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I took my new bike back to the shop yesterday as the front tire was defective so the mechanic removed the wheel and replaced the tire.

When I got home and tried to loosen the skewer to remove the wheel it was exceedingly tight and difficult to unlock.

I noticed this morning after I put the wheel on there is what sounds like a slight rubbing noise when I spin it.

I didn't notice the noise yesterday, I don't know if it makes any difference - the wheel is a disc type.

Could the over tightening have an effect of the bearing races or whatever?

Thanks in advance?
 

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Yes - over-tightening can cause problems. First and foremost it can skew how your wheels sit in the dropouts, causing (among other things) your brake pads to rub on your rotors and a lot of unnecessary pressure on your hubs. It also severely stresses the skewers themselves and if they're too tight for long enough, they can fail - and if that were to happen while riding it could ultimately cause you to loose a wheel (at speed) - not a good time! People think I'm nuts, but I've always been a proponent of very high-quality skewers for QR wheelsets (which are typically pretty expensive. Believe me - all skewers are NOT created equal. Get yourself a very well engineered set of external-cam skewers made from top quality materials, don't over-tighten them and you'll never have to worry about your wheel's connection points again.
 

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People think I'm nuts, but I've always been a proponent of very high-quality skewers for QR wheelsets (which are typically pretty expensive. Believe me - all skewers are NOT created equal. Get yourself a very well engineered set of external-cam skewers made from top quality materials,
I've become convinced of the superiority of the older external cam design. In shopping around recently it seems that Shimano is the only major brand that still sells such skewers, and for a while now the Ultegra 6800 skewers have been backordered at many places (and marked up in price at those that have them in stock).

Does anyone know of other sources for quality but affordable external cam skewers?
 

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I've become convinced of the superiority of the older external cam design. In shopping around recently it seems that Shimano is the only major brand that still sells such skewers, and for a while now the Ultegra 6800 skewers have been backordered at many places (and marked up in price at those that have them in stock).

Does anyone know of other sources for quality but affordable external cam skewers?
Quality - yes. Affordable - not really. The set I ended up buying is as good a set as you'd ever probably be able to get - but they were expensive (I got the 25th Anniversary Paul Components Engineering QR set - extremely well made and high quality and very cool looking too ;-) ). I still need to buy 1 more set for the wife's bike - but if I could find something of equal (or at least nearly equal) quality for less, I'd be very interested in that as well!
 

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I've been having a booger of a time picking up more Dura-Ace or Ultegra skewers for the last year or two. They're hard to come by for a reasonable price, especially in a set. They're the only kind of skewers I'll use. I make them reasonably tight but nothing super crazy. They do their job perfectly, much more than I can say for the vast majority of skewers out there.
 

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Quality - yes. Affordable - not really. The set I ended up buying is as good a set as you'd ever probably be able to get - but they were expensive (I got the 25th Anniversary Paul Components Engineering QR set - extremely well made and high quality and very cool looking too ;-) ). I still need to buy 1 more set for the wife's bike - but if I could find something of equal (or at least nearly equal) quality for less, I'd be very interested in that as well!
Just looked them up – WOW, amazing! Looks like the highest quality, indeed. And not at all affordable! :)

I finally just placed an order online for a backordered Ultegra 6800 skewer set. I had to wait to get them, but they were $20 for the set.

I think the Dura Ace 9000 skewer set are more frequently in stock, and run about $80 for the set. Those are very nice, but at that price, the ones you bought are probably worth the small bump up in cost.
 

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Only problem I've ever seen is snapping a Ti skewer, likely from years of over-tightening and work hardening. If the wheel's in straight and your dropouts aren't made of an unusually soft carbon or aluminum it won't do anything else.
 

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"other sources for quality but affordable external cam skewers?"

Campy & Zipp skewers are also external cam & excellent quality.
Personally I'd avoid titanium axle skewers. Weight difference to steel axle, is negligible -- maybe 10 grams? (0.3 oz).
Steel is significantly stronger than Ti. This doesn't seem a good place to go weight-weenie ... a failure would lead to catastrophic crash.
 

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"other sources for quality but affordable external cam skewers?"

Campy & Zipp skewers are also external cam & excellent quality.
Personally I'd avoid titanium axle skewers. Weight difference to steel axle, is negligible -- maybe 10 grams? (0.3 oz).
Steel is significantly stronger than Ti. This doesn't seem a good place to go weight-weenie ... a failure would lead to catastrophic crash.
Absolutely, whole-heartedly, unequivocally agreed! I went with stainless steel myself.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I've become convinced of the superiority of the older external cam design. In shopping around recently it seems that Shimano is the only major brand that still sells such skewers, and for a while now the Ultegra 6800 skewers have been backordered at many places (and marked up in price at those that have them in stock).

Does anyone know of other sources for quality but affordable external cam skewers?
No...Shimano are INTERNAL cam skewers. They are pretty much the best you can get, but they're NOT external.

Quality - yes. Affordable - not really. The set I ended up buying is as good a set as you'd ever probably be able to get - but they were expensive (I got the 25th Anniversary Paul Components Engineering QR set - extremely well made and high quality and very cool looking too ;-) ). I still need to buy 1 more set for the wife's bike - but if I could find something of equal (or at least nearly equal) quality for less, I'd be very interested in that as well!
I've been having a booger of a time picking up more Dura-Ace or Ultegra skewers for the last year or two. They're hard to come by for a reasonable price, especially in a set. They're the only kind of skewers I'll use. I make them reasonably tight but nothing super crazy. They do their job perfectly, much more than I can say for the vast majority of skewers out there.
As I said before, pretty much the best.

"other sources for quality but affordable external cam skewers?"

Campy & Zipp skewers are also external cam & excellent quality.
Personally I'd avoid titanium axle skewers. Weight difference to steel axle, is negligible -- maybe 10 grams? (0.3 oz).
Steel is significantly stronger than Ti. This doesn't seem a good place to go weight-weenie ... a failure would lead to catastrophic crash.
Campy are INTERNAL, Zipp is external. Bontrager make very internal cam skewers as well.
 

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cxrench,
Yes, you're absolutely correct, I erred.
I "mis-remembered" & my Campy skewers are indeed internal cam.
I think "internal" or "external" is not as important as quality of execution. There's surely good & bad implementations of both cam types.
Although, I do like that external cam types are more easily cleaned if they get gunked up.
 

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Which is why you want internal cam skewers...they don't get dirty cuz the cam is inside. You drop your bike or wheel w/ an external cam and it's instantly messed up.
 

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True that over-tightening anything including skewers can be a bad thing, but in my experience a TON of people do not tighten their skewers enough...

While on conversation of skewers, DT Swiss RWS design (which you can also find on Syncros-branded stuff) is pretty nice, although not light or pretty.
 

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I get along pretty well with the DT RWS skewers, except for one thing. They tend to rattle. I put a small rubber band around mine to quiet them down. Unfortunately, this makes them a bit more difficult to install/remove.

I still prefer my beloved Dura-Ace skewers. Very nice piece of kit...
 

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Sorry for my contribution to the confusion here, in repeating the mix-up between internal and external. I understand the difference, but I got the names backwards.

I do have one question: can someone explain the difference between internal cam skewers like the Shimano, where the cam mechanism is off to the side, versus a skewer like those that come with Campy Zondas where the mechanism is "centered." It seems like two different approaches, and I was never really clear if the Campy's were internal or external. cxwrench has clarified that they are internal, but they clearly work differently than the Shimano internal mechanism. I've never seen the difference explained.
 

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Which is why you want internal cam skewers...they don't get dirty cuz the cam is inside. You drop your bike or wheel w/ an external cam and it's instantly messed up.
Wow - what a bonehead I am ;-) - I completely flipped internal/external as well! My apologies - I think I started that mess and I hope I didn't add too much to the confusion either.

My Paul Comp. skewers are INTERNAL cam and made from stainless steel (shaft & handle) and 7075 Aluminum heads (which is one of the strongest aluminum alloys - both in tensile strength and 'hardness'). Bottom line for me is that it is most certainly worth paying a little more for quality and good design - especially for a component that quite literally holds our wheels to our bikes! I believe that a lot of people relegate the lowly QR skewer to the realm of 'afterthought' - but they really shouldn't be.
 

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I've become convinced of the superiority of the older external cam design. In shopping around recently it seems that Shimano is the only major brand that still sells such skewers, and for a while now the Ultegra 6800 skewers have been backordered at many places (and marked up in price at those that have them in stock).

Does anyone know of other sources for quality but affordable external cam skewers?
Don't forget about XTR which is Shimano's mountain bike line. XTR is the Dura Ace of Mountain biking so to speak.

As far as look and feel goes, Dura Ace do seem better than XTR. But functionally XTR seems to get the job done just as well and are quite a bit cheaper.
 

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True that over-tightening anything including skewers can be a bad thing, but in my experience a TON of people do not tighten their skewers enough...

And that brings up the question. What IS the correct tightness of a skewer? I have always understood that it should be tight enough to make an imprint on your palm, but loose enough that you can push it all the way home.

I think I tend to err on the tight side. In my own experience, most people err on the loose side.
 

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And that brings up the question. What IS the correct tightness of a skewer? I have always understood that it should be tight enough to make an imprint on your palm, but loose enough that you can push it all the way home.
That doesn't say much. A reasonably strong person can "push it all the way home" and have it way way to tight.

Shimano skewers are designed so that the proper pressure is attained so that the lever starts to grab (feel resistance or however you want to say it) when it's pointing straight out.
 

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Which is why you want internal cam skewers...they don't get dirty cuz the cam is inside. You drop your bike or wheel w/ an external cam and it's instantly messed up.
The other advantage of the internal-cam design lies in the geometry. The internal cam has a smaller radius, which creates more leverage, so a given force at the end of the lever produces more force at the moving end, compared to the larger-radius external-cam design. So you can get them tighter. (I learned this from Sheldon Brown). https://sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html
 
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