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FatTireFred said:
https://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=24354


pretty soon you'll be able to get and entire bike with Nashbar-branded components.
Not suprised. Micro-Shift is making these for a few companies right now. TOKEN Acuura are the same as well as SAMSON.



Rumor is Micro-Shift making FSA 11 speed group.

The nashbar ones will make great budget bike.s
 

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Recently completed my first "frame up" build. Out of all the component prices, nothing shocked me more than the cost of decent brifters. Ok, I understand they are fairly complex devices, but charging $300+ for higher-end Shimano STI seems insane!

This is especially true when you consider they are vulnerable to crash damage and also very difficult to impossible to repair internally. Had I known about these Micro-Shift versions, I would have given them a try.

BTW, my pair of Ultegras weighed 492 grams. At 406 grams, these Nashbar branded models are notably lighter too. And no, I'm not a Shimano hater since I generally like and use many of their products.

Paul
 

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Paul1PA said:
Recently completed my first "frame up" build. Out of all the component prices, nothing shocked me more than the cost of decent brifters. Ok, I understand they are fairly complex devices, but charging $300+ for higher-end Shimano STI seems insane!

Paul
You know something is wrong with the world when Campy brifters become affordable in comparison to the competition.


BTW---if they shift well--I'd snag a pair---they're probably the only 10s brifters left on the market with alloy blades.
 

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Looks like they have three different 10 speed levers (see below), two different 9 speed, and one 8 speed.
These are probably as good as Tiagra.
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MR_GRUMPY said:
Looks like they have three different 10 speed levers (see below), two different 9 speed, and one 8 speed.
These are probably as good as Tiagra.
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I heard about as good as 105 if not the same.
 

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hayduke1972 said:
Anybody actually tried these?

I'm just wondering how well they work.

I'm more of a reader here [first post; slow cyclist :cool: ], but I actually have ridden two complete Microshift drivetrains that came on two bikes that my father and I ordered last fall - shifters, f/r derailleurs. I have a few hunderd miles of experience with them and lots of experience installing and tuning them.

Overall they seem to work well, but they don't feel as refined in ergonomics, quality, or function as a Shimano shifter. The "feel" of the shifting (downshifts) is more akin to Campy or SRAM because you get a very noticeable "click" for downshifts (small black upper lever); unlike the smooth feel that Shimano has. There is no cable slack in the downshift button from what I can tell; you hit it - it shifts. I ride SRAM Force, so I can't compare it to the feel of SRAM Red that has also eliminated cable slack. The upshifts require a large throw of the lower lever. I think that if you move it far enough you can get 4 gears in the back. The shifting is precise and quick - no complaints there considering the price and performance level. I'd put it on par with the performance of a Shimano 105 group; but with a different downshift feel. The upshifts are very smooth and feel very much like Shimano shifts.

The front derailleur and shifter offers a lot of trim options (4 or 5 different positions I think), but in the big ring (compact and non compact) you still will get a lot of chain rub in your top three gears on the cassette. I haven't been able to eliminate this yet - although with the trim options (both in the small and big ring) it would seem like it is possible. I think the shifter can be used for both triples and doubles depending on where you set the limits, but I have only used it for compact and non compact doubles so far.

The finish and quality is nowhere near the level of Shimano, SRAM, and especially Campy (as would be expected). The aluminum and other metal parts do not seems as precise as what you find on mainstream groups (specifically the levers and derailleurs). The plastics feel more flimsy and brittle as well. The larger lower lever on the shifters feel weak and flex slightly (especially on the left shifter as you move from the small ring to the big ring). The internals are a mix of metal and plastic. It seems they used a lot of plastic in areas they maybe shouldn't have in order to keep the weight down (which is about what they claim). My two biggest complaints is that the shifter cables are not easy to replace if you happen to have a cable go bad (had to drill a cable head out of the shifter) and the springs in the brake lever mechanism are poorly designed [exposed] and did break on one of our shifters (easily fixed, but annoying). I also do not find the ergonomics comfortable at all (I prefer SRAM and Campy), but that is more personal preference. Those who like Shimano ergonomics will find these very familiar and possibly slightly more comfortable as they provide an easier reach to the downshift button/lever and shift very fast.

I actually got rid of this drivetrain on my good carbon bike (KTM Strada LC) that it came on and went with SRAM Force. My father now uses both of the two groups we have; one on his good bike and the other on his bad weather bike. One of the groups has well over 2000 miles on it already with the only problem being the end of the spring in the brake lever breaking off when my father got curious and tore the shifter apart. The set with more miles have survived two crashes and are no worse for wear (unlucky year). The set with fewer miles have had no problems at all and are in perfect working condition with little upkeep required (probably have 300 or 400 miles on them).

If installing the shifters I would recommend a barrel adjuster for the left shifter so you can get rid of the cable rub in the big ring. For a budget 10-speed drivetrain they are a pretty good deal, especially since they are fully Shimano compatible (from what I understand - 5600, 6600, and 7800). They offer a good alternative to buying used components for a low-cost build if you're building with Shimano compatible components, although for a better low cost, high performance, durable 10s build I would recommend Campy Veloce components over these.

Greg
 

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The Vanderkittens were sponsored by Samson for a while (I don't know the current status of their sponsorship, since last time I talked to one of them, I noticed their bike had Shimano on it), but none of the ones I talked to had anything bad to say about them. *shrug*

I guess they work fine.
 

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HeluvaSkier said:
I'm more of a reader here [first post; slow cyclist :cool: ], but I actually have ridden two complete Microshift drivetrains that came on two bikes that my father and I ordered last fall - shifters, f/r derailleurs. I have a few hunderd miles of experience with them and lots of experience installing and tuning them.

Greg
EpicSki? I think I remember you from my short stint there.

You kill them gates, from what I remember.
 

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FYI.....
The "Carbon" lever is a carbon wrap.
 

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Cruzer2424 said:
I noticed their bike had Shimano on it), but none of the ones I talked to had anything bad to say about them.
My guess is the fact that most of they bikes now have Shimano tells you more than you might think. The fact that none of them had anything bad to say about the shifters just tells you the riders are pro enough to now say anything bad about a sponsor as the industry is a small one you don't really wanna piss anyone off.
 

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Paul1PA said:
Recently completed my first "frame up" build. Out of all the component prices, nothing shocked me more than the cost of decent brifters. Ok, I understand they are fairly complex devices, but charging $300+ for higher-end Shimano STI seems insane!

This is especially true when you consider they are vulnerable to crash damage and also very difficult to impossible to repair internally.
Which is a big part of why bar-end shifters are starting to look really good to me for when I build up a bike
later this summer. :D


...
 

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Cruzer2424 said:
EpicSki? I think I remember you from my short stint there.

You kill them gates, from what I remember.
Yep, thats me. I was a moderator over there for a few years and recently stepped down to let someone new take the reigns for awhile. I use cycling to keep me in shape for winter. I used to mountain bike, but road is so much more accessible. I read here a lot, but I'm no cycling or bike expert, so I leave the posting to those who know what they are talking about.
 

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32and3cross said:
My guess is the fact that most of they bikes now have Shimano tells you more than you might think. The fact that none of them had anything bad to say about the shifters just tells you the riders are pro enough to now say anything bad about a sponsor as the industry is a small one you don't really wanna piss anyone off.
Eh. Could have been the mgmt that made the decision, or the riders, or Samson...

I guess I'm saying that it might not have been the product...

FWIW, I was speaking to the particular rider "off the record" if that helps...
 

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I managed to repair a rear Ultegra 10 speed brifter last year. What is even amazing as the price, is the basic concept and construction of the shift mechanism. Think of of a small spring loaded come-along. I have worked on more complicated fishing reels.

Brian
 
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