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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The rear wheel (rim) is bent on my Marin Shimano - wheel is a 32 spoke AlexRims R450. It was bent very slightly while going through a turn which transformed into a slide which then became a roll :D

The rim itself is fine cosmetically, but when I spin the wheel it rubs the brake in the same spot every complete revolution. I am a roadbike newbie, is there any process or method out there that can realign this wheel? Is it possible something else could be wrong? Thank you in advance.

-para
 

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With out seeing it and having a play as I live in Tasmania I would say take it to a good bikeshop. They would usually have a look for you for free and help you get back on the road.
 

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para_bellum said:
Any idea if there's some tool/machining process that can realign an aluminum rim?

If the rim is fine as per your first post, than your half way there and should not cost the earth..could just be the spokes that need adjusting and it usually gets done in a wheel truing tool. Save yourself the head ache and see your shop. Go to the guys that the bike came from as you already have experience with them.
 

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If you're good with your hands, truing a wheel is no big deal. You don't really even need a shop, although a truing stand does make it a little easier.

Park tool has an article on it.

http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=81

Their web site is pretty great, and covers almost all repair topics that you'll run into on a modern bike. While wheel truing is not rocket science, it can be easy to screw it up if you're not mechanically inclined.
 

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Process

para_bellum said:
Any idea if there's some tool/machining process that can realign an aluminum rim?
The "best" way to sort out a bent rim (assuming it is salvageable) is to remove all the spokes and, using both hands braced against the rim, lean on it with the wobble centered on a door frame. Start with light force, check often for straightness, and increase force as needed.

All that said, it is unlikely that you need to do anything other than true the wheel. If there is significantly uneven spoke tension after proper truing in skilled hands, then you can decide whether to start leaning on the rim to straighten it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm going to run it by REI where i originally purchased it and see what they think can be done, I actually rode with the bent rim 18 miles before I even realized it :blush2:

should probably have that pair of brakes looked at too haha
 

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para_bellum said:
I'm going to run it by REI where i originally purchased it and see what they think can be done, I actually rode with the bent rim 18 miles before I even realized it :blush2:

should probably have that pair of brakes looked at too haha
I'd hardly consider REI a compenent bike shop. I'm going to assume most of those guys simply assemble bikes out of the box and put them on the floor for sale. I think a local dedicated bike shop would be a better bet.
 

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If the wheel damage is minor enough that you could ride with it for 18 miles, it probably doesn't need anything complicated - just truing.

REIs are pretty variable. I've been favorably surprised by the one here in Seattle when I visit. The floor staff vary, but they have pretty good mechanics. If I didn't want to true a wheel myself, I wouldn't hesitate to leave it there. However, I don't know where the OP is.
 

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krisdrum said:
I'd hardly consider REI a compenent bike shop. I'm going to assume most of those guys simply assemble bikes out of the box and put them on the floor for sale. I think a local dedicated bike shop would be a better bet.
Some are really good, some aren't. Just like all other bike shops.
 

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Hank Stamper said:
Some are really good, some aren't. Just like all other bike shops.
True, forgive me, I was generalizing. I've worked in outdoor retail on and off for the last 12 years. You are going to get good and bad everywhere.

Trying to find a good mechanic is alot like trying to find a good doctor. Ask around, ask lots of questions and check their credentials.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
AndrwSwitch said:
If the wheel damage is minor enough that you could ride with it for 18 miles, it probably doesn't need anything complicated - just truing.

REIs are pretty variable. I've been favorably surprised by the one here in Seattle when I visit. The floor staff vary, but they have pretty good mechanics. If I didn't want to true a wheel myself, I wouldn't hesitate to leave it there. However, I don't know where the OP is.
Plano (North Dallas, TX) - if anyone knows a good mechanic in the area i'm totally down for hitting them up later.
 
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