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naranjito
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had a carbon clincher rim fail at the bead hook or sidewall? I don't mean spoke hole failures, but a failure from over inflation / hard braking / hitting something. I was reading zipp's argument for not making a carbon clincher rim earlier, and wondered if anyone had actually had a rim fail in those conditions. Most carbon clinchers seem to have a max pressure of 8 bar, which is more or less the pressure I use. I guess there's a safety margin in there somewhere, but have no idea what it could be, and it's slightly worrying to think that the max pressure is right at or just above the normal usage pressure. I don't have any carbon rims, I'm just curious.

thanks, foz
 

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"a carbon clincher rim fail from hitting something"

How about a carbon tubular?

 

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naranjito
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Obviously any rim of any material can fail if you hit something hard enough, but I was referring more to zipp's argument that carbon bead hooks are not as strong as alu ones at withstanding high pressures generated by heating the tyre/rim combo during braking, and this can make the rim more likely to break if it hits something. Although tub rims can also be broken if you hit something hard enough, I think they are generally considered to be stronger in impact situations because they don't have the sidewalls and bead hooks that are what take the hits and suffer the consequences in a clincher rim. The Lew carbon clinchers seem to be a good idea, as they don't have a hook to hold the tyre on and so can do away with the pressure limitation. They still have an extended sidewall though, but from the little I've seen of them, it's much thicker and probably stronger than a traditional sidewall. At the moment, all other carbon clinchers have a traditional bead hook, which is the weak point in this type of rim.
 

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wheelbuilder
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filtersweep said:
Yes--- I owned a set of HED Alps. Probably not the best thing to base an opinion on--- but it was before I discovered tubulars.

I have my share of tubular wheels, but I have to tell you, I've had Reynolds DV 46 rims built up and currently have the Edge 38s built up. They are incredible rims. I will get a pair of the SDV66 on the road at some point.

I still love the ultimate low weight/strength of tubulars and I'm getting some Edge 24mm any day now (should be around 215g a rim). Should be real easy to get those under the 1kg mark. However, when you are dealing with more aero wheels in the 40mm and over range (Edge 38 are more like 41mm), I'm less concerned with absolute weight. I ride them on relatively flat terrain and rollers where I actually like the added rim weight. Hauling around in the mid 20s the extra momentum, albeit very small, is welcome. My current set is 1422g so they are not porkers by any comparison.

-Eric
 

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filtersweep said:
Yes--- I owned a set of HED Alps. Probably not the best thing to base an opinion on--- but it was before I discovered tubulars.
Those aren't really carbon clinchers...more like a low spoke count alu rim with a fairing.

I have Williams 50C full carbon clinchers and they are damn fine wheels. I was run into a ditch a few weeks ago and rode through some gnarly stuff. No issues...
 

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naranjito
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785 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ergott, have you ever seen or heard of carbon clincher failures? I'm just curious, maybe because I'd like a set of deep carbon rims, but don't really want to go to tubs.

I'm having a hard time trying to justify a set of deep section carbon clinchers though - they weigh and cost a lot more than the same rim in tubular version (I know aero is important, but with the climbs we have here I want something light too, and there is also a fairly large difference between the cost of a carbon clincher + tyre and carbon tub + tub).

I think the question that I really need the answer to is if for a given deep section (say 50mm) rim the convenience of the clincher version makes up for the weight and cost penalty over the tub version?

thanks, foz
 

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wheelbuilder
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foz said:
Ergott, have you ever seen or heard of carbon clincher failures? I'm just curious, maybe because I'd like a set of deep carbon rims, but don't really want to go to tubs.

I'm having a hard time trying to justify a set of deep section carbon clinchers though - they weigh and cost a lot more than the same rim in tubular version (I know aero is important, but with the climbs we have here I want something light too, and there is also a fairly large difference between the cost of a carbon clincher + tyre and carbon tub + tub).

I think the question that I really need the answer to is if for a given deep section (say 50mm) rim the convenience of the clincher version makes up for the weight and cost penalty over the tub version?

thanks, foz
I don't know of any myself. I've tried to abuse mine in the spirit of testing and they come up roses all the time. I've hit some nasty stuff with them and ridden them off road.

-Eric
 

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Cat Herder
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?

filtersweep said:
Of course--- but that doesn't change my opinion that a tubular all-carbon is a better choice.

based on.................???

I've ridden my Renolds DV Carbon Clinchers for over 3000 miles in the last 2 years. EVERY day. No problems.

In my opinion Zipp's stance is such ONLY because they don't offer all carbon clinchers in their line up. The day they decide to release a set you'll no longer be able to find that comment.
 

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I ride a set of carbon clinchers

And like them quite a bit. I bought a pair of Grammo Viper 50C earlier this year and have put about 850 miles on them. They seem too be holding up fine. I weigh 195 lbs and take them over gravel roads and over rail road tracks and other similar stuff. The only downside I've found is that they don't modulate braking as well as my Open Pro's. They still have plenty of power, just a bit grabbier is all. I can't say how they do in the wet, because it''s been such a dry summer. Full Disclosure- I work for a company that sells these wheels. I won't say who and spam the thread up. I did pay for them with my own cash, though. Maybe someday I'll bring home a decent paycheck and not so many bike parts!
 

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I suspect the same

bigdeal said:
based on.................???

I've ridden my Renolds DV Carbon Clinchers for over 3000 miles in the last 2 years. EVERY day. No problems.

In my opinion Zipp's stance is such ONLY because they don't offer all carbon clinchers in their line up. The day they decide to release a set you'll no longer be able to find that comment.
I sort of figured that also...
 

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Carbon clinchers vs carbon tubulars;
For a given wheel set, lets say Reynolds, the clincher version will be more expensive, heavier, and in the event of a high speed blow out will be more likely to have rim damage.

Tubulars have the gluing issues. Good tubulars cost a little more than good clinchers.

I'm sure the carbon clinchers are durable and hold up fine, they would just not be my choice. I don't see why folks feel the need to use them as their daily drivers, to each there own however.
I rarely use my carbon tubulars except for races, and even then don't use them in crits.
 

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Cpark
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2,106 Posts
I had a set of Reynolds DV46 clinchers (16/20) and put 10,000 plus miles with absolutely no problem. Never had to true them either and yes I did crash them twice.

My only issue was the wet braking performance and I'd get 20/24 spoke pattern.
Would I buy it again? Absolutely, if i can justfity but since I no longer race, I will keep putting money away for my kid's future education expense.....
 
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