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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Felt Breed with DT Swiss 240s hub, every face is knurled and I am up to 45 ft lbs on a torque wrench, each side.

I am 160 lbs and haven't even raced it yet. nothing more embarrassing than chain slap and stopping to re-hang a fallen chain on a single speed. any recommendations?

the whole reason I choose this track style forkend was to avoid tensioners, eccentric bb's, etc. I guess i am the idiot.

thanks, Dave
 

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Either add a tensioner, or get some Campy style QR levers. They work very well at keeping the wheel put.
 

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singlespeed bike, no?

is your chain slapping because your rear wheel is loosening up and getting pulled in toward the frame? hence causing the chain to fall off due to too much slack?

whats wrong with the track bolts and tightening them to that horizontal dropouts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
my question exactly. I don't understand why more torque than most reasonable people can apply doesn't hold a wheel to a frame as designed and used.

so much of the motivation for the bike was its simple design and lack of fiddly-bits which I just as soon avoid if possible. Having said that, I don't like chain slack either.

thanks for the input, I appreciate it.

Dave
 

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are the bolts "stripped" not the part that threads in, but the flat inside part of the bolt that grips onto the horizontal dropout is stripped
 

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Another nod to Campy QR's

Never ridden a single speed. But I once had a wheel built with White Industry hub, Velocity rim. The thing wouldn't stay put with the skewers that came with the wheel, but since I went back to the trusty ole Campy QR skewers there's never been a problem
 

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single speed doesn't necessarily mean simple, trouble-free, or more reliable. As you are learning.

If the hub is a QR hub, check to make sure that the ends/drop-outs aren't too thin. ie: make sure that the QR (if it has one) is actually contacting the frame completely. You'd be surprised how many times slippage is caused by an axle that slightly sticks out past the drop, causing the QR to tighten against the axle; not the frame. If this is the case, try putting an axle washer on each side of the QR, between the frame and the QR. Make sure it's large enough to allow the spring to fit through. I've had to do this a few times when putting QR wheels on older road frames that previously had bolt-on wheels.
 

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PlatyPius said:
single speed doesn't necessarily mean simple, trouble-free, or more reliable. As you are learning.

If the hub is a QR hub, check to make sure that the ends/drop-outs aren't too thin. ie: make sure that the QR (if it has one) is actually contacting the frame completely. You'd be surprised how many times slippage is caused by an axle that slightly sticks out past the drop, causing the QR to tighten against the axle; not the frame. If this is the case, try putting an axle washer on each side of the QR, between the frame and the QR. Make sure it's large enough to allow the spring to fit through. I've had to do this a few times when putting QR wheels on older road frames that previously had bolt-on wheels.

Listen to him.....this is a common problem when using a QR hub with track dropouts...

If the part between the red lines is wider than the dropout, all the tension in the world isn't going to keep the wheel in place
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
no quick release, its a through bolt with knurled 8mm tappered head allen drive on each side torqued to 45 ft lbs which is tighter than any of us can get with standard bike hand tools (i am using a 24" professional torque wrench)
 

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bouldersscx said:
no quick release, its a through bolt with knurled 8mm tappered head allen drive on each side torqued to 45 ft lbs which is tighter than any of us can get with standard bike hand tools (i am using a 24" professional torque wrench)
I would still check the length of the axle from locknut to end. I'll bet those 45 ft/lbs are pushing on the axle, not the frame.
 
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