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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was in the LBS yesterday and and the mechanic had installed cerammic bearing in a bikes bottom bracket and in the wheels. For those of you who have installed ceramics how have they held up. Is this guy going to have to replace these more often, than what came with his factory group.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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there are lots of factors that will affect the life of any bearing, standard, stainless, ceramic hybrid or full ceramic. the first thing is how precisely machined the space they fit into is. if it's not square and concentric, any bearing will wear quickly. in the case of a bottom bracket, the frame needs to be faced so the cups (if an external cup bb is used) have a flat surface to bear against that is perpendicular in all directions to the spindle.
after all this is taken care of, most bearings will last quite a while. it's tough w/ ceramic hybrids because the races are still steel and the ceramic balls are harder. if any dirt or corrosion gets past the shields, it just gets turned into a rusty/dirty paste. i don't think it's worth the $$$ for a normal road or mountain bike. i have hybrids in the bb and rr hub of my track bike, and full ceramics in the front hub. the bb is from enduro and the cane creek hubs are machined perfectly. i've seen no wear at all since that bike is only ridden on the track, never gets dirty, thus never needs to get wet. i re-lube them every 5-8 days of riding at the track and they're fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
cxwrench said:
there are lots of factors that will affect the life of any bearing, standard, stainless, ceramic hybrid or full ceramic. the first thing is how precisely machined the space they fit into is. if it's not square and concentric, any bearing will wear quickly. in the case of a bottom bracket, the frame needs to be faced so the cups (if an external cup bb is used) have a flat surface to bear against that is perpendicular in all directions to the spindle.
after all this is taken care of, most bearings will last quite a while. it's tough w/ ceramic hybrids because the races are still steel and the ceramic balls are harder. if any dirt or corrosion gets past the shields, it just gets turned into a rusty/dirty paste. i don't think it's worth the $$$ for a normal road or mountain bike. i have hybrids in the bb and rr hub of my track bike, and full ceramics in the front hub. the bb is from enduro and the cane creek hubs are machined perfectly. i've seen no wear at all since that bike is only ridden on the track, never gets dirty, thus never needs to get wet. i re-lube them every 5-8 days of riding at the track and they're fine.
thanks for you input. I agree I can't see spending the money for these but then again it's not my money.
 

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Wear factors

andre71144 said:
I was in the LBS yesterday and and the mechanic had installed cerammic bearing in a bikes bottom bracket and in the wheels. For those of you who have installed ceramics how have they held up. Is this guy going to have to replace these more often, than what came with his factory group.
The places where ceramic bearings (at equivalent specification to steel) offer increased longevity are 1) very high temperatures, 2) very high rpm, 3) corrosive environments. None of these apply for bicycles.
 

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Ceramic doesn't necessarily mean it's better. Campy and Shimano design their high end hubs and bottom brackets to be smooth and durable and have only recently added ceramics (IMO) to meet consumer demand. I have a new Record 11 crankset with hybrid bearings but the 2007 Alloy Centaur UT crankset it replaced had around 10K absolutely silent/smooth miles and still felt smooth when turned by hand. The 10 speed stuff will have a new life on my MXL.
 

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Juanmoretime
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bigbill said:
Ceramic doesn't necessarily mean it's better. Campy and Shimano design their high end hubs and bottom brackets to be smooth and durable and have only recently added ceramics (IMO) to meet consumer demand. I have a new Record 11 crankset with hybrid bearings but the 2007 Alloy Centaur UT crankset it replaced had around 10K absolutely silent/smooth miles and still felt smooth when turned by hand. The 10 speed stuff will have a new life on my MXL.
My Record UT 10 speed had some play in the crank bearings at 4,000 miles. They weren't done for although another 1,000 would have been a stretch. Yes it was installed properly and the bb shell faced. I put in Endro hybrid ceramics but only rode those for a couple of hundred miles before moving on to my Zipp VumaQuads.
 
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