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I am doing a century in a month and was looking for suggestions on gels/drinks food for the ride. There are 10 riders and we will be stopping for refueling and lunch. I plan on having a banana, bagel, coffee and oatmeal for breakfast 2 hours before start. I have been using power bar gels, fig newtons, nuuns electrolyte, clif shot blocks to get an idea on what I liked.

I was going to pop one nuuns in each water bottle, have 2-3 fig newtons an hour, and maybe a power bar gel once in a while depending on how I feel.

Any opinions on this formula...or suggestions
 

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I think you have a lot of it covered. I'd increase the fig newtons to 3-4 per hour, just my opinion. Make your rest stops as short as possible. Once you start riding, whether you are riding or stopped at a rest stop, you have carb depletion going on. What you have going on is very prudent and sensible and should be followed by most riders.

I like to eat and don't like to ride on an empty stomach. When I do a Century on my own or 80 miles or so, sometimes less depending upon how I feel and what I'm doing after the ride, I stop and buy a hoagie, have them cut it into quarters, put it in a double plastic bag that I carry, stuff it into the back of my jersey, and every once in a while stop and eat another quarter.
 

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It depends on terrain/speed, but if it were me, I'd probably eat that large breakfast an hour or so earlier & have a snack (clif bar or something) about an hour before the start of the ride.
As for the ride itself, I like some of the stuff that Powerbar makes- their endurance drink and gels are my fav (mainly because they taste good & contain plenty of salt), though everyone is different & you may find something you like better.
 

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I think Andrea138 makes more nutrition sense for a Century to eat the breakfast one hour earlier and eat a cliff bar later. The food takes a lot of time to get into the system and be ingested, dissolved, assimilated to be able to do the body good. I don't like to ride on an empty stomach so I eat my breakfast a little later and feel that by eating later, when I'm starting to deplete things then the breakfast is being absorbed and starting to replenish. Not sure about this but that's what I do.
 

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pretender said:
I think they are off base on # 3, which they conclude with,

"Look, we're not going into a long physiology lesson now; we just want to save your body, your health, and your performance. If you take the “garbage in, garbage out” concept with any seriousness you'll avoid the glucose/sucrose/fructose/dextrose products and stick with complex carbohydrate fuels."

IOW, the science doesn't appear to support our claims so we'll just rubbish it and fall back on marketing BS to take advantage of the public's misconception about "evil" sugars.

Not that I've looked but I've not seen a study that shows complex carbs are better than simple sugars, and would like to if they are out there?

In this study, they rode for two hours at a low work rate but then time-trialed as hard as they could to complete a set amount of work designed to take about an hour. The group that used fructose performed better.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/...ez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

Not to mention most people aren't going to be doing a long ride at a very high intensity because of the inverse relationship between power and duration. So certainly in those instances, mixed carb sources should be beneficial.

I've been using my own maltodextrin/fructose drink at about 400 kcal/hour rate for up to 3.5 hours and during shorter 2 to 2.5 hour rides with longish moderate intensity intervals without any sort of GI issues.

Also #4 is suspect to me? Protein as fuel substrate usually gets treated as a constant. If you go long, it's typically fat as a substrate that increases as carbohydrate is decreased.
 

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Dwayne Barry said:
IOW, the science doesn't appear to support our claims so we'll just rubbish it and fall back on marketing BS to take advantage of the public's misconception about "evil" sugars.
I agree that the verbiage plays to that anti-sugar hysteria.

What I recall, is the primary advantage of maltodextrin over other sugars is it's more readily absorbed by the stomach. That said, I don't know if I buy that story, either. Might make just as much sense to take honey as a gel pack. (There actually is a company that sells honey packs...presumably at great markup compared to what you can get at the supermarket.)
 

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Arnie Baker has an excellent book titled on "Nutrition for Sports".

His argument FOR maltodextrin is:
Caloric
Carbohydrate
Low osmolarity (particle concentration)
Less likely to cause GI distress
Minimal taste - use flavoring of choice
Inexpensive

Basically what he says is that you can get more calories though a higher concentration of maltodextrin without upsetting your stomach. I use Cytomax at full strength and it works great for me.

He also has a recipe for making your own maltodextrin based drink, but I haven't tried that.
 

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I'm ok with a humongous breakfast two hours before the ride/race. But you have to experiment and see what works for you.

On organized centuries I'll eat at stops and grab food to stuff in my jersey pocket so I can eat while riding as well. Eating less food more frequently works better than eating more food less often. On self-supported rides I'm eating while I ride, except maybe one food stop if it's long and I am with other riders.

For long rides/races I try to get down 250-300 calories an hour starting right at the beginning.
 

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ericm979 said:
I'm ok with a humongous breakfast two hours before the ride/race. But you have to experiment and see what works for you.
I used to go to races with a woman who would regularly be eating a bowl of oatmeal as we were pulling into the parking lot. I could never figure out how she didn't end up barfing as soon as the hammer went down. Different strokes for different folks.
 

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MerlinAma said:
Arnie Baker has an excellent book titled on "Nutrition for Sports".

His argument FOR maltodextrin is:
Caloric
Carbohydrate
Low osmolarity (particle concentration)
Less likely to cause GI distress
Minimal taste - use flavoring of choice
Inexpensive

Basically what he says is that you can get more calories though a higher concentration of maltodextrin without upsetting your stomach. I use Cytomax at full strength and it works great for me.

He also has a recipe for making your own maltodextrin based drink, but I haven't tried that.
Check out what most of the pros eat while racing long days. Last time I knew, their favorites were still good old fashioned cakes, tarts, and Coke. They taste good, are readily available just about anywhere, and provide some good stuff for you. For example, if I go out on a ride more then 4 hours, my stop WILL include one Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme Pie. For 29 cents, you can't get anything better than that.

Skip lunch. Stop at mile 50, get some food, replenish water, and then stop again at mile 100.
 
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