 spd cassette with about 3,000 miles on it. One shop said I might want to replace it since I just got a new crank. Another shop said it looks fine and don't bother. So what is the normal life span on their cassettes? I spin more than mash the big gears, but there are plenty hills here. Admittedly, I wasn't the best at keeping my old chain clean (changed my ways after snapping one on a climb and shelling out $55 to the LBS -- chain = labor).
 

·
Shirtcocker
Joined
·
60,886 Posts
cmd miler said:
I have a Chorus 10 spd cassette with about 3,000 miles on it. One shop said I might want to replace it since I just got a new crank. Another shop said it looks fine and don't bother. So what is the normal life span on their cassettes? I spin more than mash the big gears, but there are plenty hills here. Admittedly, I wasn't the best at keeping my old chain clean (changed my ways after snapping one on a climb and shelling out $55 to the LBS -- chain = labor).
Dunno...but a hell of a lot more than 3,000 miles in my opinion--especially for what they are charging for one these days. Replace chain at about that (I do about every 5,000) and you shouldn't need to replace the cassette for a long time. I bet I have 10k+ on mine now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,161 Posts
search....

Do a search on chain life and you'll get some of my detailed responses regarding cassette life and how to get the most from one.

3K is nothing, unless you take poor care of the chain and/or run a chain for too long at a time, before switching to a new one.

It is possible to wear out a cassette with one chain, but it took me 6,000 miles to wear out one cog, the 19T.

I learned that using a 3-chain rotation can greatly extend cassette life, if the chains are alternated before they are half worn. With Campy UN chains, you need a Wipperman 10S1 connex link, a Forster superlink model 4 or SRAM 10 powerloc to rejoin the chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
C-40 said:
Do a search on chain life and you'll get some of my detailed responses regarding cassette life and how to get the most from one.

3K is nothing, unless you take poor care of the chain and/or run a chain for too long at a time, before switching to a new one.

It is possible to wear out a cassette with one chain, but it took me 6,000 miles to wear out one cog, the 19T.

I learned that using a 3-chain rotation can greatly extend cassette life, if the chains are alternated before they are half worn. With Campy UN chains, you need a Wipperman 10S1 connex link, a Forster superlink model 4 or SRAM 10 powerloc to rejoin the chain.
a) I did. Didn't come up with anything. Did you?
b) thanks for the info. I didn't think 3k was much at all either. The first shop was more focused on MTB than road and hasn't worked much (if at all) on Campy. In fact, I don't know how the rejoined the chain, but there aren't any stiff links. I started going to another shop who seems to have better mechanics.
 

·
Squirrel Hunter
Joined
·
3,854 Posts
Long Live Campy

C-40 said:
3K is nothing, unless...
...you just got a new crank and the shop wants to get some more money out of you.

I swap cassettes a lot depending on terrain but can tell you that 3K is not going to show enough wear to warrant replacement. My wife's cassette easily has 10K on it and I just used it last month on my bike for Ride The Rockies. Her old cassette performed perfectly with the new chain I had on my bike. Ride On!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,832 Posts
Recent change-out

cmd miler said:
I have a Chorus 10 spd cassette with about 3,000 miles on it. One shop said I might want to replace it since I just got a new crank. Another shop said it looks fine and don't bother. So what is the normal life span on their cassettes? I spin more than mash the big gears, but there are plenty hills here. Admittedly, I wasn't the best at keeping my old chain clean (changed my ways after snapping one on a climb and shelling out $55 to the LBS -- chain = labor).
I just swapped out a Veloce cassette (all-steel cogs) after 17,000 miles. I went through 2 chains in that time frame, but used them sequentially (did not swap). A very large portion of my mileage is on the 19 cog because I live on truly flat land. The 19 cog was the only one that was worn out (new chain skipped when I pedaled hard) so I may just get a new 19 and put that cassette back on :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,863 Posts
I can get about 8K out of a Campy (Chorus cassette). It's very hilly where I ride. I use the small ring alot, plus I am a big rider. 3K is nothing,

Buy a lockring remover and a chain whip. Buy your cassettes online (probikekit,com has good prices). Swap out your own cassettes.

Keeping you driveline clean will prolong cassette life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Your bike shop mechanic knows not what he is talking about or he only has experience working on mountain bikes in muddy environments.

I have about 18,000-20,000 on my Chorus cassette and experience know problems what so ever. I do thoroughly clean it after every third ride.

Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,161 Posts
results..

I found quite a few threads discussing chain and cog life, but it's been quite awhile since I've posted my lengthy info on the subject. Here it is again.



None of the common chain wear measuring tools, including the Park chain checker produces an accurate measurement of chain elongation (change in pitch) because these tools add roller wear to the measurement and most measure over a very short length. The roller wear can be as large as the elongation, so the tool may report twice the actual elongation. Many riders are tossing their chains when they are only half worn.

One way to measure elongation is with a 12" scale. Place an accurate 12” scale on the edge of a pin. The pin at the opposite end will be totally covered when the chain is new. As the chain wears, this pin will begin to “peak out” from under the scale. Change the chain before ½ of this pin is exposed. The maximum commonly recommended wear is 1/16” (.063”) per foot. One half of a pin is slightly more (.070 inch).

Elongation is only half of the chain wear issue. The rollers also wear – as much as 20-30 time more than the pins and their mating bushing (which causes elongation). New rollers will measure .200 - .210 inch in between them, depending on the brand. When this distance increases to .235-.240, I consider the chain to be shot. It is possible to have this much roller wear and very little elongation. I've had a chain with 6000 miles of use, that had only 1/4 of the allowable elongation, but rollers were extremely worn. Some calipers can reach deep enough to measure the distance between the rollers. But I prefer a cheap home made plug gage. I took a 6mm hex wrench and ground it down to a thickness of about .070 inch to fit between the inner plates of the narrowest chain.

Lateral wear (side flex) also plays a role in shifting performance. The longest I've use a Campy 10 chain is 6000 miles, but even at this point the lateral wear was not degrading the shifting significantly. A new chain will have .004-.008 inch of clearance, while my chain with 6000 miles on it had .012-013. A feeler gage will quickly tell you the amount of clearance between the inner and outer plates.

Changing a chain long before these wear criteria is met is not likely to increase cog life. It's entirely possible to wear out at least one or two cogs over the life of a single chain, if it's used for too long. I've used a single chain for 6000 miles, and worn out one cog, even though the chain showed little elongation. The only practical way to detect a worn cog is by installing a new chain. If the chain skips on a cog, while pedaling under a heavy load, then the cog is too worn to use with a new chain. If you install a new chain and don't get skipping with any of the cogs, there is no reason to change the cassette.

The best way to maximize cog life is to alternate the use of 3 chains, changing every 2000 miles, or at least before each chain is half worn. With this method a new chain will never be installed on worn cogs. With the proper rotation, the third new chain will not skip when it's installed on the cassette. When all of the chains are worn out, then most likely the cassette will be too. I aim for 5,000 miles from a Campy UN chain and 15,000 from the cassette.
 

·
Shirtcocker
Joined
·
60,886 Posts
C-40 said:
With this method a new chain will never be installed on worn cogs.
Well...wouldn't the 2nd chain be installed after 2k of wear and the 3rd chain be installed after 4k of wear?

I'm sure there's a reason to do this I'm not thinking of, but I usually just replace chains at 5k and don't bother with rotation. I'm close to chain #3 now on the same cassette.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,161 Posts
yes...

Bocephus Jones II said:
Well...wouldn't the 2nd chain be installed after 2k of wear and the 3rd chain be installed after 4k of wear?

I'm sure there's a reason to do this I'm not thinking of, but I usually just replace chains at 5k and don't bother with rotation. I'm close to chain #3 now on the same cassette.
Perhaps I should have said excessively worn cogs or wornout cogs. The key is to get all the chains into the rotation before you encounter chain skip. If you install a third new chain after 10,000 miles, you're almost guaranteed to get chain skip. I managed to get skipping on the 19T tooth cog when I left a chain on for 6,000. That chain showed hardly any elongation, but the rollers were quite worn. I managed to wear out both the 19 and 21T cogs on a Record cassette with only 4,000 miles on one chain. You can take a chain with perhaps as little as a few hundred miles of use on it and run it on those same wornout cogs without skipping.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top