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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So the guy at the LBS where I just got my first road bike kept telling me not to do anything to it in the first year, to just bring it in. He made it sound like this was more of a warning than a "don't worry, we can do it for you if you want" kind of thing. I've already changed out the pedals and the saddle... do you think they'll be like... mad or whatever?? Or was this even the kind of thing they were talking about?? Do they normally tell people this?? what's the deal? I like working on stuff on my bike (basic minor stuff or whatever) but I don't wanna do anything to get off to a bad start with this shop. What should I do?
 

· Devoid of all flim-flam
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Carbon fiber parts and titanium screws & such can be delicate and it's best to use a torque wrench with them, but in general bicycles are almost tailor made for backyard tinkering. And don't they sell tools at the shop, anyway?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, they sell all kinds of crazy bike-specific tools there. So far though, the allen wrenches, screwdrivers, etc are enough for anything I know how to do. He just made it sound like "don't mess with anything on the bike, you'll probably just screw it up and then we'll haffta fix it". I think he could tell I was fairly new to the whole road biking thing. But who knows, maybe I'm just being overly sensitive.
 

· Anti-Hero
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I've built my last two bikes with just a little help from someone that's done it before, and nothing has exploded yet.

Stuff like pedals & saddles are pretty hard to screw up. Just do what you're comfortable with, and take it in for anything else. Like someone else said- carbon & ti stuff is best torqued with a torque wrench, but that doesn't mean you can't get one & do it yourself. The Park Tools website has some pretty good how-to articles as well.
 

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Yer LBS guy sounds like a jerk. I'd find a new shop, one with employees that actually want you to learn how to take care of your stuff and are willing to teach.

I build and repair my own bikes. The only time the LBS sees them is to do stuff with really expensive tools that I don't own, like headset pressing, or BB shell facing and thread chasing.
 

· I ride in circles..
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90% of the work thats needed on a bike you can do yourself with little money invested in tools.. The rest of the jobs take some special tools that just aren't worth buying unless you're rich or own a fleet of bikes. I do all my own work.. and I'm lucky that my shop lets me use some of the tools I don't have.. Headset presses, star nut setting tool.. stuff like that..
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Becky said:
Yer LBS guy sounds like a jerk. I'd find a new shop, one with employees that actually want you to learn how to take care of your stuff and are willing to teach.
I would maybe, but I just got the bike there and it has the 1 year of free whatever... like tune-ups and stuff... and it's close... and small, which I like... I'm just kinda wondering if I should like... Replace the seat and everything with the stuff that was on there before I bring it in.
 

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MWPDX said:
So the guy at the LBS where I just got my first road bike kept telling me not to do anything to it in the first year, to just bring it in. He made it sound like this was more of a warning than a "don't worry, we can do it for you if you want" kind of thing. I've already changed out the pedals and the saddle... do you think they'll be like... mad or whatever?? Or was this even the kind of thing they were talking about?? Do they normally tell people this?? what's the deal? I like working on stuff on my bike (basic minor stuff or whatever) but I don't wanna do anything to get off to a bad start with this shop. What should I do?
Most shops offer a free checkup/tuneup when you buy a bike from them. Probably worth it to take advantage of a skilled wrench giving your bike the once over. No reason you can't work on it yourself though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bocephus Jones II said:
Most shops offer a free checkup/tuneup when you buy a bike from them. Probably worth it to take advantage of a skilled wrench giving your bike the once over. No reason you can't work on it yourself though.
Ok well... I guess I'll go ahead and take it back in there with it's new (new to the bike) pedals and saddle and everything... but if he yells at me, I'm blaming you guys!!:p
 

· Adorable Furry Hombre
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Andrea138 said:
I've built my last two bikes with just a little help from someone that's done it before, and nothing has exploded yet.

Stuff like pedals & saddles are pretty hard to screw up. Just do what you're comfortable with, and take it in for anything else. Like someone else said- carbon & ti stuff is best torqued with a torque wrench, but that doesn't mean you can't get one & do it yourself. The Park Tools website has some pretty good how-to articles as well.

Well said Andrea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
brujenn said:
Hey MW - another pdxer here. Which is your lbs? Just give a clue if you don't want to reveal....

Absolutely work on your bike.
Hmm ok... well it's in St. Johns... and it's got an antique looking like... bike taxi type deal out front... I'm not sure what those things are called
 

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Bocephus Jones II said:
Most shops offer a free checkup/tuneup when you buy a bike from them. Probably worth it to take advantage of a skilled wrench giving your bike the once over. No reason you can't work on it yourself though.
BJ makes a good point 'bout the free tuneup (I missed that part about "the first year" in the OP :blush2: ). Definitely take advantage of free adjustments, but don't let that stop you from learning to do the little adjustments and repairs yourself.
 

· Worker Ant
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sounds like their trying to put a bit of fright in you to keep you coming back for repairs they can charge you for. nice they offer the free thing for the first year, but it's your bike, you do whatever the hell you want to it. but it would be in your best interest if you learned how to work on it. park has a nice website and books, get Zinn's book on road bikes or see if another shop in the area offers any mechanic lessons. i did that and it was great, learned a lot and i changed out a bunch of parts while the teacher was there to make sure i did it correctly.
 

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#1) It's your bike. You can do what you want with it. If the shop's mad, there's other places for your business.

#2) That said, if you break something don't expect them to cover it under warranty. Which doesn't mean you should let them tell you that your new saddle caused the bottom bracket to come loose or something crazy like that.

#3) Realistically, they aren't likely to know what you did. If they're anything like the shops in my area, they see bikes in and out of the place all the time, and they certainly aren't going to remember what saddle and what pedals are on the bike, or who put them on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
russotto said:
#3) Realistically, they aren't likely to know what you did.
Maybe... but they don't usually seem that busy and the stuff I put on there isn't exactly standard road bike type stuff. The saddle is big and cushy and pretty torn up and the pedals are big heavy platform pedals w/ those spike things on em... But I dunno... Hopefully you're right and they won't notice or won't care.
 

· i like whiskey
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I think your mechanic meant to not be messing with the derailler limit screws and cable tension and things like that. You can get the shifting all goofed up if you aren't careful. When you take it in for a tune up, take it during a slow time and ask if you can watch the guy do his work and ask him to explain what he's doing. That way you can learn a little.

Swapping out saddles and pedals is pretty much expected with any bike, and those are definitely easy jobs on any bike. You should absolutely do them yourself.
 

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innergel said:
I think your mechanic meant to not be messing with the derailler limit screws and cable tension and things like that. You can get the shifting all goofed up if you aren't careful. When you take it in for a tune up, take it during a slow time and ask if you can watch the guy do his work and ask him to explain what he's doing. That way you can learn a little.

Swapping out saddles and pedals is pretty much expected with any bike, and those are definitely easy jobs on any bike. You should absolutely do them yourself.
First thing I do is strip off all the useless reflectors and dork guards and stupid safety warning stickers.
 
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