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Yesterday, while riding through horse country I was chased by a pretty mean looking dog. This is the first time I remember this happening. That was one mean looking dog, and barking. When I realized he wasn't going to catch me, I slowed down a bit upon coming to a higher traffic area. I found myself very concerned that the dog was going to chase me right into an intersection. Finally, the dog let up - it seemed I just came to the end of the property/farm. I will say that I didn't know what the heck I would've done had the dog actually been nipping at my heels (or worse). The only thing I could think of was to put my bike between myself and the dog. Anyway, I was glad it ended peacefully.
 

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My advise about dogs and bikes is........."Always carry a sandwich".
By this, I mean always ride with someone who is slower and less observant than you are. If a dog comes charging out from behind you, your speed will leave your "friend" as lunch for thwe dog.If you are behind your "friend", you can see the dog first, and then swing over to the side away from the dog, accelerating past your "friend".
 

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Squirt'em with your water bottle. Don't throw anything, try to kick them, or hit them with your pump. It'll only slow you down & throw you off balance to boot. Keeping your bike between the dog & you is an excellent idea. Hold it by the seat & handlebars,If you get luckt, you may also get to bash the sucker in the face with the spokes of the rear wheel. Some people swear by Halt, or other products of that type. I've used them, & they work fine, but it's just another thing I'd have to carry.
 

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MR_GRUMPY said:
My advise about dogs and bikes is........."Always carry a sandwich".
By this, I mean always ride with someone who is slower and less observant than you are. If a dog comes charging out from behind you, your speed will leave your "friend" as lunch for thwe dog.If you are behind your "friend", you can see the dog first, and then swing over to the side away from the dog, accelerating past your "friend".
Dog Rule - You don't have to out run the dog. You only have to out run your friend. Works for bears and mountain lions too.
 

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The first 2 times I rode home on my new commute, a dog chased me. It was suppose to be one of those invisibile fences, but the dog just ran thru it. Well anyway, I was driving home a few days ago, and the dog got nailed by a truck. The owner had to know that dog was running out in the street. I changed my commute home because of the traffic on that street, and that dog.
 

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One of my favorite rides has the same problem. There is this one house that has two dogs that love to come out barking and chasing every time I ride by. I ride alone so the friend idea won't work for me. Thus far, I haven't been bit but if I do it won't be a good situation for me, the dogs or the owner. I know the owners know that their dogs are doing this but not once have they came out and called the dogs off. I have even gotten to the point that I hope a car will be coming the opposite direction and take the dogs out when they cross the street to begin their chase. The sad part of this is that there aren't many cars on that road and with my luck they would swerve to miss the dogs and run over me. Oh well, I guess I will just continue to ride real slow by the dogs to limit their fun with me.
 

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I've found that a couple of the dogs that chase me on my regular route, if I stop, they stop chasing me and just go back to the farm. Of course, when the German sheperd comes after me, I just start pedaling as hard as I can.
 

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On one of my first rides on my new 585 I got chased for about 1/4 mi by a German Shepard. Man, I learned the sprint capability of this bike quick. But I found I couldn't outrun the dog, and that he couldn't catch me. At about 30+mph on the flat it was a standoff. At first I thought we were both at top speed, but I came to suspect that he was traveling at whatever speed he needed to do the chase. I probably could've eased off a bit(if the adreneline wasn't pumping so high) and been fine.
 

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Kick'em

I have had a couple of dogs chase me before I found that squriting them with your water can do the trick
i have heard some people say that the ball bearings rolling around drives them nuts. I am not real sure how true it is but Thats what I heard
 

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That Eddie, he's a real mother *%#@%&!!!!!!!! Rotflmfao the f is for fat ahahaha!



I got chased by a Pit bull the other day and that popped into my head right away (After I shook him). It is ammazing the obscure things that pop into your head just at the right time. Unless it is important! ----Mike
 

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Overcranked23 said:
Kick'em

I have had a couple of dogs chase me before I found that squriting them with your water can do the trick
i have heard some people say that the ball bearings rolling around drives them nuts. I am not real sure how true it is but Thats what I heard
Dogs are hunters. No matter how small they may be, or how strangely they've been bred, they are territorial pack hunters. Riding by their territory triggers the chase instinct. This is stronger in some breeds and varies from individual to individual as well. They don't chase cars, (usually) because they don't recognize them as potential prey. They (usually) don't chase walkers, because they are moving slowly. Dogs are used to seeing humans like this, and therefore there isn't the prey/chase instinct or the potential threat perception. Bicycles, motorcycles and runners are different. They look like they might be prey or somekind of threat, so the dog is likely either to chase or to attempt to defend his home turf.
 

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most dogs out where i am seem to be the sort that start barking on the porch and by the time they get out to you they are happy to run alongside and just let you know this is their piece of ground.

I had an ambush dog the other day though scared the bejesus out of me. He was sitting closeish to the road i guess and didnt bark at all untill he cleared the scrub on the edge of the road. I wish i had a video of me looking back and down at the dog as i am standing on the pedals angling away from him. I am sure it was pretty funny looking, I am glad there was no traffic because i would have been into it.

Silly now, dangerous then.
 

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the water bottle is a really good way to get him off your tail. But if the animal is getting out and chasing often you need to call the cops. While we are adults and the risk isn't too much think of a 10 year old kid on a bike. A dog taking off after them is pretty likely to make them crash. Then perhaps mauled.

Owners need to be held responsible for their animals. Letting them run at will at a passer by is absurd. Save the kid the pain of the animal attack and take care of it before its an issue. And keep calling the cops. Every damm day until its taken care of.
 

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Woolbury said:
On one of my first rides on my new 585 I got chased for about 1/4 mi by a German Shepard. Man, I learned the sprint capability of this bike quick. But I found I couldn't outrun the dog, and that he couldn't catch me. At about 30+mph on the flat it was a standoff. At first I thought we were both at top speed, but I came to suspect that he was traveling at whatever speed he needed to do the chase. I probably could've eased off a bit(if the adreneline wasn't pumping so high) and been fine.
Most dogs actually chase people because they see it as a game of chase. Chances are if you turned your bike around they would run the other way thinking you are trying to chace them. I do this with my lab up and down my block to exercise her. I teach obedience classes on the weekends and I actually encourage my students to use this with their dogs as it increases their bond between owner and dog.

Dogs that are left outside have a great desire for someone to just play with them. If the owner just leaves them outside where they can get loose they are probably neglected and don't get the attention that they NEED as a domesticated animal.I do realize that there are truly agressive dogs out there, and there is very little that one can do once the chace is engaged to tell if the dog is agressive or not. Also, a neglected dog is a good sign that the dog just might be agressive especially if it is a pit pull.

Just a little fun fact: the average adult dog can exert 150lbs of pressure with its jaws. A pit bull can exert somewhere in the neighberhood of 350lbs of pressure with its Jaws!!! Translates to = stay the hell away from pits that are loose. Not to give them a bad name because they make amazing pets, if they are raised correctly.
 

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Keep in mind...

Yes, dogs are "chasers" and tend to be protective of their property. When a dog barks and gives chase and you respond by upping your heart rate to 220 or whatever to get away from the dog, you have basically reinforced that chasing behavior. The dog chases you because he wants you to go away; he barks and runs toward you; you sprint away; dog realizes that chasing and barking makes that funny-thing on two wheels go away and the dog is likely to do the same thing over and over again. When you see a dog, you have at least three courses of action. First, you can sprint and take a survival of the fittest approach and leave the less strong riders to "suffer." Second, you can have some dog bones in your jersey pocket and "make friends." Third, you can simply stop, get off your bike and wait for the dog to lose interest (about 1-2 minutes, sometimes sooner or longer) and then get back on the bike. There are dogs on the roads that I have made friends with and they will leave me alone when I am riding around, but someone unfamiliar gets the full-blown "If-I-catch-you-I-am-going-to-eat-your-liver" treatment. Me, I always stop. To me, the short time off the bike to deal with a do is worth it compared to what could happen if the dog caught me trying to sprint away. Especially, since my sprint is not what it used to be :mad2:
 
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