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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any suggestions for a chain-tensioner that will work with semi-horizontal dropouts and a quick release? I have to take both wheels off of my fixie every time I put it in the trunk of my car (often). Is there an easy to use chain-tensioner that will let me easily take the wheel on and off?
 

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Any One

Any chain tensioner will work on a road bike, well i take that back it would probably be hard to find bottom bracket mounted chain tensioners for a road bike (but i bet if you found them it would work).

Anyways, i rode with a cheap Godspeed tensioner i got of ebay with the spacer and cog all for like $30. Rode that thing for a year (at 53x18) without any probelms at all. Now of course i use solid axel wheels and this would be the way to go for you if you weren't taking that back wheel off all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not the spring loaded kind

Thanks, but I was thinking of the kind of tensioner that pulls the axle back, like the Surly Tuggnut, not a spring loaded cog thing for a single speed. Maybe they are called something else.
 

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The terminology gets a little cumbersome - when I hear "chain tensioner" I think of a pseudo-derailleur thing. I guess "axle tensioner" would be more accurate, or we'll just go with Tuggnut. Anyway, on some semi-horizontal dropouts, there's a screw of sorts that goes from the back of the dropout and extends into the dropout slot, providing an adjustable point that stops the axle from being pulled further back. I'm sure it wouldn't be cost-effective to drill and thread a new hole in your frame, but that's kind of what you need. I guess the other option is to get the chain length/cog/chainring to work such that the chain is properly tensioned when the wheel is pulled back all the way into the slot.
Of course, the simpler thing would be to just buy a new car with a bigger trunk!
 

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Sorry, I guees we wern't on the same wave length there. However, I was in your same situation and what I did was upt a hitch on the back of my car and run a hitch mounted bike rack.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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Roundabout said:
Any suggestions for a chain-tensioner that will work with semi-horizontal dropouts and a quick release? I have to take both wheels off of my fixie every time I put it in the trunk of my car (often). Is there an easy to use chain-tensioner that will let me easily take the wheel on and off?
I would think that all of the tugnut types will be difficult to take on and off.

Try using a bolt (with a very flat head on the inside) that stays in the drop out - one on each side. Once you get them positioned correctly, you would just pull the wheel back tight against these bolts and tighten it down. I would use a solid axle and nuts, but you could try a real, real good QR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you guys missing the point, or am I? I do not have one of these things, but as I understand it, as you turn the screw on a chain/axle tensioner, it pulls the axle back, tightening the chain. It will also help avoid having the axle slip in the dropout. Putting in a stop will not do any of that (the chain itself is a pretty effective stop). It looks like these things go over the axle (so you need a long enough axle), and then go over the open ends of a rear-facing dropout. Has anybody seen one that would fit on the closed end of a semi-horizontal dropout?
 

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Roundabout said:
Are you guys missing the point, or am I? I do not have one of these things, but as I understand it, as you turn the screw on a chain/axle tensioner, it pulls the axle back, tightening the chain. It will also help avoid having the axle slip in the dropout. Putting in a stop will not do any of that (the chain itself is a pretty effective stop). It looks like these things go over the axle (so you need a long enough axle), and then go over the open ends of a rear-facing dropout. Has anybody seen one that would fit on the closed end of a semi-horizontal dropout?

--edited for clarity---

Perhaps I misunderstood. In your first post, it seemed that your goal was to be able to quickly locate the axle in the right position for proper chain tension, not to keep it from sliding forward. If that were the case, a "stop" would work. But since you want to hold the wheel back, only a Tuggnut-style device will do. Looking at my Surly Tuggnut, it looks like it would do the trick, as the part that rests against the back of the track dropout is inside the plate that surrounds the axle. The only catch is that the part that rests against the back of the dropout is "T" shaped, with the bottom of the T going into the open end of the dropout. You might need something flat or perhaps curved, to create a larger contact point with the back of the horizontal dropout. Something like the photo below, pehaps. And yes, your axle needs to be long enough to accomodate its thickness.
 

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There really isn't an off the shelf option, you're going to have to alter your frame if you really want to make it work or do what TurboTurtle suggested.

The problem is whatever is on the top side of the dropout, you will have to remove (like a fender/rack mount.) Then if you notch the area just opposite the inside of the dropout you can use a Tuggnut because the plate will rest against the outside of the dropout and the bolt with T shape will rest in the notch you made.

I'm fairly certain there was a photo posted where someone accomplished this sometime back.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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asterisk said:
There really isn't an off the shelf option, you're going to have to alter your frame if you really want to make it work or do what TurboTurtle suggested.

The problem is whatever is on the top side of the dropout, you will have to remove (like a fender/rack mount.) Then if you notch the area just opposite the inside of the dropout you can use a Tuggnut because the plate will rest against the outside of the dropout and the bolt with T shape will rest in the notch you made.

I'm fairly certain there was a photo posted where someone accomplished this sometime back.
Even if you find a way to make a tugnut work, it has to be adjuted every time which is more of a pain than a solid axle and track nuts. - TF
 

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TurboTurtle said:
...more of a pain than a solid axle and track nuts. - TF
Oops, didn't catch the part about using quick release.. yeah, q/r and fixed is a bad combo to begin with. If you switch to a solid rear axle with propper track nuts, you won't have nearly the problem with slippage. +1 to TT.
 

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MORE MINIMALISM DANG IT!!
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You can make your own

Roundabout said:
Any suggestions for a chain-tensioner that will work with semi-horizontal dropouts and a quick release? I have to take both wheels off of my fixie every time I put it in the trunk of my car (often). Is there an easy to use chain-tensioner that will let me easily take the wheel on and off?
With a piece of angle iron and a set screw. The hard part is cutting and drilling the angle iron.
 
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