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Hi there,
I want to change the stem on my Madone. Need 110mm.

I've been looking at the Zipp 145SL and the Easton EC90SL. I really like their shape.

Wanted to hear your opinion on those 2 and get other suggestions.

Thanks in advance!!
 

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You've picked some of the lightest carbon stems out there. When I went through this I realized that the aluminum stems are often as light or lighter for a whole lot less money. Any shock dampening missed using aluminum vs. carbon stem can be made up with a carbon bar instead.
 

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wyrd bið ful ãræd
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I would not trust a carbon stem as from time to time when sprinting you do put a lot of force on a stem. And like pointed out above a good alloy stem is just as light weight
Do you put less force on a bar in the same scenario?

Is it because of how the bar is clamped to the stem which actually twists the stem?

I am using an alloy stem, but only because it weighs as much as a more expensive carbon stem out there. The above quote was not part of my consideration, when it should have been (function that is), when I chose the stem ... :rolleyes:
 

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Save some money and stick with an aluminum stem. Almost as light and a lot less money. More importantly, stronger. I have a lot of carbon on my bikes, but not there. 2012 EC90 aluminum stems are being blown out right now.

Good luck
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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No Ritchey love? Their 260 WCS models are about 100 grams. I opted for the non-carbon one too because it is lighter.
 

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Alloy stems are the component that is among the highest for failures, typically due to fatigue. This is an intrinsic property of aluminum's fatigue properties and will eventually fail even without damage from a crash. I've also seen a lot of hairline cracks in stems on inspection, particularly as manufacturers push the weight down. Carbon, in contrast, isn't as susceptible to this problem (one quote from Ritchey below as illustration). Pro sprinters are now routinely using carbon stems (e.g., Cavendish has his own model) and track sprinters now use carbon stems (and bars). They are (stronger) stiffer than alloy stems.

Both stems you mention are excellent - may depend on what angle you need.



Sean Coffey of Ritchey:
“Any well-made carbon component should be removed and inspected periodically for damage (especially after crashes, shipping or any trauma) but barring any damage, carbon does not have a fatigue life like alloy components and does not fatigue over time. So in theory an undamaged carbon component should hold up indefinitely under normal riding and racing circumstance. However crashes and damage from over-clamping can dramatically reduce durability.”
 

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I guess the main question is "Are stems the right place to save lots of weight?"
 

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Titanium would be light and has does not fatigue below its fatigue threshold just like carbon but is not as brittle in clamping.
 

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Hi there,
I want to change the stem on my Madone. Need 110mm.

I've been looking at the Zipp 145SL and the Easton EC90SL. I really like their shape.

Wanted to hear your opinion on those 2 and get other suggestions.

Thanks in advance!!
Another stem to consider is the enve

They aren't necessarily lighter and they definitely cost more than their aluminum brethren

They are definitely stiff enough and if it was all about saving money we would all be riding aluminum frames with shimano 105 which is actually pretty good group set
 

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I definitely agree that for price/quality alloy is the way to go but:

I must admit that when I tried a bike that had a Time stem it was noticabley more firm during sprints than my alloy stem (which is an alloy 3T).
If you're looking to break the bank Time is definitely one to consider.

One thing to be aware of with some of these carbon stems is shape if you mount a computer to the stem. Perhaps a non-issue but some of them look like certain mounts may not work will due to the shape.
 

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If you are looking for stiffer Alloy/Carbon over wrap is an option, bit stiffer than the plain alloy, bit more weight, bit more cost.
 

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No problems with my Zipp carbon stems.
One poster said he would not trust a carbon stem because of the stresses from sprinting. I'd feel more the opposite and would replace an Al stem after "a decent amount of miles". I know Al will fatigue and can fail.

A well designed and made carbon stem will last longer than an Al one put under that same stresses.

The problem???? Carbon can be designed and made so many ways you just don't really know what you are getting. If you stick with known, well made brands like Zipp or Easton, you'll be in a good place. There are many off brand things from China or the like that you just don't know what you are getting.
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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I had an EC70 stem, was solid but a little flex in 120mm.

I have an Alu C260 Ritchey and it is easily the stiffest stem in the universe. I mean it's stiffer than my Thomson X2 and Easton EA90.

If the carbon C260 is similar... it probably is the best carbon stem to be had since I presume it has to be just as stiff.

I'm not a very powerful rider (~140 lbs) and the X2 and EA90 were plenty stiff for me but the C260 I can actually tell is stiffer believe it or not.
 
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