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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a carbon seatpost yesterday for my Ti frame, but I don't know whether I should grease this thing or not. I tried to fit the seatpost into the frame, but it was too tight, so I'm going to sand it down a bit. What do you think?
 

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No Grease!

Never grease a CF seat post. I use a USE Alien post in my IF Crown Jewel Ti frame with no problems. Are you sure you have the correct size post for your frame? You might want to measure the diameter of the seat tube to be sure. As far as sanding, usually people sand a CF post when it is slipping. I don't know how tight it is, or how much you would have to sand to make it fit. I would measure again to be sure you hae the correct size. Good luck!
 

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NO GREASE, that is unless you want it to slip as soon as you sit on it or once you hit a pot hole. What brand of frame do you have and which carbon seatpost is it?
 

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Ditto to the others' remarks. I have an Easton cf post in a ti Seven and had no problems. Doublecheck the size and yes, no grease.
 

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Absolutes

ifcjti said:
Never grease a CF seat post.
Why? If the post slips, then it's probably best not to grease. If it doesn't slip, then the grease can prevent bonding problems with Al frames and Al sleeves in other frames. Grease doesn't bother CF composites - if it did, parts like hub shells, shift levers, derailleurs, etc. would be a problem, and they are not. Never is a pretty absolute statement.
 

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Read this first

I had a similiar issue with a CF steerer tube and an alum handlebar stem.
I did not sand down the CF tube. Instead, I took out some alum mag polish and
polished the inside of the alum stem and the outside CF steerer tube. When
I was finished, the CF steerer tube looked like a mirror and the inside
of the anodized alum stem was a little dull. Both pieces fit together like a glove.

Your mating part tolerances seem to be very tight and I would attempt to polish
mating surfaces first. Good luck and take your time. I don't see a problem in
applying grease to your parts to initially check that you have a tight sliding fit.
What about using car wax on the inside of your seat tube for the final insertion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They are both 27.2 for sure since I can actually put the seatpost into the seattube. My only concern is now whether this seatpost going to get stuck in the tube if I don't grease them. Hmm....
 

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Lennard Zinn says..

Zinn says if you can insert a c.f. seatpost into a seat tube and it slides right in with no grease, don't grease it. But if it won't slide right in, grease it (lightly)....the only problem I found is that using a c.f seatpost in a STEEL bike, is that you need something in there to prevent corrosion..ti bikes is another matter..I'd use the Zinn approach..you should not have to force the seatpost in..if so-use grease. simple enough..
 
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