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papa sboak
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1,009 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently carry 2 tubes with 3 cartridges. I've yet to flat (yes, it's inevitable). I'm wondering how important it is to carry 2 inner tubes. I've noticed that most of the riders in my area carry just one tiny saddle bag. I've got a medium sized one, 2 micro sized ones and another small to medium sized bag at the front of my frame, bento box is usually empty except for food, but need it for battery for headlight. Sounds like a lot more. Empty bags are light.

1 micro under my stem (inner tube, lever, cartridge)

1 micro on the rear end of the frame (inner tube, lever, cartridge)

small/medium sized bag w/ 2 inside pockets (very lightweight 5' lock w/ luggage lock, mini-tool)

medium sized saddle bag
(my storage place for keys, wallet, food)

bento box for food/rechargeable battery

Am I carrying too much stuff? Averaging about 30mi. each ride. Wondering if 1 inner tube would be enough. Does it make a difference as far as weight/aerodynamics on recreational rides? Or am I better off carrying an extra tube? I'm kind of a boy scout so I'm rarely left unprepared. Am I overdoing it?

I could just put both tubes into my saddle bag (levers, cartridges, tool) like I used to, but then, I don't have room for wallet & keys. I kinda like having a little trunk. Advice?
 

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If it doesn't bother you to carry all that gear, 2 tubes are obviously better than 1. Personally, I carry 1 tube and a patch kit, just in case I get an additional flat (hasn't happened yet ... knock on wood). I also carry my personal effects (wallet, keys, cell phone) in my jersey pockets, so my seat pack only contains repair tools.

Cheers,
Ari
 

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Call me a Fred
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16,999 Posts
I carry two tubes and a patch kit. I don't want to be stranded.
 

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pinoy thunder
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341 Posts
I carry 2 spare tubes, a patch kit, 2 CO2 cartridges w/ inflator, and my Barbieri mini pump on long solo rides out in the mountains.
On group rides: a spare tube, a patch kit, and a CO2. Sometimes I even forget to bring anything on group rides. The older people tend to bring their whole garage anyway.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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3,806 Posts
Old Folks

stihl said:
...The older people tend to bring their whole garage anyway.
Hey, at least we are old enough to own a garage! On top of that we own so much crap that it won't all fit in the garage that is why we bring it with us.
 

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pinoy thunder
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341 Posts
Keeping up with Junior said:
Hey, at least we are old enough to own a garage! On top of that we own so much crap that it won't all fit in the garage that is why we bring it with us.
I didn't mean to offend the "senior citizens"..
I'm kidding. You can probably drop my sorry a**.. :D
 

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Government Mule
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1,326 Posts
No offense taken. BTW I had a flat yesterday on my ATB bike. The tube had that slime in it, so I prolly could have just pumped it back up, but since I was at Mama's I flipped the bike over and changed the tube in her driveway. Couldn't get that slime tube to roll up into a size I wanted to carry so I left it behind and winged it home with just my cold patches. No more slime for me. Rode over to Wally's place and got a couple of Bell tubes since I was fresh out of 26 inchers. I've got a three car garage and don't have room for my bikes so I keep a couple in Mama's garage and could have chosen to ride one of them but didn't want to part with the ATB because I'm lovin it. Not long ago I tore up the presta valve on my spare and had no choice but to patch. Two tubes is not a bad idea but I still roll with one. I go for the minimilist look sort of like dressing up for the first day on a new job, but if I see others bringing their garage then next time I'll bring mine.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Old Tubes

stihl said:
I didn't mean to offend the "senior citizens"..
I'm kidding. You can probably drop my sorry a**.. :D
No offense taken, just a poor attempt at humor. Just remember that we senior citizens carry spare tubes that were made before you were born. So when some young pup ask for a tube we give him one of the old ones that will have a slow leak over the remainder of the ride. When the time for the town line sprint comes we will drop your skinny butt as you realize a tire with 50 pounds of air has poor rolling resistance.

For the original poster - Yes you carry way too much crap for a 30 mile ride. I would pare down your list to 1 tube, 1 patch kit, 1 minipump, 2 tire levers, an allen key, 1 key (house or car - not the whole keyring), drivers license and insurance card (not the whole wallet - better yet an ID necklace with emergency contacts.
 

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Steaming piles of opinion
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10,503 Posts
It's a choice. I stopped carrying tubes years ago. For me, flats are rare enough and I'm relaxed enough that taking the extra time to patch in the field isn't a big deal. Granted, I don't tend to ride in bad weather (rain makes gluing spotty) and I am risking gashes rather than punctures. So far, my luck has held.

My riding gear is a patch kit, CO2/pump kit with 2 cartridges, multitool. Keys if needed, ID, cash and (cell if I choose it, usually don't) can all fit in a thin/medium seatpack - the long rather than the wide variety. Anything else is in jersey pockets or stays home.

Ride hydration permitting, I sometimes jam this stuff in a widemouth water bottle and carry it in the spare cage.
 

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Funny you should ask

I've always carried one tube, a patch kit, a pump, and all that other stuff one might need... or so I thought.
I intend on carrieng 2 tubes with me from now on (though I'll probably get sick of that before too long), because I slammed into a really harsh gap in the road at speed yesterday, giving myself the double snakebite - 2 flats. 2 flats with one spare tube = catching a bus. I might have been able to patch one of the tubes, but at rush hour I'd rather have just been able to swap out the tubes. Surely, a better way to deal with such things would be to REALLY make sure my tire pressure is always just so (I think they were around 95psi) and go slower when there's a chance of really horrific gaps in the road... but then there's ALWAYS a risk of that in this town, and I can't go slow no matter how hard I try!
 

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I carry one inner tube, a patch kit, and (gasp!) a pump. I have never been in such a hurry that I couldn't afford a few extra minutes to pump up a tire. And I get an infinite number of pumps, with no landfill issues.
For unsupported solo centuries on nasty roads, I might actually take an extra tube, plus an extra folding tire, and make sure the patch kit is full. But for anything on "normal" roads or under 50 miles, or in a group, one tube and a patch kit is all I take. The patch kit does contain a $1 bill for botting a torn sidewall in a pinch.

Best,
Gordon
 

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danl1 said:
Ride hydration permitting, I sometimes jam this stuff in a widemouth water bottle and carry it in the spare cage.
yeppo, thats what i do. its good, i can fit my whole keyring, mobile phone, some money, and gum in there, and use a big bottle in the other cage for drinking. Usually more than enuff for anything less than a century. There is usually a tap or two on the way anyhow.

Then use a saddle bag for tubes and levers, and use a frame mounted alloy pump. You're covered! u can usually fit 2 tubes into a saddle bag when u put the other stuff into an empty bottle. The thing with CO2 is, what happens when it runs out? SOL? pretty sure my BBB pump w/ guage is weight competitive with most of the bigger CO2 pumps as well.
 

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trying to HTFU...
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1,875 Posts
i must be carrying too much then...

i always carry:

fanny-pack:
CO2 - 2x(16gms)
superflate
patch kit(s) - an assorted collection of instant and old-style patches,
at least two glue tubes, and sandpaper in a tiny tupperware container
multi-tool
chain tool
pedro's milk levers
toe strap(for securing the front wheel)
kleenex
some loose change
wallet
cell phone

and on the bike:
a micro pump

i used to carry a tube or two, just in case for myself or others,
but have gotten too lazy to replace them.

i prefer a fanny pack to saddle packs for a couple of reasons,
1) if the saddle-pack is big enough to hold anything useful, it rubs on my legs,
2) if it's carrying enough stuff it makes the bike feel
heavier when out of the saddle(like climbing or sprinting),
3) my fanny pack is an expandable type so i can stuff tights,
arm warmers and a windbreaker in there if it warms up and i have to de-clothe.

the last two flats i got happened indoors, once before a ride and
once after; a rough spot on the rim and a slow snake-bite.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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11,979 Posts
I carry 2 tubes and a small pump. Why? I dunno. Makes me feel better.
 

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papa sboak
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1,009 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Kleenex is a must

With my allergies (I'm a geek), if I didn't carry Kleenex, my jersey & gloves would be green at the end of a 2 hour ride. I'll post a pic of my setup when I (really) get up. Still sleepwalking.
 

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Cowboy up
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3,886 Posts
I carry one tube, a patch kit, frame pump, and a big tube of glue (8 cm long) that came with a hardware store patch kit (with those big squares of rubber). I save the small tube of glue that comes with a small patch kit as a backup. The large tube is the one I use to fix flats at home so I tend to know its condition. And that said, I just looked at it and the cap broke off from a hasty bag pack and glue dried around the end. Still good glue in it however.

One time I went to fix a flat with the small tube of glue and squeezed the tube. Fssssh. Nothing but air came out. The cap didn't seal and the glue dried up. I think I happened to be at home at the time fortunately instead of 10 miles into the woods on some mtb ride. That's why I don't rely on the small tubes for multiple uses.

Energy bar wrappers make a good tire boot. I also carry a small first aid kit with a copy of my drivers license and insurance card in it. It's in a water/sweat proof zip lock pouch. I also keep some money and coins for payphones in it.
 

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"oh where do i pack my keys and wallet? oh it`s such a dilemma i cant sleep at night."
Try your jersey pockets.
Besides what are you doing carrying food on a 30 mi ride. wether is 30 minutes or 30 miles.
With all the unecessary stuff you carry like the locks and stuff you should be carrying a tent too so you feel boy scout safe.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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11,979 Posts
Viva Mexico! said:
"oh where do i pack my keys and wallet? oh it`s such a dilemma i cant sleep at night."
Try your jersey pockets.
Besides what are you doing carrying food on a 30 mi ride. wether is 30 minutes or 30 miles.
With all the unecessary stuff you carry like the locks and stuff you should be carrying a tent too so you feel boy scout safe.
I wouldn't carry my keys in my jersey or any other pocket. One fall on them will explain why. Put'em in your underseat bag. Wallet and other non-sharp items...fine...but keys - no.
 

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Of course, YMMV

Mr. Versatile said:
I wouldn't carry my keys in my jersey or any other pocket. One fall on them will explain why. Put'em in your underseat bag. Wallet and other non-sharp items...fine...but keys - no.
I've carried my keys (typically 3 or 4 keys on a ring) in my jersey pocket for about 35 years and NEVER had a problem. YMMV.
 
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