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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question regarding the chain and seat stays on some bikes. I know some aluminum bikes use carbon fiber seat and/or chain stays to provide a more supple ride. Does this alter the longevity or durability of the frame?

I have thought about a Ritchey Breakaway as a travel bike but thinking about the Cross version instead of the Road simply because the Cross version has a full titanium rear triangle where the Road version has carbon seat and chain stays. I'm also exploring the idea of purchasing it used so there may be no warranty should something happen immediately.

What are your experiences with this combination versus a conventional single material frame?
 

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Carbon will outlast aluminum. Carbon will break easier, but aluminum would probably also be rendered unserviceable at those loads.

Aluminum/carbon joints can be a problem if the correct procedure/joint components were not followed. The probablility of Ritchey joints having this problem is virtually zero.
 

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I know some aluminum bikes use carbon fiber seat and/or chain stays to provide a more supple ride.
Not really. You can get the ride you want with either material (or steel or titanium) by adjusting tube wall thickness, tube diameter, and tube shape. The mixed material bike has a mixed history: done well it does not present a problem but it has been done poorly on a number of brands over the years. It is mostly a marketing ploy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good to know. I wonder what the reasoning is on the Ritchey Breakaway Road. Since titanium dampens pretty well, if done correctly.
 

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The carbon rear triangle was indeed a marketing exercise, but that's not saying it was a bad thing. People who wanted carbon but couldn't see themselves shelling out big bucks for a full carbon bike liked it, with most of them believing it would smooth out road chatter. Manufacturers liked it because it was cheaper to glue an inexpensive fully formed carbon triangle into the mainframe than to have a good welder spend time on a number of welds. Since it did no harm, it was sort of a win-win proposition.

When the carbon rear triangle started to appear on indifferent entry-level bikes, it lost some of its cache. Full carbon also became more affordable, so there was no real need to compromise any longer if the first-time buyer wanted carbon. It's too harsh to say that the carbon rear triangle is a relic of the past, but it does remind one of the bicycle retail scene around about 15 years ago.
 

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Since titanium dampens pretty well, if done correctly.
Again, you are falling for the hype. Frames can be designed to be damp, lively, etc. by controlling the geometry, tube shape, tube diameter, and tube wall thickness. And of course wheels and mostly tires have an influence as well. Ti frames are not inherently better damped. Just ask anyone who owned a Litespeed Ultimate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Again, you are falling for the hype. Frames can be designed to be damp, lively, etc. by controlling the geometry, tube shape, tube diameter, and tube wall thickness. And of course wheels and mostly tires have an influence as well. Ti frames are not inherently better damped. Just ask anyone who owned a Litespeed Ultimate.
Yes, I get that, but still curious as to why they made it that way.
 

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They made it that way to sell bikes. Back in the day... More $ than all alum, less $ than full on CF.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They made it that way to sell bikes. Back in the day... More $ than all alum, less $ than full on CF.
Since you mentioned that, I wonder if it was done to make it cheaper than a full titanium or full carbon bike...
 

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Since you mentioned that, I wonder if it was done to make it cheaper than a full titanium or full carbon bike...
Yes, cheaper. And people back then liked it. So if you peddled (not pedaled) bikes, a winner. Carbon stuff can be made very cheaply if you crank it out in volume.
 

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why spend 3k on a heavy cross frame when you can just buy a good case for your road bike? Most airlines will end up charging you the same for the breakaway baggage (Rictchey makes a big point of disclosing this). There are plenty of good bike cases that are compact enough to fit into cars etc after the airport...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
why spend 3k on a heavy cross frame when you can just buy a good case for your road bike? Most airlines will end up charging you the same for the breakaway baggage (Rictchey makes a big point of disclosing this). There are plenty of good bike cases that are compact enough to fit into cars etc after the airport...
Because I don't have a road bike yet :wink5:. Currently own a Surly CrossCheck and its set up as my commuter/day tourer. I travel at least twice a year to places where I would like to ride, hence I am thinking about a travel bike (and N+1). While I don't mind riding a CX bike, been toying with the idea of a road bike to add to my collection. Another situation where I may be falling for the hype, but I like the versatility of a CX bike compared to a dedicated road bike (rack mount specifically).

I also thought the Ritchey Breakaway travel bag is small enough that it counts as regular luggage instead of oversized. I guess I haven't really researched bike cases/bags that can skirt the limit also.
 

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I also thought the Ritchey Breakaway travel bag is small enough that it counts as regular luggage instead of oversized.
Technically, it may not be. Some time ago, the Ritchey bag was a smidgeon over the limit, but with people reporting that the airlines were nice about it and didn't charge for oversized. At any rate, check it out carefully. Both I and my info are a bit long in the tooth.
 

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Technically, it may not be. Some time ago, the Ritchey bag was a smidgeon over the limit, but with people reporting that the airlines were nice about it and didn't charge for oversized. At any rate, check it out carefully. Both I and my info are a bit long in the tooth.
the problem is also inconsistency at the same airline and different policies across airlines. There's pricing for oversized and also for sporting good categories (the two are not the same at some airlines). But for twice a year you could save yourself a lot of money, get a nice (real) road bike, and a decent case, and even if you paid extra at the airline you'd still be ahead $. The British sites have lots of bags and the duty threshold was raised to $800 if you want a bag/case on a budget...
 
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