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And if so, would the braking power be the same, less, or more?

I think that 6700 shifters can be used with 6800 brake calipers, and that the resulting combinaiton is a slightly stronger braking force (compared to using all 6800 shifters and brakes).

My thinking is that the pull force (leverage ratio) of the 6700 shifters is greater than that of the 6800 levers since 6800 levers were designed with the more powerful 6800 brake calipers. So when we now use the 6700 shifters with 6800 calipers, the resultant braking clamp at the calipers is greater (which of course may not always be a good thing due to wheel skid if you don't becareful).

But first question first, can the 6700 levers be used (hardware wise) with 6800 calipers. I don't see why not? But I don't know for sure.
 

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And if so, would the braking power be the same, less, or more?

I think that 6700 shifters can be used with 6800 brake calipers, and that the resulting combinaiton is a slightly stronger braking force (compared to using all 6800 shifters and brakes).

My thinking is that the pull force (leverage ratio) of the 6700 shifters is greater than that of the 6800 levers since 6800 levers were designed with the more powerful 6800 brake calipers. So when we now use the 6700 shifters with 6800 calipers, the resultant braking clamp at the calipers is greater (which of course may not always be a good thing due to wheel skid if you don't becareful).

But first question first, can the 6700 levers be used (hardware wise) with 6800 calipers. I don't see why not? But I don't know for sure.
you don't get into endos for having too much (panic) braking force on a smooth, flat road but rather because you have these circumstances met (which work against you synergetically):
- center of gravity too upfront (drop bars brifters)
- road irregularities that translate into variable, unpredictible pressure to the levers
- and especially when you are in a certain downhill decceleration


before i go further, i'll ask for appologies in advance if my guessing that you don't frequenly go into peloton style rides is wrong. or that the above circumstances are not to be expected in your applications. and for responding to this thread without having personal experience with those exact components you are requiring advice for before mounting.


from my knowledge campagnolo has, for example, a less cable pull for the front brake by the lever so that the braking force is increased as compared to the rear brake. that principle i do not know to be used by shimano for their brifters/calipers combos.

i have used shimano brifters and didn't like them as much as i liked campagnolo. now i got rid of the drop bars as i got fed up with car drivers' bad manners and neglect and the reduced potential to adapt to that stuff with a drop handlebars and regular brifters. i am very happy with this affordable and ready available combination:
- handlebars: 56cm 120 grams 7075 alloy
- front brake lever: sram FR7 (meant for disc brakes)
- rear brake lever: shimano stx
i've also mounted bars ends just next to the brake levers, towards the stem, so that i have the aero option available. they're a carbon fibre with aluminum mix so they have a nice shape and i don't get cold hands.

the front brake has a stronger force, just the way i like it. and i can put some high speed in traffic as i have the assurance of being able to take an impromptu sharp turn or brake or even both. i can easily brake on the front when getting down from the sidewalk (kerbs) for increased traction of the front wheel when i do that maneuver in a sharp angle to the kerb, with medium speed and obstacles on the sidewalk and cars are in the way.

if i were to put on a long road trip with no major traffic disturbances i'd still go for this bullhorn style approach. just that it's not a bullhorn but it's rather more comparable to aero TT bars, only to have the shifters not available on the extensions.

by the way, i ride ssp.

this is the extreme example of aero bars extension, notice the brakes are on a wide handlebar but in high speeds you get in a narrower position.
https://www.bikerumor.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/zipp-vuka-race-carbon-aero-bar-extensions01.jpg

drop bars are more useful when going in a peloton.

the bar ends for my use with flat bars:
https://static.bike-components.de/c...end-120-c387953cd544d69402e6cd966fba26ef.jpeg

what may be more suitable for long rides: cinelli spinacci
https://biketart.cc/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/spinaci.jpg

so you might consider having a mix of flat bars, levers to go with it and bar ends of some sort.

i really like having a strong brake for the front with the lever positioned in such a manner as to permit higher deccelerations.

by the way, the carbon fibre fork i use is a wound up and has a huge stiffnness to it. it's not light (500g) but is hugely stiff torsionally and laterally as it has straight and round profile legs. fore and aft movement i would not like to be too much as it makes the trail variable and that would be decreasing the steering precision. this fork is very much compatible with the flat bars and bar ends combination i described above.
 

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If you search I think you'll find people who using this combo. I remember seeing some posts of 6700 riders who upgraded to 6800 brake calipers.

I have 5700 105 shifters and use a 6800 front brake. It works fine. If it provides more leverage I can't really say but I notice the braking feels better than the 5700 caliper it replaces. I believe the 6700 pull ratio is identical to 5700.
 

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I thought I'd chime in and let the OP know I installed 6800 brakes on my bike tonight. I currently have 5700 shifters. The install went perfectly with zero issues. I'm sure they'll mate just fine to your 6700 shifters...
 
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