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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been riding for the past 5+ years. I have a 2009 Giant Cypress and I'm averaging 3,000 mile per year. I try to remove, clean and oil my chain every 200 miles. I ride country black top roads in southern Indiana with what I would call moderate hills. I changed my chain and rear cassette both at 6,000 miles and I'm now on 16,000 miles. I check last week before cleaning the chain and I measured 1/8 inch stretch at 12 inches. At that time I changed to a new chain, but did not have a new cassette to replace the old one with. Once I changed out the chain, it started skipping/jumping when I was in the 4th or 5th rear cog. I switched back to the old chain and the skipping stopped. I now have a new rear cassette and plan to switch both the chain and cassette tonight. So it would appear to me that the chain and rear cassette had both worn so much that when I changed only the chain, that caused the new chain to skip on the rear cassette. Does this make sense? Also, should I be concerned about the front chain ring (three gears)? Sorry for the long post and thanks for any advice. Jay
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I've been riding for the past 5+ years. I have a 2009 Giant Cypress and I'm averaging 3,000 mile per year. I try to remove, clean and oil my chain every 200 miles. I ride country black top roads in southern Indiana with what I would call moderate hills. I changed my chain and rear cassette both at 6,000 miles and I'm now on 16,000 miles. I check last week before cleaning the chain and I measured 1/8 inch stretch at 12 inches. At that time I changed to a new chain, but did not have a new cassette to replace the old one with. Once I changed out the chain, it started skipping/jumping when I was in the 4th or 5th rear cog. I switched back to the old chain and the skipping stopped. I now have a new rear cassette and plan to switch both the chain and cassette tonight. So it would appear to me that the chain and rear cassette had both worn so much that when I changed only the chain, that caused the new chain to skip on the rear cassette. Does this make sense? Also, should I be concerned about the front chain ring (three gears)? Sorry for the long post and thanks for any advice. Jay
That's how it works. It's been the subject of probably thousands of posts about drivetrain wear. You remove your chain every 200miles?!? I don't even do that on the race bikes I work on. Just degrease it and rinse it off w/ a sponge. No reason to do that much work...unless you have nothing else to do.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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At 1/8" elongation, your chain has all but ruined your cassette. If you want to keep cassettes for a long time, you need to change the chain at 1/16" elongation.
 

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I changed my chain and rear cassette both at 6,000 miles and I'm now on 16,000 miles. I check last week before cleaning the chain and I measured 1/8 inch stretch at 12 inches.
You should measure more often, and change the chain when it gets to 1/16 "stretch" (that's about .5%). The reason your cassette was wrecked was because you let the chain get too worn. 1% chain elongation will do in the cassette cogs quickly.
 

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You should measure more often, and change the chain when it gets to 1/16 "stretch" (that's about .5%). The reason your cassette was wrecked was because you let the chain get too worn. 1% chain elongation will do in the cassette cogs quickly.
But the cassette will wear out eventually even if you put on a new chain every 500 miles. A worn chain will wear both cassette and chain rings faster, but they still wear.
 

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Also, should I be concerned about the front chain ring (three gears)?
Maybe. It depends on the quality of the rings, how much force you apply to your pedaling, and whether you ride on all three rings or stay on one most of the time. The typical symptom of a worn chain ring is chain suck (chain "sticks" on the ring and doesn't shift properly). You can also look at the teeth on the rings and see how "shark finned" they have become. Don't be confused if different rings have different shapes; they are made that way to improve shifting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I ordered the Parker CC32 when I ordered the new cassette so I will do a better job of checking the chain wear in the future. If I keep the chain clean as I have been (clean and oil every 200 miles) and replace the chain at .5% wear, does that extend the life of the cassette significantly? Although it is a wreck now, I did run it for 10,000 miles, so am I looking at extending that to 20,000 or 30,000 miles? Just trying to gain a better understanding. Also, I have triple crankset on the front, should I be concerned that they are worn badly as well? Thanks for all the advice and knowledge. Jay
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Yes, there have been quite a few posts on this subject as well as controversies over which practice is best - replace chain earlier to extend life of cassette OR wait until both chain and cassette are worn and change them together? Your decision could be made depending on the cost of the cassette you use. Many cassettes now are not that much more expensive than a chain.

Regardless, it is important to remember than your chain and cassette effectively "marry each other". A new chain on an old cassette will be a mismatch and depending on the severity of this mismatch will determine whether your shifting will be affected. This happens with the chain rings as well, but will affect shifting to a lesser degree. Since the load is spread over more teeth on a chain ring, that mismatch is less likely to create shifting problems.
 

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I ordered the Parker CC32 when I ordered the new cassette so I will do a better job of checking the chain wear in the future. If I keep the chain clean as I have been (clean and oil every 200 miles) and replace the chain at .5% wear, does that extend the life of the cassette significantly? Although it is a wreck now, I did run it for 10,000 miles, so am I looking at extending that to 20,000 or 30,000 miles? Just trying to gain a better understanding. Also, I have triple crankset on the front, should I be concerned that they are worn badly as well? Thanks for all the advice and knowledge. Jay
General rule of thumb is new cassette for every 3 chains. My rule of thumb is replace each when needed, whenever that might happen to be.
 

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I ordered the Parker CC32 when I ordered the new cassette so I will do a better job of checking the chain wear in the future. If I keep the chain clean as I have been (clean and oil every 200 miles) and replace the chain at .5% wear, does that extend the life of the cassette significantly? Although it is a wreck now, I did run it for 10,000 miles, so am I looking at extending that to 20,000 or 30,000 miles? Just trying to gain a better understanding. Also, I have triple crankset on the front, should I be concerned that they are worn badly as well? Thanks for all the advice and knowledge. Jay
Chain checkers don't offer anything much over using a ruler to measure elongation. Many of them are highly inaccurate, showing new chains to be significantly worn. The only risk there is replacing chains more often than needed and thereby wasting money.

How many miles you can get out of a cassette depends on the quality of the cassette, your riding conditions, maintenance quality, and how much force you apply to the pedals. High grade components, riding in dry and "clean" weather (no dust), frequent maintenance with good lube, and pedaling easy will make chains and cassettes last a long time. 20K miles is not out of possibility but 30K is probably more miles than almost anyone will experience.

Worn chain rings have shark-tooth shaped teeth and exhibit poor shifting and chain suck. Worn rings are less of an issue until they get really bad and you start getting chain skip.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Worn chain rings have shark-tooth shaped teeth and exhibit poor shifting and chain suck. Worn rings are less of an issue until they get really bad and you start getting chain skip.
"Shark-finned" teeth can be misleading if they are on only some teeth and not all. Those are designed that way to make upshifting smoother. If ALL the teeth have sharp points, that's a good sign the ring is toast.
 

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"Shark-finned" teeth can be misleading if they are on only some teeth and not all. Those are designed that way to make upshifting smoother. If ALL the teeth have sharp points, that's a good sign the ring is toast.
Absolutely right. I can't count how many times people have come on here with a picture of the sculptured teeth that are part of common chain ring profiles and asked if their rings were damaged.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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I'm still trying to figure out the OP's priorities; he is in the 'borderline obsessive' category with removing and cleaning his chain every 200 miles, yet he lets it elongate to 1/8" over 12". I mean, what's the point of all that cleaning if you're not going to retire it when it is due, and save your cogs?
 

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How many miles you can get out of a cassette depends on the quality of the cassette, your riding conditions, maintenance quality, and how much force you apply to the pedals. High grade components, riding in dry and "clean" weather (no dust), frequent maintenance with good lube, and pedaling easy will make chains and cassettes last a long time. 20K miles is not out of possibility but 30K is probably more miles than almost anyone will experience.
you touch on a lot of truths. I'm a spinner not a masher, pretty fastidious about cleaning (fwiw, don't use solvents) and lubing and rarely ride in wet conditions.

have a DA 8-spd cassette with ~60K miles on it that still performs flawlessly.
 

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General rule of thumb is new cassette for every 3 chains. My rule of thumb is replace each when needed, whenever that might happen to be.
That is extreme, and costly.
I have Campy 11 spd cassettes (not the Ti ones) with 30K miles on then, and they work perfectly fine.
When following the Campy chain spec, I get 3000-3500 miles per chain. So that's 9-10 chains per cassette and the cassette is still good.
YMMV on other brands & models.
 

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I'm using my own cpt's as an example. Ultegra 6800 cassette is about $60, chain is under $30. If you are replacing the chain too soon just to save the cassette which tends to get replaced once every two times you replace the chain I'm not sure how much money you are saving.

The way I economize here is using Ultegra chain and cassette on my otherwise Dura Ace set-up. And based on some of the opinions on the Dura Ace cassette I may actually be enjoying a better ride and seeing more longevity on the chain and cassette.
 

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The way I economize here is using Ultegra chain and cassette on my otherwise Dura Ace set-up. And based on some of the opinions on the Dura Ace cassette I may actually be enjoying a better ride and seeing more longevity on the chain and cassette.
The reason Dura Ace cassettes wear out faster is because the cogs are Ti instead of steel. You are trading longevity and more money for weight savings.
 

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The reason Dura Ace cassettes wear out faster is because the cogs are Ti instead of steel. You are trading longevity and more money for weight savings.
Understood, but I view it as trading weight for longevity and cost savings. the opposite of how you phrased it. plus there are some reports that 9000 cassettes creak although shimano reportedly fixed that issue years ago.
 

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Understood, but I view it as trading weight for longevity and cost savings. the opposite of how you phrased it.
Well yes, I agree with you on that. I just phrased it before for the weight weenies.
 
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