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I am buying my first road bike. I'm looking at a new '07' Raleigh Supercourse and a new '09' Cannondale Synapse 7. The Raleigh is complete carbon fiber with 105/Tiagra components. The Cannondale is aluminum with carbon forks with Tiagra/Sora components. I'm leaning towards the Releigh do to the better components and carbon frame. I have read a lot of good reviews on both. I have also talked with to different salesmen at two different bike shops and got their pitches.

Which should I get?:confused:
 

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BAE984 said:
The blue one. Blue is faster.

But seriously...I'd go for the better components.
Or, you could even go with the one that fits you better. Just a thought :)

To the OP: frame material is NOT the determining factor in bike performance.
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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Dude, get the Raleigh. Note my bias.
 

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Larry Lackapants
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+1 for the best fit.
at tiagra/sora price level I really don't know if there'll be any advantages of a carbon frame over aluminum. other than that.. bike frames should be "mettle" like god intended. not plastic/cloth/superglue :)
good luck
brblue
 

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Le Misérable
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Ditto Kerry Irons: focus on fit first, then componentry, then the zodiac, followed by the betting line for Lyon/Barcelona Tuesday night, and THEN maybe think about frame material. It's just not that important for a first road bike in this price range...they'll both treat you fine.

IMO Sora sucks donkeys and I would never touch it.
 

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The only thing with the 'fit first' approach that I have any qualms about is that for a first road bike your fit preference will change a LOT as you get more experience. I've been riding for ~3 years, and last year was my first year racing and even then my fit evolved, though the changes were smaller. Different lengths & angle stems and seatposts are not terribly expensive and can hugely alter your position as your fit evolves.
 

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What? Me worry?
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Get the cheapest one. If it's your first road bike, you'll soon discover that you want to change everything, and if you stay with it, you'll want another and better bike in 6 months anyway. Caution....your next bike will cost at least twice as much as your first one, which is yet again another argument to make your first one the cheapest one.
 

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Le Misérable
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BAE984 said:
The only thing with the 'fit first' approach that I have any qualms about is that for a first road bike your fit preference will change a LOT as you get more experience. I've been riding for ~3 years, and last year was my first year racing and even then my fit evolved, though the changes were smaller. Different lengths & angle stems and seatposts are not terribly expensive and can hugely alter your position as your fit evolves.
That's spot-on...when I post shyte like "get the bike that fits," "the first three things you need to think about are 1) fit, 2) fit, and 3) how the bike fits," etc., I'm talking mainly about frame size: too many noobs get caught up in frame material and price and end up getting conned into a bike that's too big or too small and end up not riding much 'cuz it hurts. Once someone is on the right frame, though, you're right: that first year is one serious learning experience, and s/he can and probably will change all sorts of stuff. To me, this is a good argument against expensive professional fits, but that's off topic:).
 

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StillRiding said:
Get the cheapest one. If it's your first road bike, you'll soon discover that you want to change everything, and if you stay with it, you'll want another and better bike in 6 months anyway. Caution....your next bike will cost at least twice as much as your first one, which is yet again another argument to make your first one the cheapest one.
So true. I did manage to make it a full year, but I sextupled the price :eek6:
 

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StillRiding said:
Get the cheapest one. If it's your first road bike, you'll soon discover that you want to change everything, and if you stay with it, you'll want another and better bike in 6 months anyway. Caution....your next bike will cost at least twice as much as your first one, which is yet again another argument to make your first one the cheapest one.
I disagree with this idea. I bought a Trek Madone and haven't looked back. Love everything about it.

Get a bike that fits, that you can enjoy and one that has good components and ride it.
 
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