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What's the general consensus on carbon seat stays on an otherwise aluminum frameset? I've tested two similar bikes one with carbon seat stays and the other without and have not really noticed a difference. (This will be first bike so I'm not sure if they will make a big difference on a longer ride.) So what is your experience? Do they make a difference in the ride (race, training ride, whatever)?
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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If it doesn't make a difference to YOU, it shouldn't be important if it makes a difference for US.

Remember, people can be very discriminating, or not. Some can tell the difference between Ultegra SL and DA brakes while most can't. In any matter, this should also be a $$$ decision.

Try the bikes with a full carbon rear triangle (seat and chain stays are carbon) and see if you feel that difference.

It's my personal opinion that unless the rear triangle is full carbon, having carbon seat stays isn't as effective as a carbon post.
 

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The consensus is that it makes no difference. However, if you like the way it looks, if you think it makes a difference, if it will get you out riding more, then go for it.
 

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notwist said:
What's the general consensus on carbon seat stays on an otherwise aluminum frameset? I've tested two similar bikes one with carbon seat stays and the other without and have not really noticed a difference. (This will be first bike so I'm not sure if they will make a big difference on a longer ride.) So what is your experience? Do they make a difference in the ride (race, training ride, whatever)?
IME carbon seat stays make no difference - ever.
 

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Is this a joke?

CleavesF said:
It's my personal opinion that unless the rear triangle is full carbon, having carbon seat stays isn't as effective as a carbon post.
And since most people will tell you that a carbon seat post has no effect whatsoever :)
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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i had a frame built years ago, full steel. true temper ox platinum, w/ seat stays from the track tubeset (slightly aero, full stiff!), and after a year or so, the builder took it back and put in a carbon stay and repainted it. i put it back together w/ the same parts and wheels and could not tell a bit of difference in ride quality.
that frame also had an alloy campy seatpost, then changed later to a true temper carbon...and again no difference. i can't see a post making a big difference on a road frame unless it's big time sloping and you have a ton of post above the frame. there are lots of other things that would make a much bigger difference in what you feel than a change in seat post material. diameter of the post will have a big effect on how it flexes. i would think you could build a carbon post w/ a bunch of flex, but you'd probably find it wouldn't be super durable.
 

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I had the same experience. I tried several bikes, some with carbon stays and some without. I could feel no appreciable difference in the ride quality.

Todd
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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Yet for some reason we all can tell the difference in carbon forks and alu or steel forks. I don't understand...
 

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CleavesF said:
Yet for some reason we all can tell the difference in carbon forks and alu or steel forks. I don't understand...
Well, I don't know if we all can, but there are several possible explanations for a difference. Forks do flex in normal use, because they bear a large partially cantilevered load. So any differences in flexiblilty, elasticity, etc. will have more impact than with seatstays and seatposts, which take most of their load in compression. Perhaps just as important, we support our weight at the front end of the bike via hands and arms, which are probably much more sensitive to subtle differences in vibration patterns; hence the common experience that a carbon fork seems to damp high-frequency 'buzz" that causes fatigue in hands, arms and shoulders.
 

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JCavilia said:
Forks do flex in normal use, because they bear a large partially cantilevered load. So any differences in flexiblilty, elasticity, etc. will have more impact than with seatstays and seatposts, which take most of their load in compression. Perhaps just as important, we support our weight at the front end of the bike via hands and arms, which are probably much more sensitive to subtle differences in vibration patterns; hence the common experience that a carbon fork seems to damp high-frequency 'buzz" that causes fatigue in hands, arms and shoulders.

I agree with this whole-heartedly. A carbon fork, if anything is to be carbon, probably makes the biggest difference in overall feel of the bike. I don't think the seatpost or the rear stays really make a huge difference.

Todd
 

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JCavilia said:
Well, I don't know if we all can, but there are several possible explanations for a difference. Forks do flex in normal use, because they bear a large partially cantilevered load. So any differences in flexiblilty, elasticity, etc. will have more impact than with seatstays and seatposts, which take most of their load in compression. Perhaps just as important, we support our weight at the front end of the bike via hands and arms, which are probably much more sensitive to subtle differences in vibration patterns; hence the common experience that a carbon fork seems to damp high-frequency 'buzz" that causes fatigue in hands, arms and shoulders.
what he said...:D
 
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