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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at new bikes and am seeing that every company offers a couple different types of carbon frames and all have a different name for the carbon they use. What if anything is different between Trek's OCLV Orbea's Bronze or the compound used by Specialized and how do you know which is right for your needs
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the links, very informative. So there is a difference is the grade of carbon but how does it translate to the different brands and how do I know what's best for me. My wife and I are endurance recreational riders and ride a couple hundred miles a week. I want something that will last year's and take the bite out of the chipseal vibration
 

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Thanks for the links, very informative. So there is a difference is the grade of carbon but how does it translate to the different brands and how do I know what's best for me. My wife and I are endurance recreational riders and ride a couple hundred miles a week. I want something that will last year's and take the bite out of the chipseal vibration
So what are you guys currently riding?
 

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Wife is on an all aluminum Trek flat bar hybrid and I usually ride my Specialized Allez but I have a Giant hybrid I ride for something different
This Motobecane warranty gives you some idea as to how long to expect your bike to hold up under normal conditions: Motobecane USA | Warranty If you want bikes that will prove to be most durable and provide a long service life, then that will most certainly be either steel or Titanium. A road bike with a steel frame and a carbon fiber fork should suit you guys just fine. I would suggest that you take a good look at the Jamis line of steel bikes. That's especially, the Jamis Bosanova and the Quest. You might also wanna checkout the GT Corsa 1.0. It has a chromoly steel fork, but it's a smooth ride, nonetheless. If finances are tight, then just checkout the Jamis Satellite Comp! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow, haven't seen and didn't expect that. So with a carbon frame I can expect to replace the bike or at least the frame every few years or sooner? May have to shift gears a bit and start looking at titanium
 

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Cranky Old Bastard
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So there is a difference is the grade of carbon but how does it translate to the different brands and how do I know what's best for me. My wife and I are endurance recreational riders and ride a couple hundred miles a week. I want something that will last year's and take the bite out of the chipseal vibration
You're overthinking it. It seems that every brand of bike has their proprietary weave that is superior to what anyone else has. Marketing hype.
You'd drive yourself insane trying to understand all the differences and whether they actually make a difference.

Pick a bike with a good name that fits you well.
Trust the name brand and that they make a good product and care about their quality and reputation.

All the big names make bikes that are comparable at their price point so it is really a matter of finding a good dealer and picking the bike that sings to you.

From what you've said you should concentrate on bikes with "relaxed" or "comfort" geometry because they aren't as harsh-riding as pure race bikes.

Others may argue but carbon may not last years. Carbon frames are the most likely to be damaged in a crash and may fail catastrophically. http://forums.roadbikereview.com/pinarello/pinarello-f4-13-disaster-158543.html
http://forums.roadbikereview.com/bikes-frames-forks/broke-his-pinarello-half-303050.html

If you can afford carbon take a look at titanium. It should outlast you and gives a compliant ride. Lynskey is a good brand that has some less expensive models that are priced close to carbon and less than many.
 

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Wow, haven't seen and didn't expect that. So with a carbon frame I can expect to replace the bike or at least the frame every few years or sooner? May have to shift gears a bit and start looking at titanium
Not necessarily, some carbon fiber bikes last for many years. It all depends upon your lottery! :D
 

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Not a rocket surgeon.
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Wow, haven't seen and didn't expect that. So with a carbon frame I can expect to replace the bike or at least the frame every few years or sooner? May have to shift gears a bit and start looking at titanium
No, not true. The vast majority of carbon frames have a very long service life. They are just as good as anything else for their intended puropse.

Some advice is given with an odd agenda pushing it. Zeet rides a carbon bike and rambles on and on about steel and titanium. All frame materials will serve you well of you get a bike that firs you and your riding style.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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... how do you know which is right for your needs
Forget 8r, OCLV and all the other marketing terms meant to confuse. Rather, test ride a bunch of bikes. Then you'll know.

As far as CF's durability, while all frame materials have inherent characteristics that (together with the laws of physics during a crash) dictate how they'll fare, CF has the best STW ratio, is non-corrosive and has high fatigue resistance. Below is (IMO) about the best materials comparison I've come across.

Technical White Paper | Calfee Design
 

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Most of my bikes are made of chromoly steel. I just recently bought a CF Fuji road bike. I'm still trying to get used to it. It feels strange when cornering. I can't seem to feel the road like when riding steel, or even my aluminum Trek 7.5FX. I also feel like I almost have to pamper my CF bike. I dunno, I guess I'm still in the process of adaptation.
 

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Not a rocket surgeon.
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Most of my bikes are made of chromoly steel. I just recently bought a CF Fuji road bike. I'm still trying to get used to it. It feels strange when cornering. I can't seem to feel the road like when riding steel, or even my aluminum Trek 7.5FX. I also feel like I almost have to pamper my CF bike. I dunno, I guess I'm still in the process of adaptation.
I beat the snot out of mine. I have carbon, Ti, steel and aluminum. Yep all of them. I beat them all equally and they are fine.

The best frame material is the one you ride. If you dont ride a bike, its crap.
 

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I really wonder about the unexplained CF failures that we read of here.

There was a thread last week (searched but couldn't find it) showing a bike that broke in half seemingly because the rider braked hard enough to loft his rear wheel, WTF?

Doesn't really matter to me tho. I'm old and buying Ti.
 
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I really wonder about the unexplained CF failures that we read of here.

There was a thread last week (searched but couldn't find it) showing a bike that broke in half seemingly because the rider braked hard enough to loft his rear wheel, WTF?

Doesn't really matter to me tho. I'm old and buying Ti.
I dunno just when you think CF is out of the woods, you either see or hear of yet another failed frame or fork. Like this one for example: http://forums.roadbikereview.com/motobecane-mercier/motobecane-warranty-sucks-189735.html
 
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