Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put a cassette on my race wheels and noticed that it was first lop-sided.

Took it off and did it again and it appears flush.

However, now I am unsure as to how much force I should be applying when using the Shimano tool and a wrench to tighten the cassette.

I don't have a torque wrench, but I tightened it down pretty hard - as I would a seatpost collar or something like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,674 Posts
Supersonic said:
I put a cassette on my race wheels and noticed that it was first lop-sided.

Took it off and did it again and it appears flush.

However, now I am unsure as to how much force I should be applying when using the Shimano tool and a wrench to tighten the cassette.

I don't have a torque wrench, but I tightened it down pretty hard - as I would a seatpost collar or something like that.
Do you have access to a vice? If so, use the rim as a lever and tighten it until you feel grating as the lock ring bites into the top sprocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,275 Posts
tight enuff is good enuff with the cassette... the chain pulls in the same direction as tightening, so you won't loosen it with use.... as long as you have secured the cassette on tightly evrything should be high...

dunno about shimano, but campy recommends 50nm, which is tight, but by no means super high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,546 Posts
be careful that the small sproket doesn't rotate out sequence while tighting. i had one do that. lockring was tight but rear sprockets were loose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
beware...

"race wheels" probably means you have an aluminum cassette body. threads on these can easily strip, so take it easy. unless your lbs can't be trusted, they can tighten it for a nominal charge (much cheaper than a new cassette body plus labor).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,160 Posts
not quite...

wankski said:
tight enuff is good enuff with the cassette... the chain pulls in the same direction as tightening, so you won't loosen it with use.... as long as you have secured the cassette on tightly evrything should be high...

dunno about shimano, but campy recommends 50nm, which is tight, but by no means super high.
50NM is right, but the chain tension has nothing to with the lockring staying on. You're thinking about the old days of freewheels that screwed onto the hub. Those were tightened by the chain tension.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,275 Posts
^^ yup, and freewheels SURE are a B*TCH to get off... (long wrench + kick down method works for me... had to find that out after a while)

but no, not what i meant...modern cassettes still have lockrings that turn in the same direction as the cassette does under pedalling... true it has nothing to do with tightening... i was trying to say pedalling won't loosen it or anything.. yes i am retarded... :(

i was trying to say what nocwrench was saying... tight, but don't go nuts on it... not sure how easy/difficult it is to strip, but i don't want to find out... as you say, the chain wont affect the cassette and wont loosen it.. so as long as it is on properly and tight, you should be fine... i have a tq wrench, but i didn't pay any attention to the cassette for this reason. (or anything minus the BB for that matter)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thx 4 your replies

I suppose I'll just leave it as it is and hope for the best.

maybe I should get a torque wrench soon so the guessing game will B over, huh?!?

esp. as I add more carbon parts to my bike, that wrench will come in handy, I hear.
 

·
Soul Mining
Joined
·
382 Posts
Supersonic said:
maybe I should get a torque wrench soon so the guessing game will B over, huh?!?

esp. as I add more carbon parts to my bike, that wrench will come in handy, I hear.

Just make sure the torque wrench is calibrated and accurate. ;)
 

·
Government Mule
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
355 in lbs which I think is equiv to 40 Newton Meters. On the armstrong scale that is snug but not balls out tight with a 3/8 ratchet.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
653 Posts
Not really

wankski said:
^^ yup, and freewheels SURE are a B*TCH to get off... (long wrench + kick down method works for me... had to find that out after a while)
Freewheels are easy to remove off a built wheel. Put a splined removal tool into the freewheel body and LOOSELY clamp the tool in place with a quick release. Then clamp the exposed nut-end of the removal tool into a vise and turn the wheel at the OD. Just remember to turn in the right direction. This will loosen the freewheel every time. Saw a LBS do this a long time ago and I never looked back.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top